The wireless barrier.

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by yba02, Nov 26, 2008.

  1. yba02

    yba02 Guest

    Hi,
    It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for it.
    It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    about, or even know why.
    My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC. Not
    supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a key,
    alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not give
    a name.
    One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I brought a
    brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network key
    in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got an IP,
    while mine did not.
    I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system, kicked
    the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I keyed in
    an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor trick, the
    gateway is mad at me.
    Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the brand
    of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on another
    same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?

    Thanks
    Yahya
     
    yba02, Nov 26, 2008
    #1
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  2. yba02

    HASAN Guest

    not sure I understand your problem, but you said "I keyed in an IP ...",
    does it mean you've turned off automatic IP assignment on your laptop?try
    these 2 steps:
    1. check the option "obtain IP automatically" in your network settings
    2.try to force your NIC to request a new IP from DHCP server, use these
    commands
    ipconfig /release
    ipconfig /renew
    if you have vista, you need to run the command prompt in administrator mode,
    right click the command prompt icon and select "run as administrator"
    hope it helps
    HASAN
    "yba02" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for
    > it.
    > It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    > about, or even know why.
    > My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC. Not
    > supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a key,
    > alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not
    > give
    > a name.
    > One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    > residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    > generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I brought
    > a
    > brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network
    > key
    > in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got an
    > IP,
    > while mine did not.
    > I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system, kicked
    > the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I keyed
    > in
    > an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor trick, the
    > gateway is mad at me.
    > Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the brand
    > of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on another
    > same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    > Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Yahya
     
    HASAN, Nov 26, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Hi
    The actual pass phrase is just a tool to generate hex String that is
    actually used for the encryption engine.
    There are subtle variations between systems in the way they generate the
    Hex Strings (especially with WEP).
    Could be that it takes more time to decipher and generate a string between
    your specific hardware and the specific gateway.
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)

    "yba02" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for
    > it.
    > It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    > about, or even know why.
    > My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC. Not
    > supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a key,
    > alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not
    > give
    > a name.
    > One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    > residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    > generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I brought
    > a
    > brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network
    > key
    > in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got an
    > IP,
    > while mine did not.
    > I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system, kicked
    > the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I keyed
    > in
    > an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor trick, the
    > gateway is mad at me.
    > Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the brand
    > of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on another
    > same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    > Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Yahya
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Nov 26, 2008
    #3
  4. yba02

    John Guest

    It's a long story with no useful information.

    The following may be useful:
    Notebook make/model, WiFi card in the notebook, OS version + service pack,
    WiFi router make/model, WiFi security being used (WEP/WPA/WPA2).


    "yba02" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for
    > it.
    > It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    > about, or even know why.
    > My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC. Not
    > supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a key,
    > alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not
    > give
    > a name.
    > One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    > residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    > generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I brought
    > a
    > brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network
    > key
    > in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got an
    > IP,
    > while mine did not.
    > I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system, kicked
    > the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I keyed
    > in
    > an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor trick, the
    > gateway is mad at me.
    > Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the brand
    > of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on another
    > same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    > Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Yahya
     
    John, Nov 26, 2008
    #4
  5. yba02

    John Guest

    Is that a wild guess? or, if you're correct, you must be a psychic.

    I've read it many times and I still don't see WEP or any other WiFi security
    details mentioned anywhere in the post.

