Thinking about charging for work...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by BD, Jun 21, 2006.

  1. BD

    BD Guest

    Hey all...

    So I've been shooting with decent gear for only a couple of years. I've
    gotten a lot of very positive feedback on some of my work, and have
    been told numerous times that I could make money at it.

    But, I also know that nowadays, decent camera gear is accessible enough
    that anyone with a little money and a little talent can do decent work.

    Over the last while, however, some additional things are beginning to
    gel in my mind:

    -I've been a Photoshop user for several years, and can do everything
    from the basics to 'disaster recovery' - I recently was handed a shot
    that a couple took on their honeymoon, in which the camera was placed
    incorrectly and then the groom ran into the shot. The top of his head
    was cut off, as was the end of the bride's dress. I recovered that shot
    by adding some real estate to the image, cloning, and some very
    detailed repainting - to the point that the couple is almost baffled
    with the result. Nice to see.

    -As well, I'm now getting into framing - I can do everything from
    building and finishing the wood, to cutting the glass and the
    matting... Bought a Logan cutter last week, and it'll pay for itself
    with the 5 double-mat 12x18s that I have planned as a first set.

    I'm starting to see that I really have all the skills to take pictures,
    fix and alter pictures, and frame pictures. The markup on custom
    framing is mortifying, and even after knowing enough to get good rag
    matting and all that (ie not use crap), I'm still saving about 60% off
    retail.

    Is that an unusual combination of skills? I'm really thinking I could
    make something of this.

    Obviously, I need a portfolio, and some framing samples that I could
    show people (which I'm working on)...

    But for me, as a potential customer, the ability to have a 'one-stop
    shop', from the shooting to the post-work to the framing, does have its
    appeal...

    Any thoughts?? Encouragements? Reality checks? ;-)

    Thanks!!
     
    BD, Jun 21, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. BD

    Pat Guest

    I don't want to discourage you. Do what you feel capable of doing.
    Start out slow and see where it goes. But be warned that there are
    lots of photographers out there who do framing and photoshop (although
    few will photoshop some else's image).

    I think there are a lot of photographers out there who use
    "interesting" photo sizes precisely because they do framing -- you
    can't go get a standard mat and frame for the picture. It's
    up-selling.

    Good luck with it.

    Pat.

    P.s. I'll Randall talk you out of it.



    BD wrote:
    > Hey all...
    >
    > So I've been shooting with decent gear for only a couple of years. I've
    > gotten a lot of very positive feedback on some of my work, and have
    > been told numerous times that I could make money at it.
    >
    > But, I also know that nowadays, decent camera gear is accessible enough
    > that anyone with a little money and a little talent can do decent work.
    >
    > Over the last while, however, some additional things are beginning to
    > gel in my mind:
    >
    > -I've been a Photoshop user for several years, and can do everything
    > from the basics to 'disaster recovery' - I recently was handed a shot
    > that a couple took on their honeymoon, in which the camera was placed
    > incorrectly and then the groom ran into the shot. The top of his head
    > was cut off, as was the end of the bride's dress. I recovered that shot
    > by adding some real estate to the image, cloning, and some very
    > detailed repainting - to the point that the cIouple is almost baffled
    > with the result. Nice to see.
    >
    > -As well, I'm now getting into framing - I can do everything from
    > building and finishing the wood, to cutting the glass and the
    > matting... Bought a Logan cutter last week, and it'll pay for itself
    > with the 5 double-mat 12x18s that I have planned as a first set.
    >
    > I'm starting to see that I really have all the skills to take pictures,
    > fix and alter pictures, and frame pictures. The markup on custom
    > framing is mortifying, and even after knowing enough to get good rag
    > matting and all that (ie not use crap), I'm still saving about 60% off
    > retail.
    >
    > Is that an unusual combination of skills? I'm really thinking I could
    > make something of this.
    >
    > Obviously, I need a portfolio, and some framing samples that I could
    > show people (which I'm working on)...
    >
    > But for me, as a potential customer, the ability to have a 'one-stop
    > shop', from the shooting to the post-work to the framing, does have its
    > appeal...
    >
    > Any thoughts?? Encouragements? Reality checks? ;-)
    >
    > Thanks!!
     
    Pat, Jun 21, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. BD

    BD Guest


    > Good luck with it.


    Hmmm. No big surprise that the market has no shortage - if _I_ can
    teach myself this kind of thing, there must be scores of others like
    me, with more of a portfolio to boot. I guess I just have to be
    'exceptionally good', or have some kind of angle.

