Thermal Compound application

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by toronado455, Jun 23, 2006.

  1. toronado455

    toronado455 Guest

    When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied to
    both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or just
    the CPU?
     
    toronado455, Jun 23, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. toronado455 wrote:
    > When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied to
    > both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or just
    > the CPU?


    What's an HSF? Anyhow, I don't think it'd make any difference how it's
    applied, since it'll get squished between the two.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Jun 23, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. toronado455 <>, the gumming-good-for-nothing and
    buck-toothed team player who likes craven queer fishing with boa
    constrictors, and whose partner is a moll with a bald-headed festering
    wound, wrote in <>:
    > When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied to
    > both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or just
    > the CPU?


    Assuming you want to build something that lasts and doesn't overheat you'll
    have to do things properly.

    Many cheap and nasty heatsinks come with a pad stuck to them, you'll want to
    remove all traces of that first.
    Use a credit card or a wooden scraper to remove as much as you can and then
    use some lint-free cloths and either acetone or isopropyl-alcohol to remove
    the remainder.

    You'll want to use a good quality thermal compound, I usually use arctic
    silver. They have instructions on their web-site but in a nutshell you
    should apply a thin and uniform layer across the CPU die, again you can use
    a credit card to help achieve this.
    Whatever compound is left on the tool you applied it with can be put onto
    the bottom of the heatsink and polished in with a clean, lint-free cloth.

    You would at that stage have both surfaces prepared and ready for assembly.

    Ignore anything written by stupid cunts like "roger", the aim isn't to
    squash anything between the two surfaces at all but to fill all the troughs
    in the surfaces with something that will conduct heat from one to the other
    as efficiently as possible.



    --
    Lunch was nice;
    Fried north american porcupine furuncle with imperfect live rat embryos
    and amphibian labia conserve, cooked in a steaming casserole brimming
    with exotic squares of rutabaga, parsley and lobster in sour calamari
    broth, a side of hedgehog pancreas and a keg of penile secretions.
     
    Banned Apache, Jun 23, 2006
    #3
  4. toronado455

    Al Pilarcik Guest

    toronado455 wrote:
    > When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied to
    > both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or just
    > the CPU?




    The first step is to remove the existing thermal pad using 99% isopropyl
    alcohol and a credit card or plastic scraper.

    Apply an amount of thermal paste no larger than a grain of rice. Clean the
    scraper and use it to spread the paste. The resulting *translucent* layer
    should entirely cover the metal heat spreader or the raised core in older
    processors. If you can't see through the layer, it's too thick, and will act
    more like an insulator than a conductor of heat. Apply the HSF.
     
    Al Pilarcik, Jun 23, 2006
    #4
  5. Banned Apache wrote:
    > toronado455 <>, the gumming-good-for-nothing and
    > buck-toothed team player who likes craven queer fishing with boa
    > constrictors, and whose partner is a moll with a bald-headed festering
    > wound, wrote in <>:
    >
    >>When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied to
    >>both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or just
    >>the CPU?

    >
    >
    > Assuming you want to build something that lasts and doesn't overheat you'll
    > have to do things properly.
    >
    > Many cheap and nasty heatsinks come with a pad stuck to them, you'll want to
    > remove all traces of that first.
    > Use a credit card or a wooden scraper to remove as much as you can and then
    > use some lint-free cloths and either acetone or isopropyl-alcohol to remove
    > the remainder.
    >
    > You'll want to use a good quality thermal compound, I usually use arctic
    > silver. They have instructions on their web-site but in a nutshell you
    > should apply a thin and uniform layer across the CPU die, again you can use
    > a credit card to help achieve this.
    > Whatever compound is left on the tool you applied it with can be put onto
    > the bottom of the heatsink and polished in with a clean, lint-free cloth.
    >
    > You would at that stage have both surfaces prepared and ready for assembly.
    >
    > Ignore anything written by stupid cunts like "roger", the aim isn't to
    > squash anything between the two surfaces at all but to fill all the troughs
    > in the surfaces with something that will conduct heat from one to the other
    > as efficiently as possible.