    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi
    > The actual pass phrase is just a tool to generate hex String that is
    > actually used for the encryption engine.
    > There are subtle variations between systems in the way they generate the
    > Hex Strings (especially with WEP).
    > Could be that it takes more time to decipher and generate a string between
    > your specific hardware and the specific gateway.
    > Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)
    >
    > "yba02" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi,
    >> It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for
    >> it.
    >> It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    >> about, or even know why.
    >> My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC. Not
    >> supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a key,
    >> alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not
    >> give
    >> a name.
    >> One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    >> residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    >> generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I brought
    >> a
    >> brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network
    >> key
    >> in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got an
    >> IP,
    >> while mine did not.
    >> I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system, kicked
    >> the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I keyed
    >> in
    >> an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor trick, the
    >> gateway is mad at me.
    >> Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the
    >> brand
    >> of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on another
    >> same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    >> Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> Yahya

    >
     
    John, Nov 26, 2008
    #5
  6. yba02

    yba02 Guest

    For those who think they need more information, here is the story, with
    different wording this time.
    I run XP SP2, on a Dell Inspiron 1525, WNIC is Marvell Yukon 88E8040. That
    WNIC supports WEP, WPA and WPA2. The gateway is a Linksys (I do not recall
    the model now.) Currently, the gateway I'm connected to uses WPA2 and it is
    the same protocol used in that Linksys, with which I have the problem. I,
    ALWAYS, use automatic IP assignment.
    The problem I have is: I can connect to a variety of wireless networks, some
    with no security at all and others with WEP, WPA or WPA2. It always works
    for me, except with that particular network.
    I can not figure out any good reason for it, can someone do please?

    Thanks
    Yahya
    "John" wrote:

    > It's a long story with no useful information.
    >
    > The following may be useful:
    > Notebook make/model, WiFi card in the notebook, OS version + service pack,
    > WiFi router make/model, WiFi security being used (WEP/WPA/WPA2).
    >
    >
    > "yba02" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi,
    > > It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for
    > > it.
    > > It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    > > about, or even know why.
    > > My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC. Not
    > > supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a key,
    > > alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not
    > > give
    > > a name.
    > > One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    > > residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    > > generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I brought
    > > a
    > > brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network
    > > key
    > > in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got an
    > > IP,
    > > while mine did not.
    > > I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system, kicked
    > > the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I keyed
    > > in
    > > an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor trick, the
    > > gateway is mad at me.
    > > Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the brand
    > > of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on another
    > > same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    > > Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > > Yahya

    >
    >
    >
     
    yba02, Nov 28, 2008
    #6
  7. yba02

    Marc Guest

    "yba02" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > I run XP SP2, on a Dell Inspiron 1525, WNIC is Marvell Yukon 88E8040.
    > That
    > WNIC supports WEP, WPA and WPA2.


    This is not a wireless adapter. Post the brand and model as well as the
    driver version, of the wireless adapter you are using.


    The gateway is a Linksys (I do not recall
    > the model now.) Currently, the gateway I'm connected to uses WPA2 and
    > it is
    > the same protocol used in that Linksys, with which I have the problem.


    Provide the model number as well as the firmware type if third party and
    firmware version number, of the wireless access point you're having
    trouble connecting too.

    Also, post the key you are trying to use.


    > ALWAYS, use automatic IP assignment.
    > The problem I have is: I can connect to a variety of wireless
    > networks, some
    > with no security at all and others with WEP, WPA or WPA2. It always
    > works
    > for me, except with that particular network.
    > I can not figure out any good reason for it, can someone do please?


    Have a look here:
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555375


    Marc




    >> The following may be useful:
    >> Notebook make/model, WiFi card in the notebook, OS version + service
    >> pack,
    >> WiFi router make/model, WiFi security being used (WEP/WPA/WPA2).
    >>
    >> > Hi,
    >> > It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive
    >> > name for
    >> > it.
    >> > It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not
    >> > much do
    >> > about, or even know why.
    >> > My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC.
    >> > Not
    >> > supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have
    >> > a key,
    >> > alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can
    >> > not
    >> > give
    >> > a name.
    >> > One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    >> > residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so
    >> > regularily
    >> > generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I
    >> > brought
    >> > a
    >> > brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the
    >> > network
    >> > key
    >> > in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop
    >> > got an
    >> > IP,
    >> > while mine did not.
    >> > I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system,
    >> > kicked
    >> > the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I
    >> > keyed
    >> > in
    >> > an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor
    >> > trick, the
    >> > gateway is mad at me.
    >> > Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to
    >> > the brand
    >> > of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on
    >> > another
    >> > same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    >> > Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?
    >> >
    >> > Thanks
    >> > Yahya
     