    I won't give up my day job just yet. ;)
     
    BD, Jun 21, 2006
    #3
  4. BD

    Matt Ion Guest

    BD wrote:
    >>Good luck with it.

    >
    >
    > Hmmm. No big surprise that the market has no shortage - if _I_ can
    > teach myself this kind of thing, there must be scores of others like
    > me, with more of a portfolio to boot. I guess I just have to be
    > 'exceptionally good', or have some kind of angle.


    Sometimes that "angle" is as simple as how well you sell youself. This
    is a business where you have to deal directly with your customers and
    what THEY expect to see - if you have the personality for it, that can
    make the biggest difference between you and the jerk down the street
    with the good gear but no "people skills".
     
    Matt Ion, Jun 21, 2006
    #4
  5. BD

    BD Guest

    > the good gear but no "people skills".

    Uranium Committe (UC) pops to mind. Yikes - what a treasure that guy
    must be to work with. ;-)

    Yes, I do recall seeing discussions which suggested that half of the
    challenge is the process of marketing, and I also know that books have
    been written on how to market yourself as a photographer.

    I imagine I should research such stuff over time, as I assess the
    viability of the whole prospect, but I expect that just as important
    will be for me to just keep on shooting, getting better at it, and
    building a body of work. But I'm not the sort to just go out and shoot
    for the sake of shooting - I really do need to work on that. ;-)
     
    BD, Jun 21, 2006
    #5
  6. BD

    Doug Mitton Guest

    "BD" <> wrote:

    >Hey all...
    >
    >So I've been shooting with decent gear for only a couple of years. I've
    >gotten a lot of very positive feedback on some of my work, and have
    >been told numerous times that I could make money at it.
    >
    >But, I also know that nowadays, decent camera gear is accessible enough
    >that anyone with a little money and a little talent can do decent work.
    >
    >Over the last while, however, some additional things are beginning to
    >gel in my mind:
    >
    >-I've been a Photoshop user for several years, and can do everything
    >from the basics to 'disaster recovery' - I recently was handed a shot
    >that a couple took on their honeymoon, in which the camera was placed
    >incorrectly and then the groom ran into the shot. The top of his head
    >was cut off, as was the end of the bride's dress. I recovered that shot
    >by adding some real estate to the image, cloning, and some very
    >detailed repainting - to the point that the couple is almost baffled
    >with the result. Nice to see.
    >
    >-As well, I'm now getting into framing - I can do everything from
    >building and finishing the wood, to cutting the glass and the
    >matting... Bought a Logan cutter last week, and it'll pay for itself
    >with the 5 double-mat 12x18s that I have planned as a first set.
    >
    >I'm starting to see that I really have all the skills to take pictures,
    >fix and alter pictures, and frame pictures. The markup on custom
    >framing is mortifying, and even after knowing enough to get good rag
    >matting and all that (ie not use crap), I'm still saving about 60% off
    >retail.
    >
    >Is that an unusual combination of skills? I'm really thinking I could
    >make something of this.
    >
    >Obviously, I need a portfolio, and some framing samples that I could
    >show people (which I'm working on)...
    >
    >But for me, as a potential customer, the ability to have a 'one-stop
    >shop', from the shooting to the post-work to the framing, does have its
    >appeal...
    >
    >Any thoughts?? Encouragements? Reality checks? ;-)
    >
    >Thanks!!


    I have many years experince in a technical field ... I seem to think
    that this joke says it all very clearly ...

    http://www.jokesplace.com/joke/retiredengineer.html

    Hope you agree! :)
    --
    ------------------------------------------------
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/dmitton
    SPAM Reduction: Remove "x." from my domain.
    ------------------------------------------------

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    Doug Mitton, Jun 21, 2006
    #6
  7. BD

    BD Guest

    > Hope you agree! :)

    Very much so. I'm an Oracle DBA in real life, so I totally see that.
    ;-))
     
    BD, Jun 21, 2006
    #7
  8. BD wrote:
    > Hey all...
    >
    > So I've been shooting with decent gear for only a couple of years. I've
    > gotten a lot of very positive feedback on some of my work, and have
    > been told numerous times that I could make money at it.
    >


    Its an old wisdom that, at the end of your days, its not the things you
    did that you regret, its the things you *didn't* do.

    Don't burn any bridges, start part-time. But go for it!

    My .02c...

