The right Certification

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by Derek, Jan 7, 2007.

  1. Derek

    Derek Guest

    I have been a messing around with computers for about 10 years now and I
    recently found out about microsoft cert. I am not sure which one to go with,
    I know alot about windows xp, software and hardware. I was thinking the MCDST
    certification. What kind of job could I get with this certification. Also my
    computer knowledge didnt come from me going to school for it, it came from
    hands on experience and friends who work in the field. If anyone can help I
    would appreciate it.

    Derek
    Derek, Jan 7, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Wow, 10 years messing around with computers and you just heard of
    Microsoft certifications? Here is a link to help you on your path:
    http://www.microsoft.com/learning. Here you will find the certification
    you want to reach. Some certification take longer to get than others. It
    is a matter of what you want to specialize in. If you want to stick with
    the client side of thing, passing the 70-270 Windows XP Professional
    exam earn you the status of Microsoft Certified Professional. This
    certification (or exam) is normally the foundation for any medium to
    high end Microsoft certification such as Microsoft Certified System
    Administrator (MCSA) or Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE).
    This is based on the information you provided. But suppose you wanted to
    get into application or solution development, then you would look toward
    your MCAD (Application Development) or MCSD (Solutions Development).
    Then you have what you described yourself as doing for 10 years, MCDST
    (Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician). This certification is
    self explanatory; you diagnosis and troubleshoot computers in a Windows
    XP environment.

    Browse the link I provided, tell us what you are wanting to do in the IT
    field, and we can help you narrow down things for you.

    --
    Michael D. Alligood
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    CIW Certified Instructor



    "Derek" <Derek @discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news::

    > I have been a messing around with computers for about 10 years now and I
    > recently found out about microsoft cert. I am not sure which one to go with,
    > I know alot about windows xp, software and hardware. I was thinking the MCDST
    > certification. What kind of job could I get with this certification. Also my
    > computer knowledge didnt come from me going to school for it, it came from
    > hands on experience and friends who work in the field. If anyone can help I
    > would appreciate it.
    >
    > Derek
    Michael D. Alligood, Jan 7, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Derek

    Derek Guest

    I have pretty much narrowed it down to MCDST or one to do with networking. I
    know more about software, hardware and trouble shooting problems in windows
    though, my network skills are limited. My question is, is it going to be hard
    for me to get a job because I never went to college for computers? Like i
    stated earlier all my experience is hands on and self tought. When I first
    started I messed up a few computers but much more practic and time later I
    know what to do. I talked to a tech support person from Dell and he was
    telling me that if i got certified that would sub. for school, is this true??


    "Michael D. Alligood" wrote:

    > Wow, 10 years messing around with computers and you just heard of
    > Microsoft certifications? Here is a link to help you on your path:
    > http://www.microsoft.com/learning. Here you will find the certification
    > you want to reach. Some certification take longer to get than others. It
    > is a matter of what you want to specialize in. If you want to stick with
    > the client side of thing, passing the 70-270 Windows XP Professional
    > exam earn you the status of Microsoft Certified Professional. This
    > certification (or exam) is normally the foundation for any medium to
    > high end Microsoft certification such as Microsoft Certified System
    > Administrator (MCSA) or Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE).
    > This is based on the information you provided. But suppose you wanted to
    > get into application or solution development, then you would look toward
    > your MCAD (Application Development) or MCSD (Solutions Development).
    > Then you have what you described yourself as doing for 10 years, MCDST
    > (Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician). This certification is
    > self explanatory; you diagnosis and troubleshoot computers in a Windows
    > XP environment.
    >
    > Browse the link I provided, tell us what you are wanting to do in the IT
    > field, and we can help you narrow down things for you.
    >
    > --
    > Michael D. Alligood
    > MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    > Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    > CIW Certified Instructor
    >
    >
    >
    > "Derek" <Derek @discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news::
    >
    > > I have been a messing around with computers for about 10 years now and I
    > > recently found out about microsoft cert. I am not sure which one to go with,
    > > I know alot about windows xp, software and hardware. I was thinking the MCDST
    > > certification. What kind of job could I get with this certification. Also my
    > > computer knowledge didnt come from me going to school for it, it came from
    > > hands on experience and friends who work in the field. If anyone can help I
    > > would appreciate it.
    > >
    > > Derek

    >
    >
    Derek, Jan 7, 2007
    #3
  4. I hope getting a certification isn't considered a sub for going to college.
    If thats the case, why did i go to college 4 years? There is no substitute
    for all the different
    courses you go through and computer topics you address in college. You work
    your butt off and learn all kinds of usesless knowledge you'll never use.
    LoL I guess thats true about
    any type of learning you have to go through though. There is lots of stuff
    you don't need to know. It's up to you to get yourself involved in something
    where you can
    apply yourself and your knowledge for "the company" and the betterment
    thereof. I hope to one day get my programming knowledge into practice in my
    job (and hopefully not just
    writing login scripts - LoL)


