Things have moved on a bit

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by GraB, Feb 8, 2004.

  1. GraB

    GraB Guest

    http://www.duxcw.com/digest/guides/hd/hd2.htm

    First hard drive, 5Mb capacity, had fifty 24in discs. (I wonder if
    you could see the data?)

    In 1980, Seagate Technology introduced the first hard disk drive for
    microcomputers, the ST506. It was a full height (twice as high as
    most current 5 1/4" drives) 5 1/4" drive, with a stepper motor, and
    held 5 Mbytes. My first hard disk drive was an ST506. I cannot
    remember exactly how much it cost, but it plus its enclosure, etc. was
    well over a thousand dollars. It took me three years to fill the
    drive.

    The world's first gigabyte-capacity disk drive, the IBM 3380,
    introduced in 1980, was the size of a refrigerator, weighed 550 pounds
    (about 250 kg), and had a price tag of $40,000.
    GraB, Feb 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. GraB

    steve Guest

    GraB wrote:

    > http://www.duxcw.com/digest/guides/hd/hd2.htm
    >
    > First hard drive, 5Mb capacity, had fifty 24in discs. (I wonder if
    > you could see the data?)
    >
    > In 1980, Seagate Technology introduced the first hard disk drive for
    > microcomputers, the ST506. It was a full height (twice as high as
    > most current 5 1/4" drives) 5 1/4" drive, with a stepper motor, and
    > held 5 Mbytes. My first hard disk drive was an ST506. I cannot
    > remember exactly how much it cost, but it plus its enclosure, etc. was
    > well over a thousand dollars. It took me three years to fill the
    > drive.
    >
    > The world's first gigabyte-capacity disk drive, the IBM 3380,
    > introduced in 1980, was the size of a refrigerator, weighed 550 pounds
    > (about 250 kg), and had a price tag of $40,000.


    Omigawd.....I've used both of those....I use to be a mainframe computer
    operator...and can remember when the 3380s were "new"....having replaced
    the 3375s and the earlier 3350s we still had. I just missed the earlier
    removeable 3330's....but I've seen them in operation elsewhere. :)
    steve, Feb 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. GraB

    Enkidu Guest

    On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 09:22:47 +1300, steve <>
    wrote:

    >GraB wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.duxcw.com/digest/guides/hd/hd2.htm
    >>
    >> First hard drive, 5Mb capacity, had fifty 24in discs. (I wonder if
    >> you could see the data?)
    >>
    >> In 1980, Seagate Technology introduced the first hard disk drive for
    >> microcomputers, the ST506. It was a full height (twice as high as
    >> most current 5 1/4" drives) 5 1/4" drive, with a stepper motor, and
    >> held 5 Mbytes. My first hard disk drive was an ST506. I cannot
    >> remember exactly how much it cost, but it plus its enclosure, etc. was
    >> well over a thousand dollars. It took me three years to fill the
    >> drive.
    >>
    >> The world's first gigabyte-capacity disk drive, the IBM 3380,
    >> introduced in 1980, was the size of a refrigerator, weighed 550 pounds
    >> (about 250 kg), and had a price tag of $40,000.

    >
    >Omigawd.....I've used both of those....I use to be a mainframe computer
    >operator...and can remember when the 3380s were "new"....having replaced
    >the 3375s and the earlier 3350s we still had. I just missed the earlier
    >removeable 3330's....but I've seen them in operation elsewhere. :)
    >

    Hehe! We had *banks* of them. Well, the drives, because the disks
    themselves were removable. Incidentally google for "IBM" and "3330"
    and get a surprise!

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00005AK77/103-4249033-7679864?v=glance

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    I think that Don Brash is a Labour mole.
    That would explain everything.
    Enkidu, Feb 9, 2004
    #3
  4. GraB

    pete Guest

    On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 20:14:54 +1300, Enkidu wrote:

    > On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 09:22:47 +1300, steve <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>GraB wrote:
    >>
    >>> http://www.duxcw.com/digest/guides/hd/hd2.htm
    >>>
    >>> First hard drive, 5Mb capacity, had fifty 24in discs. (I wonder if
    >>> you could see the data?)
    >>>
    >>> In 1980, Seagate Technology introduced the first hard disk drive for
    >>> microcomputers, the ST506. It was a full height (twice as high as
    >>> most current 5 1/4" drives) 5 1/4" drive, with a stepper motor, and
    >>> held 5 Mbytes. My first hard disk drive was an ST506. I cannot
    >>> remember exactly how much it cost, but it plus its enclosure, etc. was
    >>> well over a thousand dollars. It took me three years to fill the
    >>> drive.
    >>>
    >>> The world's first gigabyte-capacity disk drive, the IBM 3380,
    >>> introduced in 1980, was the size of a refrigerator, weighed 550 pounds
    >>> (about 250 kg), and had a price tag of $40,000.