    I use Arctic Silver also. And you are a dumb **** too. I can't remember
    why at the moment, but I'm sure you are. **** off with your anal methods
    of applying thermal shit.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Jun 23, 2006
    #5
  6. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?= <>, the buck-toothed-gypsy
    and toupeed camp-bitch who likes tasteless one handed clapping with
    mongooses, and whose partner is a rent-girl with a denuded fuffle, wrote
    in <>:
    > Banned Apache wrote:
    >> toronado455 <>, the gumming-good-for-nothing and
    >> buck-toothed team player who likes craven queer fishing with boa
    >> constrictors, and whose partner is a moll with a bald-headed
    >> festering wound, wrote in
    >> <>:
    >>> When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied
    >>> to both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or
    >>> just the CPU?

    >>
    >>
    >> Assuming you want to build something that lasts and doesn't overheat
    >> you'll have to do things properly.
    >>
    >> Many cheap and nasty heatsinks come with a pad stuck to them, you'll
    >> want to remove all traces of that first.
    >> Use a credit card or a wooden scraper to remove as much as you can
    >> and then use some lint-free cloths and either acetone or
    >> isopropyl-alcohol to remove the remainder.
    >>
    >> You'll want to use a good quality thermal compound, I usually use
    >> arctic silver. They have instructions on their web-site but in a
    >> nutshell you should apply a thin and uniform layer across the CPU
    >> die, again you can use a credit card to help achieve this.
    >> Whatever compound is left on the tool you applied it with can be put
    >> onto the bottom of the heatsink and polished in with a clean,
    >> lint-free cloth. You would at that stage have both surfaces prepared and
    >> ready for
    >> assembly. Ignore anything written by stupid cunts like "roger", the aim
    >> isn't
    >> to squash anything between the two surfaces at all but to fill all
    >> the troughs in the surfaces with something that will conduct heat
    >> from one to the other as efficiently as possible.

    >
    > I use Arctic Silver also. And you are a dumb **** too. I can't
    > remember why at the moment, but I'm sure you are. **** off with your
    > anal methods of applying thermal shit.


    I guess you're too cack-handed to do a proper job, so you hide behind your
    stupidity.
    Nevermind.



    --
    Lunch was nice;
    Foul-stinking northern fur seal abscess with bladder extract garnished
    with limp coon cat running sore with tendon extract, cooked in a
    splashing saucepan brimming with big specks of carrot and brussel sprout
    in tea, a side of crustacean and a demitasse of pap smear scrapings.
     
    Banned Apache, Jun 23, 2006
    #6
  7. Al Pilarcik <>, the drivelling-riffraff and
    toffee-nosed mud snake who likes demeaning crank yanking with catfishes,
    and whose partner is a joy-sister with a contagious sword swallower,
    wrote in <449bb119$0$11086$>:
    > toronado455 wrote:
    >> When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied
    >> to both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or
    >> just the CPU?

    >
    >
    >
    > The first step is to remove the existing thermal pad using 99%
    > isopropyl alcohol and a credit card or plastic scraper.
    >
    > Apply an amount of thermal paste no larger than a grain of rice.
    > Clean the scraper and use it to spread the paste. The resulting
    > *translucent* layer should entirely cover the metal heat spreader or
    > the raised core in older processors. If you can't see through the
    > layer, it's too thick, and will act more like an insulator than a
    > conductor of heat. Apply the HSF.


    Well done Pilarck.



    --
    Lunch was nice;
    Thrown away grizzly bear tail next to totaled erupting pimples and corn
    preserve accentuated by bloody earwax balls under foul heads of lettuce
    and chihuahua puddings marinade in doomed ringtail monkey pimple and
    house sparrow breast conserve con cooked enough boa constrictor
    infection and turkey tripe compote, dished up in a gurgling pot brimming
    with imported uncooked peanut and hodgepodge of scallion in rat piss, a
    side of quetzal rectum carcinoma and a drink of horned toad vaginal
    secretions.
     