    "Derek" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have pretty much narrowed it down to MCDST or one to do with networking.
    >I
    > know more about software, hardware and trouble shooting problems in
    > windows
    > though, my network skills are limited. My question is, is it going to be
    > hard
    > for me to get a job because I never went to college for computers? Like i
    > stated earlier all my experience is hands on and self tought. When I first
    > started I messed up a few computers but much more practic and time later I
    > know what to do. I talked to a tech support person from Dell and he was
    > telling me that if i got certified that would sub. for school, is this
    > true??
    >
    >
    > "Michael D. Alligood" wrote:
    >
    >> Wow, 10 years messing around with computers and you just heard of
    >> Microsoft certifications? Here is a link to help you on your path:
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/learning. Here you will find the certification
    >> you want to reach. Some certification take longer to get than others. It
    >> is a matter of what you want to specialize in. If you want to stick with
    >> the client side of thing, passing the 70-270 Windows XP Professional
    >> exam earn you the status of Microsoft Certified Professional. This
    >> certification (or exam) is normally the foundation for any medium to
    >> high end Microsoft certification such as Microsoft Certified System
    >> Administrator (MCSA) or Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE).
    >> This is based on the information you provided. But suppose you wanted to
    >> get into application or solution development, then you would look toward
    >> your MCAD (Application Development) or MCSD (Solutions Development).
    >> Then you have what you described yourself as doing for 10 years, MCDST
    >> (Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician). This certification is
    >> self explanatory; you diagnosis and troubleshoot computers in a Windows
    >> XP environment.
    >>
    >> Browse the link I provided, tell us what you are wanting to do in the IT
    >> field, and we can help you narrow down things for you.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Michael D. Alligood
    >> MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    >> Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    >> CIW Certified Instructor
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Derek" <Derek @discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news::
    >>
    >> > I have been a messing around with computers for about 10 years now and
    >> > I
    >> > recently found out about microsoft cert. I am not sure which one to go
    >> > with,
    >> > I know alot about windows xp, software and hardware. I was thinking the
    >> > MCDST
    >> > certification. What kind of job could I get with this certification.
    >> > Also my
    >> > computer knowledge didnt come from me going to school for it, it came
    >> > from
    >> > hands on experience and friends who work in the field. If anyone can
    >> > help I
    >> > would appreciate it.
    >> >
    >> > Derek

    >>
    >>
    Keith Chilton, Jan 7, 2007
    #4
  5. Ahh, I was wondering when this time old question would service: Degree
    verses Certification; which one is better?!? Nowadays, if you attend any
    soft of college level class, you end up with some sort of certification
    in that field. Example being a majority of degrees are now including
    certification tracks as well. My local community college (Florida
    Community College at Jacksonville) has one of the best IT programs in
    the nation. While their curriculum does not specifically follow the
    exact path prescribed by Microsoft at times; you should have little
    difficulty negotiating the exams after taking the classes.

    I cannot answer your question, but I can share my experiences with you.
    Certifications have given me more of an edge than my college education /
    degree has ever. I could have a degree in underwater basket weaving with
    the certifications I have now and land any IT job I am qualified for.
    Many times when you read the help wanted ads, you will see: "College
    Degree Preferred. Must have your XXXX certification to apply." Sometimes
    I think they want you to have college experience because that normally
    means that you are paying back college loans and you need the money;
    thus you will not leave anytime soon!

    I will say this. I am a fan of learning on any level. I think education
    and knowledge are the keys to success. We cannot honestly tell you what
    would work for you. We can share our experiences and you can put them
    all together and make a decision that you are comfortable with.

    Lets take a look at your certification choices thus far. Here is my
    recommendations based on what you have shared so far:

    A+ -- foundation and recognition for basic PC repair; including Windows
    troubleshooting
    Network+ -- foundation for future networking knowledge
    MCDST -- recognized as a certified desktop support technician in Windows
    XP; included the 70-270 test for a MCP and employers will be
    additionally impressed.
    MCSA / MCITP -- I would start out with the MCSA in Windows 2003, then in
    time upgrade to MCITP: Vista in the Enterprise. Doing so will earn you
    the
    Following: MCSA, MCTS, MCITP: Enterprise.

    Following this program, you will be in the medium status of networking
    while also able to service the client side of things as well. From here
    you can get into the design, messaging, or security side of things in
    the Microsoft field by climbing the certification latter to achieve your
    MCSE.

    I hope all this makes sense to you. If not you can always ask anything
    here or email me directly. Good luck.