    /M
     
    Moro Grubb of Little Delving, Jun 22, 2006
    #8
  9. BD

    J. Clarke Guest

    BD wrote:

    > Hey all...
    >
    > So I've been shooting with decent gear for only a couple of years. I've
    > gotten a lot of very positive feedback on some of my work, and have
    > been told numerous times that I could make money at it.
    >
    > But, I also know that nowadays, decent camera gear is accessible enough
    > that anyone with a little money and a little talent can do decent work.
    >
    > Over the last while, however, some additional things are beginning to
    > gel in my mind:
    >
    > -I've been a Photoshop user for several years, and can do everything
    > from the basics to 'disaster recovery' - I recently was handed a shot
    > that a couple took on their honeymoon, in which the camera was placed
    > incorrectly and then the groom ran into the shot. The top of his head
    > was cut off, as was the end of the bride's dress. I recovered that shot
    > by adding some real estate to the image, cloning, and some very
    > detailed repainting - to the point that the couple is almost baffled
    > with the result. Nice to see.
    >
    > -As well, I'm now getting into framing - I can do everything from
    > building and finishing the wood, to cutting the glass and the
    > matting... Bought a Logan cutter last week, and it'll pay for itself
    > with the 5 double-mat 12x18s that I have planned as a first set.
    >
    > I'm starting to see that I really have all the skills to take pictures,
    > fix and alter pictures, and frame pictures. The markup on custom
    > framing is mortifying, and even after knowing enough to get good rag
    > matting and all that (ie not use crap), I'm still saving about 60% off
    > retail.
    >
    > Is that an unusual combination of skills? I'm really thinking I could
    > make something of this.
    >
    > Obviously, I need a portfolio, and some framing samples that I could
    > show people (which I'm working on)...
    >
    > But for me, as a potential customer, the ability to have a 'one-stop
    > shop', from the shooting to the post-work to the framing, does have its
    > appeal...
    >
    > Any thoughts?? Encouragements? Reality checks? ;-)


    Getting the word out that you are in the business, and do quality work is
    the hard part. There were many, many nerds hacking together computers in
    their dorm rooms when Michael Dell started doing it. What set him apart
    wasn't the excellence of his computers, which were pretty much like
    everybody elses, it was the excellence of his marketing and business
    management.

    Most small business owners don't understand this--you can be the greatest
    photographer (or programmer or mechanic or basket weaver or whatever) in
    the world but if the only people who know about it are you and your cat
    you're going to starve.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Jun 22, 2006
    #9
  10. BD

    Matt Ion Guest

    BD wrote:
    >>the good gear but no "people skills".

    >
    >
    > Uranium Committe (UC) pops to mind. Yikes - what a treasure that guy
    > must be to work with. ;-)
    >
    > Yes, I do recall seeing discussions which suggested that half of the
    > challenge is the process of marketing, and I also know that books have
    > been written on how to market yourself as a photographer.


    Yeah, but a book can only give so much. Your UC buddy probably read the
    same books. :)
     
    Matt Ion, Jun 22, 2006
    #10
  11. BD

    Pat Guest

    People skills are extremely important, both in sales and in taking
    pictures. People skill might be even more important than technical
    skills.

    To expand on my previous comments, the first thing you need to do is
    assess your skills, personality, desired workload and what it is you
    want to do. There is a world of difference between being the next
    Ansel Adams and a wedding photographer. So do what you enjoy doing.
    If it's weddings, go volunteer to do some, even if you have to go to a
    poor church in a poor neighborhood where the people can't afford a
    "real" photographer. Whatever you do, you need to find a way to
    practice it.

    Finally, don't oversell yourself. Explain what you do and what your
    style is. At the same time, find out what makes you different than the
    guy down the street.

    Good luck.

    Pat.

    BD wrote:
    > > Good luck with it.

    >
    > Hmmm. No big surprise that the market has no shortage - if _I_ can
    > teach myself this kind of thing, there must be scores of others like
    > me, with more of a portfolio to boot. I guess I just have to be
    > 'exceptionally good', or have some kind of angle.
    >
    > I won't give up my day job just yet. ;)
     
    Pat, Jun 22, 2006
    #11
  12. BD

    Dmac Guest

    BD wrote:
    > Hey all...
    >
    > So I've been shooting with decent gear for only a couple of years. I've
    > gotten a lot of very positive feedback on some of my work, and have
    > been told numerous times that I could make money at it.
    >

    snipped
    >
    > Is that an unusual combination of skills? I'm really thinking I could
    > make something of this.
    >
    > Obviously, I need a portfolio, and some framing samples that I could
    > show people (which I'm working on)...
    >
    > But for me, as a potential customer, the ability to have a 'one-stop
    > shop', from the shooting to the post-work to the framing, does have its
    > appeal...
    >
    > Any thoughts?? Encouragements? Reality checks? ;-)
    >
    > Thanks!!
    >

    The concept that being good at what you do is enough to found a business
    on is flawed in the extreme. If you'd started off by saying you had a
    brilliant idea for how to *RUN* a photographic business or a great idea
    for something new in the photography business, I might not be so cynical.