    Banned Apache, Jun 23, 2006
    #7
  8. Banned Apache wrote:
    > =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?= <>, the buck-toothed-gypsy
    > and toupeed camp-bitch who likes tasteless one handed clapping with
    > mongooses, and whose partner is a rent-girl with a denuded fuffle, wrote
    > in <>:
    >
    >>Banned Apache wrote:
    >>
    >>>toronado455 <>, the gumming-good-for-nothing and
    >>>buck-toothed team player who likes craven queer fishing with boa
    >>>constrictors, and whose partner is a moll with a bald-headed
    >>>festering wound, wrote in
    >>><>:
    >>>
    >>>>When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied
    >>>>to both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or
    >>>>just the CPU?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Assuming you want to build something that lasts and doesn't overheat
    >>>you'll have to do things properly.
    >>>
    >>>Many cheap and nasty heatsinks come with a pad stuck to them, you'll
    >>>want to remove all traces of that first.
    >>>Use a credit card or a wooden scraper to remove as much as you can
    >>>and then use some lint-free cloths and either acetone or
    >>>isopropyl-alcohol to remove the remainder.
    >>>
    >>>You'll want to use a good quality thermal compound, I usually use
    >>>arctic silver. They have instructions on their web-site but in a
    >>>nutshell you should apply a thin and uniform layer across the CPU
    >>>die, again you can use a credit card to help achieve this.
    >>>Whatever compound is left on the tool you applied it with can be put
    >>>onto the bottom of the heatsink and polished in with a clean,
    >>>lint-free cloth. You would at that stage have both surfaces prepared and
    >>>ready for
    >>>assembly. Ignore anything written by stupid cunts like "roger", the aim
    >>>isn't
    >>>to squash anything between the two surfaces at all but to fill all
    >>>the troughs in the surfaces with something that will conduct heat
    >>>from one to the other as efficiently as possible.

    >>
    >>I use Arctic Silver also. And you are a dumb **** too. I can't
    >>remember why at the moment, but I'm sure you are. **** off with your
    >>anal methods of applying thermal shit.

    >
    >
    > I guess you're too cack-handed to do a proper job, so you hide behind your
    > stupidity.
    > Nevermind.


    I haven't a clue what you just said, so I guess it was either right or
    wrong. But you haven't a clue how to get things done. Just applying some
    thermal compound between a chip and a cooling fan isn't that big a deal.
    Go ahead, call me what you want, you're still looking like a hot-headed
    neophyte.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Jun 23, 2006
    #8
  9. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?= <>, the grizzled-itinerant
    and tongue-tied pork-and-bean who likes lethal wick dipping with
    wildebeests, and whose partner is a street-walker with a sloppy furby,
    wrote in <>:
    > Banned Apache wrote:
    >> =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?= <>, the
    >> buck-toothed-gypsy and toupeed camp-bitch who likes tasteless one
    >> handed clapping with mongooses, and whose partner is a rent-girl
    >> with a denuded fuffle, wrote in
    >> <>:
    >>> Banned Apache wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> toronado455 <>, the gumming-good-for-nothing
    >>>> and buck-toothed team player who likes craven queer fishing with
    >>>> boa constrictors, and whose partner is a moll with a bald-headed
    >>>> festering wound, wrote in
    >>>> <>:
    >>>>
    >>>>> When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be
    >>>>> applied to both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just
    >>>>> the HSF, or just the CPU?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Assuming you want to build something that lasts and doesn't
    >>>> overheat you'll have to do things properly.
    >>>>
    >>>> Many cheap and nasty heatsinks come with a pad stuck to them,
    >>>> you'll want to remove all traces of that first.
    >>>> Use a credit card or a wooden scraper to remove as much as you can
    >>>> and then use some lint-free cloths and either acetone or
    >>>> isopropyl-alcohol to remove the remainder.
    >>>>
    >>>> You'll want to use a good quality thermal compound, I usually use
    >>>> arctic silver. They have instructions on their web-site but in a
    >>>> nutshell you should apply a thin and uniform layer across the CPU
    >>>> die, again you can use a credit card to help achieve this.
    >>>> Whatever compound is left on the tool you applied it with can be
    >>>> put onto the bottom of the heatsink and polished in with a clean,
    >>>> lint-free cloth. You would at that stage have both surfaces
    >>>> prepared and ready for
    >>>> assembly. Ignore anything written by stupid cunts like "roger",
    >>>> the aim isn't
    >>>> to squash anything between the two surfaces at all but to fill all
    >>>> the troughs in the surfaces with something that will conduct heat
    >>>> from one to the other as efficiently as possible.
    >>>
    >>> I use Arctic Silver also. And you are a dumb **** too. I can't
    >>> remember why at the moment, but I'm sure you are. **** off with your
    >>> anal methods of applying thermal shit.

    >>
    >>
    >> I guess you're too cack-handed to do a proper job, so you hide
    >> behind your stupidity.
    >> Nevermind.