    --
    Michael D. Alligood
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    CIW Certified Instructor



    "Derek" <> wrote in message
    news::

    > I have pretty much narrowed it down to MCDST or one to do with networking. I
    > know more about software, hardware and trouble shooting problems in windows
    > though, my network skills are limited. My question is, is it going to be hard
    > for me to get a job because I never went to college for computers? Like i
    > stated earlier all my experience is hands on and self tought. When I first
    > started I messed up a few computers but much more practic and time later I
    > know what to do. I talked to a tech support person from Dell and he was
    > telling me that if i got certified that would sub. for school, is this true??
    >
    >
    > "Michael D. Alligood" wrote:
    >
    > > Wow, 10 years messing around with computers and you just heard of
    > > Microsoft certifications? Here is a link to help you on your path:
    > > http://www.microsoft.com/learning. Here you will find the certification
    > > you want to reach. Some certification take longer to get than others. It
    > > is a matter of what you want to specialize in. If you want to stick with
    > > the client side of thing, passing the 70-270 Windows XP Professional
    > > exam earn you the status of Microsoft Certified Professional. This
    > > certification (or exam) is normally the foundation for any medium to
    > > high end Microsoft certification such as Microsoft Certified System
    > > Administrator (MCSA) or Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE).
    > > This is based on the information you provided. But suppose you wanted to
    > > get into application or solution development, then you would look toward
    > > your MCAD (Application Development) or MCSD (Solutions Development).
    > > Then you have what you described yourself as doing for 10 years, MCDST
    > > (Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician). This certification is
    > > self explanatory; you diagnosis and troubleshoot computers in a Windows
    > > XP environment.
    > >
    > > Browse the link I provided, tell us what you are wanting to do in the IT
    > > field, and we can help you narrow down things for you.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Michael D. Alligood
    > > MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    > > Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    > > CIW Certified Instructor
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Derek" <Derek @discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > news::
    > >
    > > > I have been a messing around with computers for about 10 years now and I
    > > > recently found out about microsoft cert. I am not sure which one to go with,
    > > > I know alot about windows xp, software and hardware. I was thinking the MCDST
    > > > certification. What kind of job could I get with this certification. Also my
    > > > computer knowledge didnt come from me going to school for it, it came from
    > > > hands on experience and friends who work in the field. If anyone can help I
    > > > would appreciate it.
    > > >
    > > > Derek

    > >
    > >
    Michael D. Alligood, Jan 7, 2007
    #5
  6. After I get my MCDST Michael, I am unsure which path to follow. I feel like
    the most beneficial thing (for my company) would be for me to go after the
    MCSA because we have Windows 2000 Servers. However there may be things in
    preparing for the Network+ exam that would benefit them as well by my
    knowing it. However I think Administration of our Active Directory would be
    the best. I am always in such a rush to learn I wish I just already had the
    A+ and Network+ under my belt. Are they hard or easy to achieve? More
    importantly, how quick can one get them? haha