    Every year for the past 6 years, I have trained at least one (usually
    two) camera persons to do my Santa shoots. Every year I have to compete
    with last year's trainee to get the site because they think being able
    to do it and having the same camera as I used last year, is enough. It's
    not.

    You're only partly on the ball when you say anyone can buy a digicam and
    get good shots. Good as in clear, correctly exposed pictures, maybe. It
    takes a little more than a digicam and confidence to take 150 wedding
    photos and not discard any for one reason or another.

    It also takes a lot of dedication to tasks like publicity letters and
    book keeping as well as keeping up with and inventing new ways to
    exploit your business.

    Picture framers are a dime a dozen. Anyone with a couple of grand can
    buy a chomp machine and make perfectly aligned frames. This is even more
    likely than with losing work to another photographer.

    I can't tell you how to be successful at business. What I can tell you
    is some hard information you would do well to listen to...

    1. Too many people are so busy making a living, they don't have time to
    make any money! (circa 1962)

    2. If you limit your income potential to selling only what you make with
    your own hands, you'll never make much unless you get into artificial
    hearts. Circa 1968)

    3. If you are not able to manage business accounts now. Learn before
    going any further or you'll end up broke. (Circa 1969)

    4. If you don't charge enough to be able to replace your gear as it
    wears out, you'll go broke as sure as if you spend your time drinking
    pinacolada on the beach with pretty women... You decide which is better
    and learn how to "Rip people off" according to the rabble in these
    groups. Only then, will you make a decent living. (Circa 2006)

    I just replaced $160,000 worth of printers and cameras... My profit from
    the past 2 years. All gone... Start again.

    Prices up, so sorry but long after you've finished choking on my price,
    you'll find joy in looking at what you go for it!!!

    --
    From Douglas...
    My photographic site: http://www.douglasjames.com.au
    Canvas Archival and Metallic Prints: http://www.canvasphotos.com.au
     
    Dmac, Jun 22, 2006
    #12
  13. BD

    Backbone Guest

    "BD" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey all...
    >
    > So I've been shooting with decent gear for only a couple of years. I've
    > gotten a lot of very positive feedback on some of my work, and have
    > been told numerous times that I could make money at it.
    >
    > But, I also know that nowadays, decent camera gear is accessible enough
    > that anyone with a little money and a little talent can do decent work.
    >
    > Over the last while, however, some additional things are beginning to
    > gel in my mind:
    >
    > -I've been a Photoshop user for several years, and can do everything
    > from the basics to 'disaster recovery' - I recently was handed a shot
    > that a couple took on their honeymoon, in which the camera was placed
    > incorrectly and then the groom ran into the shot. The top of his head
    > was cut off, as was the end of the bride's dress. I recovered that shot
    > by adding some real estate to the image, cloning, and some very
    > detailed repainting - to the point that the couple is almost baffled
    > with the result. Nice to see.
    >
    > -As well, I'm now getting into framing - I can do everything from
    > building and finishing the wood, to cutting the glass and the
    > matting... Bought a Logan cutter last week, and it'll pay for itself
    > with the 5 double-mat 12x18s that I have planned as a first set.
    >
    > I'm starting to see that I really have all the skills to take pictures,
    > fix and alter pictures, and frame pictures. The markup on custom
    > framing is mortifying, and even after knowing enough to get good rag
    > matting and all that (ie not use crap), I'm still saving about 60% off
    > retail.
    >
    > Is that an unusual combination of skills? I'm really thinking I could
    > make something of this.
    >
    > Obviously, I need a portfolio, and some framing samples that I could
    > show people (which I'm working on)...
    >
    > But for me, as a potential customer, the ability to have a 'one-stop
    > shop', from the shooting to the post-work to the framing, does have its
    > appeal...
    >
    > Any thoughts?? Encouragements? Reality checks? ;-)


    Your may perhaps need to advertise yourself - best place to start is with a
    good modeling book that contains Model agency addresses as well as Modeling
    agency e-mails addresses. This is a great place to start even if you don't
    shoot models. Modeling Agency's primary goal is to increase their profits -
    send them samples of your work. If anything is appealing they will send you
    to the right people. An acceptable image should read as follows:
    XX_thepond.jpg XX is your first and last name initial, followed by the name
    of your image.
     