    >
    > I haven't a clue

    <snip>

    Agreed.



    --
    Lunch was nice;
    Underdone numbat intestine on top of dishonoured used tampons and anus
    garnish and boiled intestines with prostrate chicken entrails and
    cassowary kidney stones topping accentuated with common otter furuncle
    with cabbage topping garnished with prostrate woodpecker penis garnished
    with creepy weevil excrescence with cabbage conserve, dished up in a
    turbid saucepan containing fatty pieces of beef and morsels of artichoke
    in contaminated crud, a side of fish lung and a keg of coagulated pea
    soup.
     
    Banned Apache, Jun 23, 2006
    #9
  10. toronado455

    Vanguard Guest

    "toronado455" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied to
    > both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or just
    > the CPU?



    Applying thermal paste to both surfaces guarantees that you will apply
    way too much of it. Thermal paste is to fill the gaps and microscopic
    pores of the surfaces that would otherwise be just air. Thermal paste
    transfers heat faster than air but thermal paste is nowhere as efficient
    as metal-to-metal contact. If you lap the heatsink, it will mate better
    with the metal plate on the CPU (I don't recommend lapping the CPU's
    metal plate unless you are willing to replace it should you lap too far
    and weaken or perforate the plate). Fact is, most home jobbers slap way
    too much thermal paste on the heatsink. You are not trying to paint the
    surfaces. You are trying to get it squeezed into the gaps and pores and
    also squeezed out from where the surfaces do mate okay. The layer you
    apply should be almost transparent. Since thermal paste doesn't conduct
    heat as fast as metal, too much thermal paste can REDUCE thermal
    conduction.

    There is no point in applying thermal paste outside the area on the
    heatsink where it makes contact with the metal plate on the CPU. Don't
    go slapping on thermal paste across the entire bottom of the heatsink.
    It only makes contact in the small area of the metal plate on the CPU.
    Apply the paste to the CPU's metal plate. After applying the paste, and
    while mounting the heatsink (so it is pretty much in the position where
    it will get affixed), press down on the heatsink and twist left and
    right or move in a tight circle to spread it around and squeeze out the
    extra paste. You want as much metal-to-metal contact as possible. You
    want to use a MINIMAL amount of thermal paste to get the job done.
    Spread it on thinly. Considering the penchant of home jobbers to apply
    too much, just apply thinly to one surface.

    Unless you are overclocking (and then mostly if you are extremely
    overclocking), the difference between the best and mediocre compounds
    (and even for the thermal pads) provides a difference of only about 1 to
    3 degrees Celsius. Independent testing has proven that the most
    expensive thermal pastes provide only a minor change in [stabilized]
    temperature. If you are overclocking it might be worth the using the
    MUCH more expensive compounds. For *normal* setups (i.e., not
    overclocked), a thermal pad is okay, most generic pastes are okay, there
    are better pastes, like the ceramic ones, but the high-cost ones, like
    Arctic Silver 5 (http://www.arcticsilver.com/as5.htm) or liquid-metal
    (http://www.coollaboratory.com/en/), are a waste of money. The
    differences, if any, between them and lesser pastes is insignificant to
    the normal user and minimal to non-extreme overclockers (e.g.,
    http://reviews.pimprig.com/cooling/coollaboratory_liquid_metal.php?page=2).
    I lump thermal pads in with the low-end pastes, like the plain white
    zinc oxide goop, but something is better than nothing. Most folks that
    decry thermal pads are referring to the old graphite-laden pads but
    newer thermal pads are much better and equal to standard thermal paste.
    I prefer paste since there will be some metal-2-metal contact. I also
    lap my heatsinks (since I overclock a bit but not extreme) and I use the
    better pastes but all I get is all of about a 1 to 3 C improvement.
    Just don't go coating the surfaces with a thick layer of paste. If you
    don't overclock, read the testing articles and you'll see there isn't
    much point in using the pricey thermal pastes.