    "Michael D. Alligood" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Ahh, I was wondering when this time old question would service: Degree
    > verses Certification; which one is better?!? Nowadays, if you attend any
    > soft of college level class, you end up with some sort of certification in
    > that field. Example being a majority of degrees are now including
    > certification tracks as well. My local community college (Florida
    > Community College at Jacksonville) has one of the best IT programs in the
    > nation. While their curriculum does not specifically follow the exact path
    > prescribed by Microsoft at times; you should have little difficulty
    > negotiating the exams after taking the classes.
    >
    > I cannot answer your question, but I can share my experiences with you.
    > Certifications have given me more of an edge than my college education /
    > degree has ever. I could have a degree in underwater basket weaving with
    > the certifications I have now and land any IT job I am qualified for. Many
    > times when you read the help wanted ads, you will see: "College Degree
    > Preferred. Must have your XXXX certification to apply." Sometimes I think
    > they want you to have college experience because that normally means that
    > you are paying back college loans and you need the money; thus you will
    > not leave anytime soon!
    >
    > I will say this. I am a fan of learning on any level. I think education
    > and knowledge are the keys to success. We cannot honestly tell you what
    > would work for you. We can share our experiences and you can put them all
    > together and make a decision that you are comfortable with.
    >
    > Lets take a look at your certification choices thus far. Here is my
    > recommendations based on what you have shared so far:
    >
    > A+ -- foundation and recognition for basic PC repair; including Windows
    > troubleshooting
    > Network+ -- foundation for future networking knowledge
    > MCDST -- recognized as a certified desktop support technician in Windows
    > XP; included the 70-270 test for a MCP and employers will be additionally
    > impressed.
    > MCSA / MCITP -- I would start out with the MCSA in Windows 2003, then in
    > time upgrade to MCITP: Vista in the Enterprise. Doing so will earn you the
    > Following: MCSA, MCTS, MCITP: Enterprise.
    >
    > Following this program, you will be in the medium status of networking
    > while also able to service the client side of things as well. From here
    > you can get into the design, messaging, or security side of things in the
    > Microsoft field by climbing the certification latter to achieve your MCSE.
    >
    > I hope all this makes sense to you. If not you can always ask anything
    > here or email me directly. Good luck.
    >
    > --
    > Michael D. Alligood
    > MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    > Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    > CIW Certified Instructor
    >
    >
    >
    > "Derek" <> wrote in message
    > news::
    >
    >> I have pretty much narrowed it down to MCDST or one to do with
    >> networking. I
    >> know more about software, hardware and trouble shooting problems in
    >> windows
    >> though, my network skills are limited. My question is, is it going to be
    >> hard
    >> for me to get a job because I never went to college for computers? Like i
    >> stated earlier all my experience is hands on and self tought. When I
    >> first
    >> started I messed up a few computers but much more practic and time later
    >> I
    >> know what to do. I talked to a tech support person from Dell and he was
    >> telling me that if i got certified that would sub. for school, is this
    >> true??
    >>
    >>
    >> "Michael D. Alligood" wrote:
    >>
    >> > Wow, 10 years messing around with computers and you just heard of
    >> > Microsoft certifications? Here is a link to help you on your path:
    >> > http://www.microsoft.com/learning. Here you will find the certification
    >> > you want to reach. Some certification take longer to get than others.
    >> > It
    >> > is a matter of what you want to specialize in. If you want to stick
    >> > with
    >> > the client side of thing, passing the 70-270 Windows XP Professional
    >> > exam earn you the status of Microsoft Certified Professional. This
    >> > certification (or exam) is normally the foundation for any medium to
    >> > high end Microsoft certification such as Microsoft Certified System
    >> > Administrator (MCSA) or Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE).
    >> > This is based on the information you provided. But suppose you wanted
    >> > to
    >> > get into application or solution development, then you would look
    >> > toward
    >> > your MCAD (Application Development) or MCSD (Solutions Development).
    >> > Then you have what you described yourself as doing for 10 years, MCDST
    >> > (Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician). This certification is
    >> > self explanatory; you diagnosis and troubleshoot computers in a Windows
    >> > XP environment.
    >> >
    >> > Browse the link I provided, tell us what you are wanting to do in the
    >> > IT
    >> > field, and we can help you narrow down things for you.
    >> >
    >> > --
    >> > Michael D. Alligood
    >> > MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    >> > Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    >> > CIW Certified Instructor
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > "Derek" <Derek @discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> > news::
    >> >
    >> > > I have been a messing around with computers for about 10 years now
    >> > > and I
    >> > > recently found out about microsoft cert. I am not sure which one to
    >> > > go with,
    >> > > I know alot about windows xp, software and hardware. I was thinking
    >> > > the MCDST
    >> > > certification. What kind of job could I get with this certification.
    >> > > Also my
    >> > > computer knowledge didnt come from me going to school for it, it
    >> > > came from
    >> > > hands on experience and friends who work in the field. If anyone can
    >> > > help I
    >> > > would appreciate it.
    >> > >
    >> > > Derek
    >> >
    >> >

    >
    Keith Chilton, Jan 8, 2007
    #6
  7. First of all, there is no need to rush. Flowchart your goals. Assigned
    them reasonable completion dates and aim for those dates. Construct your
    flowchart to be fluid. Meaning if you miss your target date, what is the
    backup date? Unless you are under pressure to move into another position
    that requires this certification, there is no need to rush just to get
    certified.

    Here is the link to the CompTIA website; http://www.comptia.org. Here
    you can download the test objectives to all X+ certifications you are
    interested in. Being my first exams, I remember being well prepared. My
    answer to your question if it was easy or hard to achieve would not
    matter. I could scare you and say it was the hardest certification I
    ever earned. Or I could say I took all 3 (A+ has two exams, Network+
    one) in less then an hour. Either way, those answers do not benefit you.
    Nor would my answer to how quick you can achieve them. I probably waited
    2 years to take my A+. Again, being my first real IT exam, I took my
    time and studied.

    First, review the objectives. That is the only way to know what you are
    going to be tested on. Then find your strengths and weaknesses. Here is
    one thing I bet you never thought of. This is true with every test or
    exam I ever took:

    1.) I was always aware of what was I going to be tested on! Read Your
    Test Objectives!
    2.) The answer is always right in front of your face! You just have to
    choose the correct one, but nevertheless it is right there!