    Marc, Nov 28, 2008
    #7
  8. Hi
    LOL, you are right :D, in order to help people on line you need to a little
    talent for "pre-cognition" ;).
    Some time when the issues are mercy, I try to provide some kind of info in
    my answers. After years of been online I learned that if One (the helper)
    asks only for more info (like the typical short line "run IPconfig /all and
    post the results), over 95% of the time, the OP does not come back (if they
    knew what IPconfig is, and how to run it they probably would not be here in
    the first place). However, when some kind of related info that might help in
    solving is posted the OP tends to return.
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking).


    "John" <a> wrote in message news:...
    > Is that a wild guess? or, if you're correct, you must be a psychic.
    >
    > I've read it many times and I still don't see WEP or any other WiFi
    > security details mentioned anywhere in the post.
    >
    > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi
    >> The actual pass phrase is just a tool to generate hex String that is
    >> actually used for the encryption engine.
    >> There are subtle variations between systems in the way they generate the
    >> Hex Strings (especially with WEP).
    >> Could be that it takes more time to decipher and generate a string
    >> between your specific hardware and the specific gateway.
    >> Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)
    >>
    >> "yba02" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi,
    >>> It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for
    >>> it.
    >>> It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    >>> about, or even know why.
    >>> My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC. Not
    >>> supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a
    >>> key,
    >>> alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not
    >>> give
    >>> a name.
    >>> One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    >>> residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    >>> generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I
    >>> brought a
    >>> brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network
    >>> key
    >>> in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got
    >>> an IP,
    >>> while mine did not.
    >>> I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system,
    >>> kicked
    >>> the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I
    >>> keyed in
    >>> an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor trick,
    >>> the
    >>> gateway is mad at me.
    >>> Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the
    >>> brand
    >>> of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on
    >>> another
    >>> same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    >>> Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks
    >>> Yahya

    >>

    >
    >
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Nov 28, 2008
    #8
  9. yba02

    Alister Guest

    On Nov 26, 6:07 pm, yba02 <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    > It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for it.
    > It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    > about, or even know why.
    > My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC. Not
    > supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a key,
    > alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not give
    > a name.
    > One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    > residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    > generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I brought a
    > brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network key
    > in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got an IP,
    > while mine did not.
    > I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system, kicked
    > the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I keyed in
    > an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor trick, the
    > gateway is mad at me.
    > Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the brand
    > of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on another
    > same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    > Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Yahya


    It sounds similar to an issue I have come across where the ARP table
    of the gateway has become confused.
    Whenever the gateway issues a DHCP IP it adds the MAC address of the
    client NIC to a table along with the
    assigned IP. It may be that if at some point it re-issued the IP that
    your laptop was using to another client without releasing the arp
    entry in the table. So what is happening now is the gateway recognises
    your MAC address and tries to assign the same IP but then finds an IP
    conflict with another entry in the table, so gives up.

    The solution is to clear the ARP cache on the gateway / router - there
    is normally a way to do this from within the config pages, or failing
    that reboot the gateway.

    HTH

    Alister
     
    Alister, Dec 1, 2008
    #9
  10. yba02

    smlunatick Guest

    On Nov 28, 3:51 am, "Marc" <> wrote:
    > "yba02" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:D...
    >
    > > I run XP SP2, on a Dell Inspiron 1525, WNIC is Marvell Yukon 88E8040.
    > > That
    > > WNIC supports WEP, WPA and WPA2.