    >>
    >>Omigawd.....I've used both of those....I use to be a mainframe computer
    >>operator...and can remember when the 3380s were "new"....having replaced
    >>the 3375s and the earlier 3350s we still had. I just missed the earlier
    >>removeable 3330's....but I've seen them in operation elsewhere. :)
    >>

    > Hehe! We had *banks* of them. Well, the drives, because the disks
    > themselves were removable. Incidentally google for "IBM" and "3330"
    > and get a surprise!
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00005AK77/103-4249033-7679864?v=glance
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff

    I was told a story about the removable drive packs - sometimes the brakes
    would fail, so the disks kept spinning long after they shuld have stopped.
    Apparently watching an operator remove a pack which was still spinning
    (inside its enclosure) was quite funny as the op attempted to prevent the
    pack from going into orbit. Jerry (Ex IBM guy who posts here from time to
    time) could confirm.
    pete, Feb 9, 2004
    #4
  5. GraB

    Don Hills Guest

    In article <1bu9rc2tmjd93.hfrthqggc261$>,
    pete <> wrote:
    >I was told a story about the removable drive packs - sometimes the brakes
    >would fail, so the disks kept spinning long after they shuld have stopped.
    >Apparently watching an operator remove a pack which was still spinning
    >(inside its enclosure) was quite funny as the op attempted to prevent the
    >pack from going into orbit. Jerry (Ex IBM guy who posts here from time to
    >time) could confirm.


    Not 3330s, Pete. They were the ones where you slid a round cover down over
    the disk pack, then rotated it to simultaneously lock the cover to the pack
    and unlock the pack from the drive spindle. You couldn't do that if they
    were spinning. The 3340/3350 had a different design where the pack (and the
    heads) were permanently mounted inside the cover. These could, in theory, be
    removed while spinning if various interlocks failed. I seem to recall they
    were called "Starship Enterprise" drives, because the pack somewhat
    resembled the shape of the main (saucer part) of the Enterprise from Star
    Trek.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "I don't use Linux. I prefer to use an OS supported by a large multi-
    national vendor, with a good office suite, excellent network/internet
    software and decent hardware support."
    Don Hills, Feb 10, 2004
    #5
  6. GraB

    Enkidu Guest

    On Mon, 9 Feb 2004 22:52:27 +1300, pete <> wrote:
    >
    >I was told a story about the removable drive packs - sometimes the brakes
    >would fail, so the disks kept spinning long after they shuld have stopped.
    >Apparently watching an operator remove a pack which was still spinning
    >(inside its enclosure) was quite funny as the op attempted to prevent the
    >pack from going into orbit. Jerry (Ex IBM guy who posts here from time to
    >time) could confirm.
    >

    I think there were interlocks that would stop that. Anyway, I never
    saw one running if the drawer opened. Sometimes you could spin the
    handle and lift and only the spindle would come out (though the drive
    had to be pretty far gone for that to happen).

    Speaking of IBM guys <grin> I recall one engineer opened the bottom
    drawer of a 3330 drive and was working on the lower drive when
    suddenly the top drawer came out and hit him on the side of the head.
    It was funny in retrospect but at the time.... do you know how heavy
    those things were? There were supposed to be interlocks to stop both
    drawers coming out at the same time, because of the possibility of the
    whole thing toppling over.

    I remember walking past one drive which was making a funny noise, and
    I said something on the lines of "Hey, I think drive is going to -"
    when there was a crack or a bang and the curved transparent plastic
    front was suddenly rust brown.....

    Cheers,

    Cliff


    --

    I think that Don Brash is a Labour mole.
    That would explain everything.
    Enkidu, Feb 10, 2004
    #6
  7. In article <>,
    Enkidu <> wrote:

    >Speaking of IBM guys <grin> I recall one engineer opened the bottom
    >drawer of a 3330 drive and was working on the lower drive when
    >suddenly the top drawer came out and hit him on the side of the head.
    >It was funny in retrospect but at the time.... do you know how heavy
    >those things were? There were supposed to be interlocks to stop both
    >drawers coming out at the same time, because of the possibility of the
    >whole thing toppling over.


    Sounds similar to this extract from the Six Stages of Field Service
    Support <http://nemesis.lonestar.org/stories/stages.html>:

    You are not in Stage One if the FSE was performing PM on your system
    and when you returned from lunch, you found your entire VAX 11/780
    tilting at a 45-degree angle, with the FSE desperately trying to get
    the system back upright or at least trying to keep it from tilting
    any further. This actually happened once in my presence - something
    about not extending those stabilizer legs before opening all of the
    cabinets. Now, if the system does tip completely over, then you get
    to go to Stage One, right after the FSE goes to the hospital.

    Lawrence "BTW, MPLS VPNs don't only do IP AFAIK, but YMMV" D'Oliveiro
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 10, 2004
    #7
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