    --
    Michael D. Alligood
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    CIW Certified Instructor



    "Keith Chilton" <> wrote in message
    news:#:

    > After I get my MCDST Michael, I am unsure which path to follow. I feel like
    > the most beneficial thing (for my company) would be for me to go after the
    > MCSA because we have Windows 2000 Servers. However there may be things in
    > preparing for the Network+ exam that would benefit them as well by my
    > knowing it. However I think Administration of our Active Directory would be
    > the best. I am always in such a rush to learn I wish I just already had the
    > A+ and Network+ under my belt. Are they hard or easy to achieve? More
    > importantly, how quick can one get them? haha
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Michael D. Alligood" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    > > Ahh, I was wondering when this time old question would service: Degree
    > > verses Certification; which one is better?!? Nowadays, if you attend any
    > > soft of college level class, you end up with some sort of certification in
    > > that field. Example being a majority of degrees are now including
    > > certification tracks as well. My local community college (Florida
    > > Community College at Jacksonville) has one of the best IT programs in the
    > > nation. While their curriculum does not specifically follow the exact path
    > > prescribed by Microsoft at times; you should have little difficulty
    > > negotiating the exams after taking the classes.
    > >
    > > I cannot answer your question, but I can share my experiences with you.
    > > Certifications have given me more of an edge than my college education /
    > > degree has ever. I could have a degree in underwater basket weaving with
    > > the certifications I have now and land any IT job I am qualified for. Many
    > > times when you read the help wanted ads, you will see: "College Degree
    > > Preferred. Must have your XXXX certification to apply." Sometimes I think
    > > they want you to have college experience because that normally means that
    > > you are paying back college loans and you need the money; thus you will
    > > not leave anytime soon!
    > >
    > > I will say this. I am a fan of learning on any level. I think education
    > > and knowledge are the keys to success. We cannot honestly tell you what
    > > would work for you. We can share our experiences and you can put them all
    > > together and make a decision that you are comfortable with.
    > >
    > > Lets take a look at your certification choices thus far. Here is my
    > > recommendations based on what you have shared so far:
    > >
    > > A+ -- foundation and recognition for basic PC repair; including Windows
    > > troubleshooting
    > > Network+ -- foundation for future networking knowledge
    > > MCDST -- recognized as a certified desktop support technician in Windows
    > > XP; included the 70-270 test for a MCP and employers will be additionally
    > > impressed.
    > > MCSA / MCITP -- I would start out with the MCSA in Windows 2003, then in
    > > time upgrade to MCITP: Vista in the Enterprise. Doing so will earn you the
    > > Following: MCSA, MCTS, MCITP: Enterprise.
    > >
    > > Following this program, you will be in the medium status of networking
    > > while also able to service the client side of things as well. From here
    > > you can get into the design, messaging, or security side of things in the
    > > Microsoft field by climbing the certification latter to achieve your MCSE.
    > >
    > > I hope all this makes sense to you. If not you can always ask anything
    > > here or email me directly. Good luck.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Michael D. Alligood
    > > MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    > > Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    > > CIW Certified Instructor
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Derek" <> wrote in message
    > > news::
    > >
    > >> I have pretty much narrowed it down to MCDST or one to do with
    > >> networking. I
    > >> know more about software, hardware and trouble shooting problems in
    > >> windows
    > >> though, my network skills are limited. My question is, is it going to be
    > >> hard
    > >> for me to get a job because I never went to college for computers? Like i
    > >> stated earlier all my experience is hands on and self tought. When I
    > >> first
    > >> started I messed up a few computers but much more practic and time later
    > >> I
    > >> know what to do. I talked to a tech support person from Dell and he was
    > >> telling me that if i got certified that would sub. for school, is this
    > >> true??
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> "Michael D. Alligood" wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > Wow, 10 years messing around with computers and you just heard of
    > >> > Microsoft certifications? Here is a link to help you on your path:
    > >> > http://www.microsoft.com/learning. Here you will find the certification
    > >> > you want to reach. Some certification take longer to get than others.
    > >> > It
    > >> > is a matter of what you want to specialize in. If you want to stick
    > >> > with
    > >> > the client side of thing, passing the 70-270 Windows XP Professional
    > >> > exam earn you the status of Microsoft Certified Professional. This
    > >> > certification (or exam) is normally the foundation for any medium to
    > >> > high end Microsoft certification such as Microsoft Certified System
    > >> > Administrator (MCSA) or Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE).
    > >> > This is based on the information you provided. But suppose you wanted
    > >> > to
    > >> > get into application or solution development, then you would look
    > >> > toward
    > >> > your MCAD (Application Development) or MCSD (Solutions Development).
    > >> > Then you have what you described yourself as doing for 10 years, MCDST
    > >> > (Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician). This certification is
    > >> > self explanatory; you diagnosis and troubleshoot computers in a Windows
    > >> > XP environment.
    > >> >
    > >> > Browse the link I provided, tell us what you are wanting to do in the
    > >> > IT
    > >> > field, and we can help you narrow down things for you.
    > >> >
    > >> > --
    > >> > Michael D. Alligood
    > >> > MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    > >> > Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    > >> > CIW Certified Instructor
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> > "Derek" <Derek @discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > >> > news::
    > >> >
    > >> > > I have been a messing around with computers for about 10 years now
    > >> > > and I
    > >> > > recently found out about microsoft cert. I am not sure which one to
    > >> > > go with,
    > >> > > I know alot about windows xp, software and hardware. I was thinking
    > >> > > the MCDST
    > >> > > certification. What kind of job could I get with this certification.
    > >> > > Also my
    > >> > > computer knowledge didnt come from me going to school for it, it
    > >> > > came from
    > >> > > hands on experience and friends who work in the field. If anyone can
    > >> > > help I
    > >> > > would appreciate it.
    > >> > >
    > >> > > Derek
    > >> >
    > >> >