    >
    > This is not a wireless adapter. Post the brand and model as well as the
    > driver version, of the wireless adapter you are using.
    >
    >   The gateway is a Linksys (I do not recall
    >
    > > the model now.)  Currently, the gateway I'm connected to uses WPA2 and
    > > it is
    > > the same protocol used in that Linksys, with which I have the problem.

    >
    > Provide the model number as well as the firmware type if third party and
    > firmware version number, of the wireless access point you're having
    > trouble connecting too.
    >
    > Also, post the key you are trying to use.
    >
    > > ALWAYS, use automatic IP assignment.
    > > The problem I have is: I can connect to a variety of wireless
    > > networks, some
    > > with no security at all and others with WEP, WPA or WPA2.  It always
    > > works
    > > for me, except with that particular network.
    > > I can not figure out any good reason for it, can someone do please?

    >
    > Have a look here:http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555375
    >
    > Marc
    >
    > >> The following may be useful:
    > >> Notebook make/model, WiFi card in the notebook, OS version + service
    > >> pack,
    > >> WiFi router make/model, WiFi security being used (WEP/WPA/WPA2).

    >
    > >> > Hi,
    > >> > It is really not a barrier.  In fact, I cant find a descriptive
    > >> > name for
    > >> > it.
    > >> > It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not
    > >> > much do
    > >> > about, or even know  why.
    > >> > My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC.
    > >> > Not
    > >> > supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have
    > >> > a key,
    > >> > alomst.  That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can
    > >> > not
    > >> > give
    > >> > a name.
    > >> > One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    > >> > residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so
    > >> > regularily
    > >> > generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients.  On one occasion, I
    > >> > brought
    > >> > a
    > >> > brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the
    > >> > network
    > >> > key
    > >> > in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop
    > >> > got an
    > >> > IP,
    > >> > while mine did not.
    > >> > I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system,
    > >> > kicked
    > >> > the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain.  Moreover, I
    > >> > keyed
    > >> > in
    > >> > an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway.  Again, poor
    > >> > trick, the
    > >> > gateway is mad at me.
    > >> > Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to
    > >> > the brand
    > >> > of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on
    > >> > another
    > >> > same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    > >> > Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?

    >
    > >> > Thanks
    > >> > Yahya


    Do not post your valid wireless key! This is a small chance that
    someone in your neighbourhood can "hack" your wireless network,
     
    smlunatick, Dec 1, 2008
    #10
  11. yba02

    smlunatick Guest

    On Nov 28, 1:07 am, yba02 <> wrote:
    > For those who think they need more information, here is the story, with
    > different wording this time.
    > I run XP SP2, on a Dell Inspiron 1525, WNIC is Marvell Yukon 88E8040.  That
    > WNIC supports WEP, WPA and WPA2.  The gateway is a Linksys (I do not recall
    > the model now.)  Currently, the gateway I'm connected to uses WPA2 and it is
    > the same protocol used in that Linksys, with which I have the problem. I,
    > ALWAYS, use automatic IP assignment.
    > The problem I have is: I can connect to a variety of wireless networks, some
    > with no security at all and others with WEP, WPA or WPA2.  It always works
    > for me, except with that particular network.
    > I can not figure out any good reason for it, can someone do please?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Yahya
    >
    > "John" wrote:
    > > It's a long story with no useful information.

    >
    > > The following may be useful:
    > > Notebook make/model, WiFi card in the notebook, OS version + service pack,
    > > WiFi router make/model, WiFi security being used (WEP/WPA/WPA2).

    >
    > > "yba02" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...
    > > > Hi,
    > > > It is really not a barrier.  In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for
    > > > it.
    > > > It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    > > > about, or even know  why.
    > > > My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC.  Not
    > > > supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a key,
    > > > alomst.  That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not
    > > > give
    > > > a name.
    > > > One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    > > > residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    > > > generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients.  On one occasion, I brought
    > > > a
    > > > brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network
    > > > key
    > > > in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got an
    > > > IP,
    > > > while mine did not.
    > > > I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system, kicked
    > > > the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain.  Moreover, I keyed
    > > > in
    > > > an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway.  Again, poor trick, the
    > > > gateway is mad at me.
    > > > Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the brand
    > > > of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on another
    > > > same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    > > > Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?