    When not overclocking, and even then, there is very little difference
    between the expensive Artic Silver 5 and the cheap white zinc oxide
    paste. Where the real difference lies is in their survivability. The
    cheap stuff dries out over time and because less effective whereas the
    better pastes don't. But you don't need to buy the most expensive paste
    which does little, if any, better than a mediocre paste. I've seen
    users spend lots of time and waste lots of money trying to lower their
    CPU by all of 1 to 4 degrees C when the top operational temperature is
    20 to 30 C away. In non-overclocking setups, I've seen no difference in
    temperature between the cheap zinc oxide and the pricey silver-laden
    stuff, especially when differences of 1 or 2 degrees are outside the
    accuracy of the circuits used to measure those temperatures. If your
    system is so sensitive that a change of a couple degrees Celsius
    determines if your system crashes or is unreliable then the paste is not
    the solution. Better cooling is the solution.

    http://www.neoseeker.com/Hardware/faqs/kb/5,61.html
    http://www.dansdata.com/goop.htm
    http://www.heatsink-guide.com/content.php?content=compound.shtml
     
    Vanguard, Jun 23, 2006
    #10
  11. toronado455

    toronado455 Guest

    Al Pilarcik wrote:
    > toronado455 wrote:
    > > When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied to
    > > both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or just
    > > the CPU?

    >
    >
    >
    > The first step is to remove the existing thermal pad using 99% isopropyl
    > alcohol and a credit card or plastic scraper.
    >
    > Apply an amount of thermal paste no larger than a grain of rice. Clean the
    > scraper and use it to spread the paste. The resulting *translucent* layer
    > should entirely cover the metal heat spreader or the raised core in older
    > processors. If you can't see through the layer, it's too thick, and will act
    > more like an insulator than a conductor of heat. Apply the HSF.


    The reason I posted this question is because I see conflicting info.
    Let me see if I can restate my question more clearly:

    Assuming all the stock thermal pad material (if any) has been removed
    from the heatsink, which option is best?

    A. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to the CPU only
    B. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to the heatsink only
    C. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to both the CPU and
    heatsink
     
    toronado455, Jun 23, 2006
    #11
  12. toronado455

    toronado455 Guest

    Thanks for your reply, Vanguard.

    Vanguard wrote:
    > "toronado455" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied to
    > > both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or just
    > > the CPU?

    >
    >
    > Applying thermal paste to both surfaces guarantees that you will apply
    > way too much of it. Thermal paste is to fill the gaps and microscopic
    > pores of the surfaces that would otherwise be just air. Thermal paste
    > transfers heat faster than air but thermal paste is nowhere as efficient
    > as metal-to-metal contact. If you lap the heatsink, it will mate better
    > with the metal plate on the CPU (I don't recommend lapping the CPU's
    > metal plate unless you are willing to replace it should you lap too far
    > and weaken or perforate the plate). Fact is, most home jobbers slap way
    > too much thermal paste on the heatsink. You are not trying to paint the
    > surfaces. You are trying to get it squeezed into the gaps and pores and
    > also squeezed out from where the surfaces do mate okay. The layer you
    > apply should be almost transparent. Since thermal paste doesn't conduct
    > heat as fast as metal, too much thermal paste can REDUCE thermal
    > conduction.
    >
    > There is no point in applying thermal paste outside the area on the
    > heatsink where it makes contact with the metal plate on the CPU. Don't
    > go slapping on thermal paste across the entire bottom of the heatsink.
    > It only makes contact in the small area of the metal plate on the CPU.
    > Apply the paste to the CPU's metal plate. After applying the paste, and
    > while mounting the heatsink (so it is pretty much in the position where
    > it will get affixed), press down on the heatsink and twist left and
    > right or move in a tight circle to spread it around and squeeze out the
    > extra paste.


    Vanguard, I think that works with Intel CPUs, but AMD says to never
    press down on the heatsink while mounting it. What is your opinion on
    that?