    > >
    Michael D. Alligood, Jan 8, 2007
    #7
  8. Keith Chilton wrote:
    > After I get my MCDST Michael, I am unsure which path to follow. I feel like
    > the most beneficial thing (for my company) would be for me to go after the
    > MCSA because we have Windows 2000 Servers. However there may be things in
    > preparing for the Network+ exam that would benefit them as well by my
    > knowing it. However I think Administration of our Active Directory would be
    > the best. I am always in such a rush to learn I wish I just already had the
    > A+ and Network+ under my belt. Are they hard or easy to achieve? More
    > importantly, how quick can one get them? haha
    >


    If you are weak in network fundamentals, get Net+ before going after the
    server certs for MCSA. You will need that foundation to move forward to
    a MCSA.
    Jonathan Roberts, Jan 8, 2007
    #8
  9. Derek

    TurkReno Guest

    "Michael D. Alligood" <> wrote in news:
    #:

    > Degree
    > verses Certification; which one is better?!?


    Both if you want to market yourself through HR Screens correctly. You and
    I could go back and forth about that all day.

    --
    Lasher
    MCNGP #50
    www.mcngp.com > all
    MCNGP: Leading the world to better training, better computer skills,
    and taking out the lowdes of the world with fervor beyond anyone's belief.
    TurkReno, Jan 8, 2007
    #9
  10. Yeah, that is a debate that could go either way. But I agree that having
    both opens more doors and allows for greater opportunity.

    --
    Michael D. Alligood
    MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    CIW Certified Instructor



    "TurkReno" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns98B1E96AB203BLasher36526@207.46.248.16:

    > "Michael D. Alligood" <> wrote in news:
    > #:
    >
    > > Degree
    > > verses Certification; which one is better?!?

    >
    > Both if you want to market yourself through HR Screens correctly. You and
    > I could go back and forth about that all day.
    >
    > --
    > Lasher
    > MCNGP #50
    > www.mcngp.com > all
    > MCNGP: Leading the world to better training, better computer skills,
    > and taking out the lowdes of the world with fervor beyond anyone's belief.
    Michael D. Alligood, Jan 8, 2007
    #10
  11. I will review the test objectives from now on! Thanks for your response. I
    think i skimmed them for the 270-72 exam.

    Oh and thanks for all your answers and time you put into typing them. They
    are appreciated!

    --
    Keith Chilton - Data Services Technician / Proof Operator
    River Valley Financial Bank
    430 Clifty Drive
    Madison, IN 47250

    Phone (812) 273-4949 Ext. 348 Fax (812) 265-6730

    ****River Valley Financial Bank, Internet Email Confidentiality Footer****

    Privileged/Confidential Information may be contained in this message. If you
    are not the addressee indicated in this message (or responsible for delivery
    of the message to such person), you may not copy or deliver this message to
    anyone. In such case, you should destroy this message, and notify us
    immediately. If you or your employer does not consent to Internet email
    messages of this kind, please advise us immediately. Any opinions or advice
    contained in this email are subject to the terms and conditions in any
    applicable client engagement letter or agreement.