    >
    > > > Thanks
    > > > Yahya


    I encountered this before. Check you anti-virus / Internet security
    software for any possible "blocking" of your problematic network.

    My problem was with my Internet security software (Norton 360) which
    blocked my wireless network SSID.
     
    smlunatick, Dec 1, 2008
    #11
  12. yba02

    big country Guest

    "Alister" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Nov 26, 6:07 pm, yba02 <> wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >> It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for
    >> it.
    >> It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    >> about, or even know why.
    >> My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC. Not
    >> supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a key,
    >> alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not
    >> give
    >> a name.
    >> One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    >> residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    >> generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I brought
    >> a
    >> brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network
    >> key
    >> in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got an
    >> IP,
    >> while mine did not.
    >> I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system, kicked
    >> the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I keyed
    >> in
    >> an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor trick, the
    >> gateway is mad at me.
    >> Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the
    >> brand
    >> of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on another
    >> same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    >> Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> Yahya

    >
    > It sounds similar to an issue I have come across where the ARP table
    > of the gateway has become confused.
    > Whenever the gateway issues a DHCP IP it adds the MAC address of the
    > client NIC to a table along with the
    > assigned IP. It may be that if at some point it re-issued the IP that
    > your laptop was using to another client without releasing the arp
    > entry in the table. So what is happening now is the gateway recognises
    > your MAC address and tries to assign the same IP but then finds an IP
    > conflict with another entry in the table, so gives up.
    >
    > The solution is to clear the ARP cache on the gateway / router - there
    > is normally a way to do this from within the config pages, or failing
    > that reboot the gateway.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > Alister



    I also agree its an ARP table conflict, But Yahya never implied that he ever
    recieved an IP address on that network. So it appears its a MAC address
    conflict, rather than an IP address conflict. It is possible that there are
    other wireless clients connected, or disconnected with their MAC's still in
    the ARP table, with one of those clients using an identical MAC as yours.
    It's rare, but dupicate MAC's do exist among NIC manufacturers.
     
    big country, Dec 3, 2008
    #12
  13. yba02

    Notsosmart Guest

    I have a similar problem. Windows XP pro manages my wifi and constanly claims
    not to be able to obtain an IP address ( little yellow ball goes back and
    forth). The wierd thing is that, in fact, I can connect.
    super7

    "yba02" wrote:

    > Hi,
    > It is really not a barrier. In fact, I cant find a descriptive name for it.
    > It is weird, yet common and kind of that thing that you can not much do
    > about, or even know why.
    > My laptop, like every other laptop out there, has a wireless NIC. Not
    > supprisingly, it connects to every secure network for which I have a key,
    > alomst. That almost is the weird thing that I can describe but can not give
    > a name.
    > One particular network refuses to hand me an IP, even though that
    > residential gateway is configured as a DHCP server and is so regularily
    > generous on giving IPs to IP-thirsty clients. On one occasion, I brought a
    > brand new laptop with mine, started both together, keyed in the network key
    > in both, with mine first. Not supprisingly again, the other laptop got an IP,
    > while mine did not.
    > I shutdown my AV firewall, Windows firewall, restarted the system, kicked
    > the other "lucky laptop" off the network, all in vain. Moreover, I keyed in
    > an IP address in the same subnet of that gateway. Again, poor trick, the
    > gateway is mad at me.
    > Now, I can not imagine that this problem is in anyway related to the brand
    > of my WNIC or that residential gateway. I have tried my laptop on another
    > same brand/same model gateway and it did not suprise me.
    > Has anyone out there possibly stood at a similar cliff before?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Yahya
     
    Notsosmart, Dec 13, 2008
    #13
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