    > You want as much metal-to-metal contact as possible. You
    > want to use a MINIMAL amount of thermal paste to get the job done.
    > Spread it on thinly. Considering the penchant of home jobbers to apply
    > too much, just apply thinly to one surface.
    >
    > Unless you are overclocking (and then mostly if you are extremely
    > overclocking), the difference between the best and mediocre compounds
    > (and even for the thermal pads) provides a difference of only about 1 to
    > 3 degrees Celsius. Independent testing has proven that the most
    > expensive thermal pastes provide only a minor change in [stabilized]
    > temperature. If you are overclocking it might be worth the using the
    > MUCH more expensive compounds. For *normal* setups (i.e., not
    > overclocked), a thermal pad is okay, most generic pastes are okay, there
    > are better pastes, like the ceramic ones, but the high-cost ones, like
    > Arctic Silver 5 (http://www.arcticsilver.com/as5.htm) or liquid-metal
    > (http://www.coollaboratory.com/en/), are a waste of money. The
    > differences, if any, between them and lesser pastes is insignificant to
    > the normal user and minimal to non-extreme overclockers (e.g.,
    > http://reviews.pimprig.com/cooling/coollaboratory_liquid_metal.php?page=2).
    > I lump thermal pads in with the low-end pastes, like the plain white
    > zinc oxide goop, but something is better than nothing. Most folks that
    > decry thermal pads are referring to the old graphite-laden pads but
    > newer thermal pads are much better and equal to standard thermal paste.
    > I prefer paste since there will be some metal-2-metal contact. I also
    > lap my heatsinks (since I overclock a bit but not extreme) and I use the
    > better pastes but all I get is all of about a 1 to 3 C improvement.
    > Just don't go coating the surfaces with a thick layer of paste. If you
    > don't overclock, read the testing articles and you'll see there isn't
    > much point in using the pricey thermal pastes.
    >
    > When not overclocking, and even then, there is very little difference
    > between the expensive Artic Silver 5 and the cheap white zinc oxide
    > paste. Where the real difference lies is in their survivability. The
    > cheap stuff dries out over time and because less effective whereas the
    > better pastes don't. But you don't need to buy the most expensive paste
    > which does little, if any, better than a mediocre paste. I've seen
    > users spend lots of time and waste lots of money trying to lower their
    > CPU by all of 1 to 4 degrees C when the top operational temperature is
    > 20 to 30 C away. In non-overclocking setups, I've seen no difference in
    > temperature between the cheap zinc oxide and the pricey silver-laden
    > stuff, especially when differences of 1 or 2 degrees are outside the
    > accuracy of the circuits used to measure those temperatures. If your
    > system is so sensitive that a change of a couple degrees Celsius
    > determines if your system crashes or is unreliable then the paste is not
    > the solution. Better cooling is the solution.
    >
    > http://www.neoseeker.com/Hardware/faqs/kb/5,61.html
    > http://www.dansdata.com/goop.htm
    > http://www.heatsink-guide.com/content.php?content=compound.shtml
     
    toronado455, Jun 23, 2006
    #12
  13. toronado455

    Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:,
    toronado455 spewed forth:
    > Al Pilarcik wrote:
    >> toronado455 wrote:
    >>> When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied
    >>> to both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or
    >>> just the CPU?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> The first step is to remove the existing thermal pad using 99%
    >> isopropyl alcohol and a credit card or plastic scraper.
    >>
    >> Apply an amount of thermal paste no larger than a grain of rice.
    >> Clean the scraper and use it to spread the paste. The resulting
    >> *translucent* layer should entirely cover the metal heat spreader or
    >> the raised core in older processors. If you can't see through the
    >> layer, it's too thick, and will act more like an insulator than a
    >> conductor of heat. Apply the HSF.

    >
    > The reason I posted this question is because I see conflicting info.
    > Let me see if I can restate my question more clearly:
    >
    > Assuming all the stock thermal pad material (if any) has been removed
    > from the heatsink, which option is best?
    >
    > A. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to the CPU only
    > B. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to the heatsink only
    > C. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to both the CPU and
    > heatsink


    You'll get no conflicting info here: stick with A. Like others have said,
    it's only needed to fill the MICROSCOPIC gaps between the two metal
    surfaces, and too much (IMO) can be worse than none at all.

    --
    I have CDO. It's like Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, only in
    alphabetical order, just like it should be.
     
    Toolman Tim, Jun 23, 2006
    #13
  14. toronado455

    Zitty Guest

    "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:4HWmg.426$...
    > In news:,
    > toronado455 spewed forth:
    >> Al Pilarcik wrote:
    >>> toronado455 wrote:
    >>>> When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied
    >>>> to both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or
    >>>> just the CPU?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> The first step is to remove the existing thermal pad using 99%
    >>> isopropyl alcohol and a credit card or plastic scraper.
    >>>
    >>> Apply an amount of thermal paste no larger than a grain of rice.
    >>> Clean the scraper and use it to spread the paste. The resulting
    >>> *translucent* layer should entirely cover the metal heat spreader or
    >>> the raised core in older processors. If you can't see through the
    >>> layer, it's too thick, and will act more like an insulator than a
    >>> conductor of heat. Apply the HSF.