    Backbone, Jun 22, 2006
    #13
  14. In article <>, BD
    <> wrote:

    > Any thoughts?? Encouragements? Reality checks? ;-)


    Ever think of learning about lighting and posing?
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Jun 22, 2006
    #14
  15. BD

    Pat Guest

    Dmac wrote:
    > BD wrote:
    > > Hey all...
    > >
    > > So I've been shooting with decent gear for only a couple of years. I've
    > > gotten a lot of very positive feedback on some of my work, and have
    > > been told numerous times that I could make money at it.
    > >

    > snipped
    > >
    > > Is that an unusual combination of skills? I'm really thinking I could
    > > make something of this.
    > >
    > > Obviously, I need a portfolio, and some framing samples that I could
    > > show people (which I'm working on)...
    > >
    > > But for me, as a potential customer, the ability to have a 'one-stop
    > > shop', from the shooting to the post-work to the framing, does have its
    > > appeal...
    > >
    > > Any thoughts?? Encouragements? Reality checks? ;-)
    > >
    > > Thanks!!
    > >

    > The concept that being good at what you do is enough to found a business
    > on is flawed in the extreme. If you'd started off by saying you had a
    > brilliant idea for how to *RUN* a photographic business or a great idea
    > for something new in the photography business, I might not be so cynical.
    >
    > Every year for the past 6 years, I have trained at least one (usually
    > two) camera persons to do my Santa shoots. Every year I have to compete
    > with last year's trainee to get the site because they think being able
    > to do it and having the same camera as I used last year, is enough. It's
    > not.
    >
    > You're only partly on the ball when you say anyone can buy a digicam and
    > get good shots. Good as in clear, correctly exposed pictures, maybe. It
    > takes a little more than a digicam and confidence to take 150 wedding
    > photos and not discard any for one reason or another.
    >
    > It also takes a lot of dedication to tasks like publicity letters and
    > book keeping as well as keeping up with and inventing new ways to
    > exploit your business.
    >
    > Picture framers are a dime a dozen. Anyone with a couple of grand can
    > buy a chomp machine and make perfectly aligned frames. This is even more
    > likely than with losing work to another photographer.
    >
    > I can't tell you how to be successful at business. What I can tell you
    > is some hard information you would do well to listen to...
    >
    > 1. Too many people are so busy making a living, they don't have time to
    > make any money! (circa 1962)
    >
    > 2. If you limit your income potential to selling only what you make with
    > your own hands, you'll never make much unless you get into artificial
    > hearts. Circa 1968)
    >
    > 3. If you are not able to manage business accounts now. Learn before
    > going any further or you'll end up broke. (Circa 1969)
    >
    > 4. If you don't charge enough to be able to replace your gear as it
    > wears out, you'll go broke as sure as if you spend your time drinking
    > pinacolada on the beach with pretty women... You decide which is better
    > and learn how to "Rip people off" according to the rabble in these
    > groups. Only then, will you make a decent living. (Circa 2006)
    >
    > I just replaced $160,000 worth of printers and cameras... My profit from
    > the past 2 years. All gone... Start again.
    >
    > Prices up, so sorry but long after you've finished choking on my price,
    > you'll find joy in looking at what you go for it!!!
    >
    > --
    > From Douglas...
    > My photographic site: http://www.douglasjames.com.au
    > Canvas Archival and Metallic Prints: http://www.canvasphotos.com.au


    5. Have your Santa shooters sign non-compete clauses and remind them
    on the last day of employment remind them of it.
     