    "Michael D. Alligood" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > First of all, there is no need to rush. Flowchart your goals. Assigned
    > them reasonable completion dates and aim for those dates. Construct your
    > flowchart to be fluid. Meaning if you miss your target date, what is the
    > backup date? Unless you are under pressure to move into another position
    > that requires this certification, there is no need to rush just to get
    > certified.
    >
    > Here is the link to the CompTIA website; http://www.comptia.org. Here you
    > can download the test objectives to all X+ certifications you are
    > interested in. Being my first exams, I remember being well prepared. My
    > answer to your question if it was easy or hard to achieve would not
    > matter. I could scare you and say it was the hardest certification I ever
    > earned. Or I could say I took all 3 (A+ has two exams, Network+ one) in
    > less then an hour. Either way, those answers do not benefit you. Nor would
    > my answer to how quick you can achieve them. I probably waited 2 years to
    > take my A+. Again, being my first real IT exam, I took my time and
    > studied.
    >
    > First, review the objectives. That is the only way to know what you are
    > going to be tested on. Then find your strengths and weaknesses. Here is
    > one thing I bet you never thought of. This is true with every test or exam
    > I ever took:
    >
    > 1.) I was always aware of what was I going to be tested on! Read Your Test
    > Objectives!
    > 2.) The answer is always right in front of your face! You just have to
    > choose the correct one, but nevertheless it is right there!
    >
    > --
    > Michael D. Alligood
    > MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    > Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    > CIW Certified Instructor
    >
    >
    >
    > "Keith Chilton" <> wrote in message
    > news:#:
    >
    >> After I get my MCDST Michael, I am unsure which path to follow. I feel
    >> like
    >> the most beneficial thing (for my company) would be for me to go after
    >> the
    >> MCSA because we have Windows 2000 Servers. However there may be things in
    >> preparing for the Network+ exam that would benefit them as well by my
    >> knowing it. However I think Administration of our Active Directory would
    >> be
    >> the best. I am always in such a rush to learn I wish I just already had
    >> the
    >> A+ and Network+ under my belt. Are they hard or easy to achieve? More
    >> importantly, how quick can one get them? haha
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Michael D. Alligood" <> wrote in message
    >> news:%...
    >> > Ahh, I was wondering when this time old question would service: Degree
    >> > verses Certification; which one is better?!? Nowadays, if you attend
    >> > any
    >> > soft of college level class, you end up with some sort of certification
    >> > in
    >> > that field. Example being a majority of degrees are now including
    >> > certification tracks as well. My local community college (Florida
    >> > Community College at Jacksonville) has one of the best IT programs in
    >> > the
    >> > nation. While their curriculum does not specifically follow the exact
    >> > path
    >> > prescribed by Microsoft at times; you should have little difficulty
    >> > negotiating the exams after taking the classes.
    >> >
    >> > I cannot answer your question, but I can share my experiences with you.
    >> > Certifications have given me more of an edge than my college education
    >> > /
    >> > degree has ever. I could have a degree in underwater basket weaving
    >> > with
    >> > the certifications I have now and land any IT job I am qualified for.
    >> > Many
    >> > times when you read the help wanted ads, you will see: "College Degree
    >> > Preferred. Must have your XXXX certification to apply." Sometimes I
    >> > think
    >> > they want you to have college experience because that normally means
    >> > that
    >> > you are paying back college loans and you need the money; thus you will
    >> > not leave anytime soon!
    >> >
    >> > I will say this. I am a fan of learning on any level. I think education
    >> > and knowledge are the keys to success. We cannot honestly tell you what
    >> > would work for you. We can share our experiences and you can put them
    >> > all
    >> > together and make a decision that you are comfortable with.
    >> >
    >> > Lets take a look at your certification choices thus far. Here is my
    >> > recommendations based on what you have shared so far:
    >> >
    >> > A+ -- foundation and recognition for basic PC repair; including Windows
    >> > troubleshooting
    >> > Network+ -- foundation for future networking knowledge
    >> > MCDST -- recognized as a certified desktop support technician in
    >> > Windows
    >> > XP; included the 70-270 test for a MCP and employers will be
    >> > additionally
    >> > impressed.
    >> > MCSA / MCITP -- I would start out with the MCSA in Windows 2003, then
    >> > in
    >> > time upgrade to MCITP: Vista in the Enterprise. Doing so will earn you
    >> > the
    >> > Following: MCSA, MCTS, MCITP: Enterprise.
    >> >
    >> > Following this program, you will be in the medium status of networking
    >> > while also able to service the client side of things as well. From here
    >> > you can get into the design, messaging, or security side of things in
    >> > the
    >> > Microsoft field by climbing the certification latter to achieve your
    >> > MCSE.
    >> >
    >> > I hope all this makes sense to you. If not you can always ask anything
    >> > here or email me directly. Good luck.
    >> >
    >> > --
    >> > Michael D. Alligood
    >> > MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    >> > Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    >> > CIW Certified Instructor
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > "Derek" <> wrote in message
    >> > news::
    >> >
    >> >> I have pretty much narrowed it down to MCDST or one to do with
    >> >> networking. I
    >> >> know more about software, hardware and trouble shooting problems in
    >> >> windows
    >> >> though, my network skills are limited. My question is, is it going to
    >> >> be
    >> >> hard
    >> >> for me to get a job because I never went to college for computers?
    >> >> Like i
    >> >> stated earlier all my experience is hands on and self tought. When I
    >> >> first
    >> >> started I messed up a few computers but much more practic and time
    >> >> later
    >> >> I
    >> >> know what to do. I talked to a tech support person from Dell and he
    >> >> was
    >> >> telling me that if i got certified that would sub. for school, is this
    >> >> true??
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> "Michael D. Alligood" wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> > Wow, 10 years messing around with computers and you just heard of
    >> >> > Microsoft certifications? Here is a link to help you on your path:
    >> >> > http://www.microsoft.com/learning. Here you will find the
    >> >> > certification
    >> >> > you want to reach. Some certification take longer to get than
    >> >> > others.
    >> >> > It
    >> >> > is a matter of what you want to specialize in. If you want to stick
    >> >> > with
    >> >> > the client side of thing, passing the 70-270 Windows XP Professional
    >> >> > exam earn you the status of Microsoft Certified Professional. This
    >> >> > certification (or exam) is normally the foundation for any medium to
    >> >> > high end Microsoft certification such as Microsoft Certified System
    >> >> > Administrator (MCSA) or Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE).
    >> >> > This is based on the information you provided. But suppose you
    >> >> > wanted
    >> >> > to
    >> >> > get into application or solution development, then you would look
    >> >> > toward
    >> >> > your MCAD (Application Development) or MCSD (Solutions Development).
    >> >> > Then you have what you described yourself as doing for 10 years,
    >> >> > MCDST
    >> >> > (Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician). This certification
    >> >> > is
    >> >> > self explanatory; you diagnosis and troubleshoot computers in a
    >> >> > Windows
    >> >> > XP environment.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Browse the link I provided, tell us what you are wanting to do in
    >> >> > the
    >> >> > IT
    >> >> > field, and we can help you narrow down things for you.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > --
    >> >> > Michael D. Alligood
    >> >> > MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+,
    >> >> > Network+, i-Net+, CIW Assoc.,
    >> >> > CIW Certified Instructor
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >> > "Derek" <Derek @discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> >> > news::
    >> >> >
    >> >> > > I have been a messing around with computers for about 10 years
    >> >> > > now
    >> >> > > and I
    >> >> > > recently found out about microsoft cert. I am not sure which one
    >> >> > > to
    >> >> > > go with,
    >> >> > > I know alot about windows xp, software and hardware. I was
    >> >> > > thinking
    >> >> > > the MCDST
    >> >> > > certification. What kind of job could I get with this
    >> >> > > certification.
    >> >> > > Also my
    >> >> > > computer knowledge didnt come from me going to school for it, it
    >> >> > > came from
    >> >> > > hands on experience and friends who work in the field. If anyone
    >> >> > > can
    >> >> > > help I
    >> >> > > would appreciate it.
    >> >> > >
    >> >> > > Derek
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >

    >
    Keith Chilton, Jan 8, 2007
    #11
  12. That's a good idea and also because there is only one test for the Net+ I
    think it's a great idea! Thanks Jonathan! I am sure I would learn quite a
    bit studying for that exam that would help me diagnose network problems
    better. I took Computer Networking at Purdue and I got a C in it I think.
    But it was a really hard C. My final exam was 18 pages essay format!

    --
    Keith Chilton - Data Services Technician / Proof Operator
    River Valley Financial Bank
    430 Clifty Drive
    Madison, IN 47250

    Phone (812) 273-4949 Ext. 348 Fax (812) 265-6730

    ****River Valley Financial Bank, Internet Email Confidentiality Footer****

    Privileged/Confidential Information may be contained in this message. If you
    are not the addressee indicated in this message (or responsible for delivery
    of the message to such person), you may not copy or deliver this message to
    anyone. In such case, you should destroy this message, and notify us
    immediately. If you or your employer does not consent to Internet email
    messages of this kind, please advise us immediately. Any opinions or advice
    contained in this email are subject to the terms and conditions in any
    applicable client engagement letter or agreement.

    "Jonathan Roberts" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Keith Chilton wrote:
    >> After I get my MCDST Michael, I am unsure which path to follow. I feel
    >> like the most beneficial thing (for my company) would be for me to go
    >> after the MCSA because we have Windows 2000 Servers. However there may be
    >> things in preparing for the Network+ exam that would benefit them as well
    >> by my knowing it. However I think Administration of our Active Directory
    >> would be the best. I am always in such a rush to learn I wish I just
    >> already had the A+ and Network+ under my belt. Are they hard or easy to
    >> achieve? More importantly, how quick can one get them? haha
    >>

    >
    > If you are weak in network fundamentals, get Net+ before going after the
    > server certs for MCSA. You will need that foundation to move forward to a
    > MCSA.
    Keith Chilton, Jan 8, 2007
    #12
    1. Advertising

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