    >>
    >> The reason I posted this question is because I see conflicting info.
    >> Let me see if I can restate my question more clearly:
    >>
    >> Assuming all the stock thermal pad material (if any) has been removed
    >> from the heatsink, which option is best?
    >>
    >> A. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to the CPU only
    >> B. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to the heatsink only
    >> C. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to both the CPU and
    >> heatsink

    >
    > You'll get no conflicting info here: stick with A. Like others have said,
    > it's only needed to fill the MICROSCOPIC gaps between the two metal
    > surfaces, and too much (IMO) can be worse than none at all.
    >


    Your assuming the heatsink is flat and smooth - most stock heatsinks have
    grooves that look like they've been smoothed with a plough. You need enough
    thermal compound to fill the gaps.

    Personally (in years of practice with electronic stuff as well as PC's), I
    tend to apply a little more than you think you really need (i.e. a little
    more than translucent; about enough to not be able to see though), working
    on the basis that the excess gets squashed out. Just don't overdo the
    excess.
     
    Zitty, Jun 23, 2006
    #14
  15. Zitty wrote:
    > "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    > news:4HWmg.426$...
    >
    >>In news:,
    >>toronado455 spewed forth:
    >>
    >>>Al Pilarcik wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>toronado455 wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied
    >>>>>to both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or
    >>>>>just the CPU?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>The first step is to remove the existing thermal pad using 99%
    >>>>isopropyl alcohol and a credit card or plastic scraper.
    >>>>
    >>>>Apply an amount of thermal paste no larger than a grain of rice.
    >>>>Clean the scraper and use it to spread the paste. The resulting
    >>>>*translucent* layer should entirely cover the metal heat spreader or
    >>>>the raised core in older processors. If you can't see through the
    >>>>layer, it's too thick, and will act more like an insulator than a
    >>>>conductor of heat. Apply the HSF.
    >>>
    >>>The reason I posted this question is because I see conflicting info.
    >>>Let me see if I can restate my question more clearly:
    >>>
    >>>Assuming all the stock thermal pad material (if any) has been removed
    >>>from the heatsink, which option is best?
    >>>
    >>>A. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to the CPU only
    >>>B. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to the heatsink only
    >>>C. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to both the CPU and
    >>>heatsink

    >>
    >>You'll get no conflicting info here: stick with A. Like others have said,
    >>it's only needed to fill the MICROSCOPIC gaps between the two metal
    >>surfaces, and too much (IMO) can be worse than none at all.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Your assuming the heatsink is flat and smooth - most stock heatsinks have
    > grooves that look like they've been smoothed with a plough. You need enough
    > thermal compound to fill the gaps.
    >
    > Personally (in years of practice with electronic stuff as well as PC's), I
    > tend to apply a little more than you think you really need (i.e. a little
    > more than translucent; about enough to not be able to see though), working
    > on the basis that the excess gets squashed out. Just don't overdo the
    > excess.


    A rational approach. But not good enough for The Apache. That makes you
    as big an idiot as me. Complete and total morons. You put a little of
    the shit on a chip and when the clamp comes down, what isn't needed is
    squeezed out. Seems easy enough, but no. Someone has to write a book
    about how compicated it is. Meanwhile, the computers I built years ago
    are running along, quite happily.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Jun 24, 2006
    #15
  16. toronado455

    Zitty Guest

    "Mara" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 21:01:08 -0400, Rôgêr <> wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >>A rational approach. But not good enough for The Apache. That makes you
    >>as big an idiot as me. Complete and total morons. You put a little of
    >>the shit on a chip and when the clamp comes down, what isn't needed is
    >>squeezed out. Seems easy enough, but no. Someone has to write a book
    >>about how compicated it is. Meanwhile, the computers I built years ago
    >>are running along, quite happily.

    >
    > So are mine. Thermal grease isn't rocket science, even if a troll tries to
    > make
    > it out to be. ;)
    >
    > "You mean you haven't banned Banned Apache yet?"
    >


    http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm

    Quote:
    Here is a close up of the top of the CPU core with a fairly thick layer of
    Arctic Silver thermal compound applied. Lapped heatsinks would probably
    require a thinner layer while heatsinks with very rough bases could require
    a slightly thicker layer.
     