    Pat, Jun 22, 2006
    #15
  16. BD

    Matt Guest

    Shooting Mamie

    Gosh, sounds like you've got a lot of options. Have you found a subject
    area that really interests you? You have to shoot what you love. And
    remember the old adage, it's not what you know; it's who you know. I've
    only been photographing for six years. But right from the get-go, I had
    my subject matter and fell in love with it--mid-century modern motel
    signs. Come to think about it mid-century modern anything. Here's one
    of my shoots, I think you'll find it quite
    humorous...http://digitalartphotographyfordumm.../art-gallery-show-at-m-modern-gallery_15.html
    Again, find what you like, meet people who like the same things you do
    and shoot away for pay.
    BD wrote:
    > Hey all...
    >
    > So I've been shooting with decent gear for only a couple of years. I've
    > gotten a lot of very positive feedback on some of my work, and have
    > been told numerous times that I could make money at it.
    >
    > But, I also know that nowadays, decent camera gear is accessible enough
    > that anyone with a little money and a little talent can do decent work.
    >
    > Over the last while, however, some additional things are beginning to
    > gel in my mind:
    >
    > -I've been a Photoshop user for several years, and can do everything
    > from the basics to 'disaster recovery' - I recently was handed a shot
    > that a couple took on their honeymoon, in which the camera was placed
    > incorrectly and then the groom ran into the shot. The top of his head
    > was cut off, as was the end of the bride's dress. I recovered that shot
    > by adding some real estate to the image, cloning, and some very
    > detailed repainting - to the point that the couple is almost baffled
    > with the result. Nice to see.
    >
    > -As well, I'm now getting into framing - I can do everything from
    > building and finishing the wood, to cutting the glass and the
    > matting... Bought a Logan cutter last week, and it'll pay for itself
    > with the 5 double-mat 12x18s that I have planned as a first set.
    >
    > I'm starting to see that I really have all the skills to take pictures,
    > fix and alter pictures, and frame pictures. The markup on custom
    > framing is mortifying, and even after knowing enough to get good rag
    > matting and all that (ie not use crap), I'm still saving about 60% off
    > retail.
    >
    > Is that an unusual combination of skills? I'm really thinking I could
    > make something of this.
    >
    > Obviously, I need a portfolio, and some framing samples that I could
    > show people (which I'm working on)...
    >
    > But for me, as a potential customer, the ability to have a 'one-stop
    > shop', from the shooting to the post-work to the framing, does have its
    > appeal...
    >
    > Any thoughts?? Encouragements? Reality checks? ;-)
    >
    > Thanks!!
     
    Matt, Jun 22, 2006
    #16
  17. BD

    Bill K Guest

    --
    You've gotten a lot of a good advice, BD. I think you should pursue
    your passion or you will always regret not doing it. I suggest a good
    business plan and remember the importance of customer service. I know
    a lot of professional photographers who are very talented but wouldn't
    deal with because of their arrogance.

    Good luck

    Bill in Lake Charles
     
    Bill K, Jun 22, 2006
    #17
  18. BD

    Jimbo Guest

    BD wrote:
    > Hey all...
    >
    > So I've been shooting with decent gear for only a couple of years. I've
    > gotten a lot of very positive feedback on some of my work, and have
    > been told numerous times that I could make money at it.


    Told by who - friends and family or professional photographers?

    > -I've been a Photoshop user for several years, and can do everything
    > from the basics to 'disaster recovery'



    > -As well, I'm now getting into framing - I can do everything from
    > building and finishing the wood, to cutting the glass and the
    > matting...


    > Is that an unusual combination of skills? I'm really thinking I could
    > make something of this.


    Where's your strength - shooting, photo rework, or framing? Concentrate
    where you are best and what will have the highest profit margin.

    > Obviously, I need a portfolio,


    You need a book or two.

    > and some framing samples that I could show people (which I'm working on)...


    Obviously!
     
    Jimbo, Jun 22, 2006
    #18
  19. BD

    BD Guest


    > Ever think of learning about lighting and posing?


    Of course. That was the point of a recent shoot - I wanted to
    experiment with certain lighting techniques I'd been researching, some
    of which worked quite effectively. Clearly, I need more practice. But
    yes.
     
    BD, Jun 22, 2006
    #19
  20. BD

    Frank ess Guest

    Re: Shooting Mamie

    Matt wrote:
    > Gosh, sounds like you've got a lot of options. Have you found a
    > subject area that really interests you? You have to shoot what you
    > love. And remember the old adage, it's not what you know; it's who
    > you know. I've only been photographing for six years. But right from
    > the get-go, I had my subject matter and fell in love with
    > it--mid-century modern motel signs. Come to think about it
    > mid-century modern anything. Here's one of my shoots, I think you'll
    > find it quite
    > humorous...http://digitalartphotographyfordumm.../art-gallery-show-at-m-modern-gallery_15.html


    Shooting Mamie?

    Beat you to it:
    http://home.san.rr.com/fsheff/mamie00.htm

    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Jun 22, 2006
    #20
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