    Zitty, Jun 24, 2006
    #16
  17. toronado455

    toronado455 Guest

    Zitty wrote:
    > "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    > news:4HWmg.426$...
    > > In news:,
    > > toronado455 spewed forth:
    > >> Al Pilarcik wrote:
    > >>> toronado455 wrote:
    > >>>> When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied
    > >>>> to both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or
    > >>>> just the CPU?
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>> The first step is to remove the existing thermal pad using 99%
    > >>> isopropyl alcohol and a credit card or plastic scraper.
    > >>>
    > >>> Apply an amount of thermal paste no larger than a grain of rice.
    > >>> Clean the scraper and use it to spread the paste. The resulting
    > >>> *translucent* layer should entirely cover the metal heat spreader or
    > >>> the raised core in older processors. If you can't see through the
    > >>> layer, it's too thick, and will act more like an insulator than a
    > >>> conductor of heat. Apply the HSF.
    > >>
    > >> The reason I posted this question is because I see conflicting info.
    > >> Let me see if I can restate my question more clearly:
    > >>
    > >> Assuming all the stock thermal pad material (if any) has been removed
    > >> from the heatsink, which option is best?
    > >>
    > >> A. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to the CPU only
    > >> B. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to the heatsink only
    > >> C. Apply a translucent layer of thermal compound to both the CPU and
    > >> heatsink

    > >
    > > You'll get no conflicting info here: stick with A. Like others have said,
    > > it's only needed to fill the MICROSCOPIC gaps between the two metal
    > > surfaces, and too much (IMO) can be worse than none at all.
    > >

    >
    > Your assuming the heatsink is flat and smooth - most stock heatsinks have
    > grooves that look like they've been smoothed with a plough.


    That's exactly what the Spire Falconrock II that I just installed looks
    like! Really deep curved grooves from the machining process. Not smooth
    at all.


    >You need enough
    > thermal compound to fill the gaps.


    Which is why I'm so concerned about all this right now. I put way more
    thermal compound on that heatsink than I normally would use - about
    three times as much resulting in a more opaque than translucent layer
    because I was so concerned about filling up those deep grooves. And I
    put a thin translucent layer on the CPU also. As-is the thing runs
    about 3 degrees C hotter than the stock HSF.

    So now I'm wanting to take it back off and lap it. But I've never done
    that before...


    >
    > Personally (in years of practice with electronic stuff as well as PC's), I
    > tend to apply a little more than you think you really need (i.e. a little
    > more than translucent; about enough to not be able to see though), working
    > on the basis that the excess gets squashed out. Just don't overdo the
    > excess.
     
    toronado455, Jun 24, 2006
    #17
  18. toronado455

    Plato Guest

    > What's an HSF? Anyhow, I don't think it'd make any difference how it's

    HeatSinkFan
     
    Plato, Jun 24, 2006
    #18
  19. toronado455

    Plato Guest

    toronado455 wrote:
    >
    > When mounting a HSF on a CPU should the thermal compound be applied to
    > both the surfaces of the CPU *and* the HSF, or just the HSF, or just
    > the CPU?


    If it comes in a retail box with a pad, which is actually just some
    thick thermal compound protected by a plastic tab that has to be removed
    first, then just use that. No need for more.

    Which, if a "pad", you have to be very careful putting the cpu/fansink
    back on as if you take it off for a second and look at it you'll see
    it's actually just a thick paste ie not the type of "pad" that you may
    remember from the Intel/AMD "pentium" days that often came on
    heatsink/fans.

    As far as your question, it doesn't really matter as long as you dont
    use too much thermal compound. When required, I like to put it on the
    cpu then put the heatsink/fan on.





    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Plato, Jun 24, 2006
    #19
  20. Plato wrote:

    >> What's an HSF? Anyhow, I don't think it'd make any difference how it's

    >
    > HeatSinkFan


    *LOL*
    Just imagine thermal paste splattering all around when the fan spins up.
    Do you remember when thermal paste contained beryllium oxide, which is
    *very* healthy, indeed?
    --
    vista policy violation: Microsoft optical mouse detected penguin patterns
    on mousepad. Partition scan in progress to remove offending
    incompatible products. Reactivate MS software.
    Linux 2.6.16-mm1,Xorg7.0 [LinuxCounter#295241,ICQ#4918962]
     
    Walter Mautner, Jun 24, 2006
    #20
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