"The Nuclear Boy Scout" on DVD (UK)

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Fred Goodwin, CMA, Jul 25, 2006.

  1. FYI:

    I just got my copy; it will play on my PC, but not in the DVD player
    attached to my TV (I'm in the US).
    Fred Goodwin, CMA, Jul 25, 2006
    #1
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  2. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    Guest

    In sci.physics Fred Goodwin, CMA <> wrote:
    > FYI:


    > I just got my copy; it will play on my PC, but not in the DVD player
    > attached to my TV (I'm in the US).


    You get a European DVD and it won't play on your US DVD player.

    1) Why are you surprised by this?
    2) Why are you posting this to sci.physics?

    --
    Jim Pennino

    Remove .spam.sux to reply.
    , Jul 25, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. wrote:
    >
    > You get a European DVD and it won't play on your US DVD player.
    >
    > 1) Why are you surprised by this?


    I didn't assume anything, if that's what you're getting at. I asked
    the vendor ahead of time if it would play in a US DVD player and they
    said yes.

    On the off-chance that anyone else reading this decides to buy a copy
    and is told the same thing, I thought it would be a public service to
    post otherwise.

    > 2) Why are you posting this to sci.physics?


    I thought the story of how an average kid, working on his Atomic Energy
    merit badge for Boy Scouts, could take everyday materials and build
    himself a working nuclear reactor might be of interest to some of those
    in sci.physics. For those who are interested, see:

    "The Radioactive Boy Scout"

    http://www.dangerouslaboratories.org/radscout.html

    Those who are not interested are free to skip it.
    Fred Goodwin, CMA, Jul 25, 2006
    #3
  4. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    Guest

    In article <>, "Fred Goodwin, CMA" <> writes:
    > wrote:
    >>
    >> You get a European DVD and it won't play on your US DVD player.
    >>
    >> 1) Why are you surprised by this?

    >
    >I didn't assume anything, if that's what you're getting at. I asked
    >the vendor ahead of time if it would play in a US DVD player and they
    >said yes.
    >
    >On the off-chance that anyone else reading this decides to buy a copy
    >and is told the same thing, I thought it would be a public service to
    >post otherwise.
    >
    >> 2) Why are you posting this to sci.physics?

    >
    >I thought the story of how an average kid, working on his Atomic Energy
    >merit badge for Boy Scouts, could take everyday materials and build
    >himself a working nuclear reactor might be of interest to some of those
    >in sci.physics. For those who are interested, see:
    >
    >"The Radioactive Boy Scout"
    >
    >http://www.dangerouslaboratories.org/radscout.html
    >
    >Those who are not interested are free to skip it.


    Old and stale story. Calling this a reactor is akin to calling a
    hobbyist's rocket "a balistic missile".

    Mati Meron | "When you argue with a fool,
    | chances are he is doing just the same"
    , Jul 25, 2006
    #4
  5. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    Edward Green Guest

    wrote:
    > In article <>, "Fred Goodwin, CMA" <> writes:
    > > wrote:
    > >>
    > >> You get a European DVD and it won't play on your US DVD player.
    > >>
    > >> 1) Why are you surprised by this?

    > >
    > >I didn't assume anything, if that's what you're getting at. I asked
    > >the vendor ahead of time if it would play in a US DVD player and they
    > >said yes.
    > >
    > >On the off-chance that anyone else reading this decides to buy a copy
    > >and is told the same thing, I thought it would be a public service to
    > >post otherwise.
    > >
    > >> 2) Why are you posting this to sci.physics?

    > >
    > >I thought the story of how an average kid, working on his Atomic Energy
    > >merit badge for Boy Scouts, could take everyday materials and build
    > >himself a working nuclear reactor might be of interest to some of those
    > >in sci.physics. For those who are interested, see:
    > >
    > >"The Radioactive Boy Scout"
    > >
    > >http://www.dangerouslaboratories.org/radscout.html
    > >
    > >Those who are not interested are free to skip it.

    >
    > Old and stale story. Calling this a reactor is akin to calling a
    > hobbyist's rocket "a balistic missile".


    A missile is something which flies through the air.

    "Ballistic" is what happens after the fuel runs out.

    Ergo, any hobbyist can build and fly a ballistic missile. ;-)

    I've thought it interesting, from time to time, when I'm really,
    really, bored, how "missile", which originally said nothing about the
    means of propulsion, has become synonymous in the popular mind with
    "medium sized rocket".

    Is this the same kid who, supposedly, wrote up a design for a nuclear
    bomb accurate enough that he received a visit from the feds, who could
    neither confirm nor deny how close he had come, but presumably hadn't
    stopped by merely to say "nice try".
    Edward Green, Jul 26, 2006
    #5
  6. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    Guest

    In article <>, "Edward Green" <> writes:
    >
    > wrote:
    >> In article <>, "Fred Goodwin, CMA" <> writes:
    >> > wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> You get a European DVD and it won't play on your US DVD player.
    >> >>
    >> >> 1) Why are you surprised by this?
    >> >
    >> >I didn't assume anything, if that's what you're getting at. I asked
    >> >the vendor ahead of time if it would play in a US DVD player and they
    >> >said yes.
    >> >
    >> >On the off-chance that anyone else reading this decides to buy a copy
    >> >and is told the same thing, I thought it would be a public service to
    >> >post otherwise.
    >> >
    >> >> 2) Why are you posting this to sci.physics?
    >> >
    >> >I thought the story of how an average kid, working on his Atomic Energy
    >> >merit badge for Boy Scouts, could take everyday materials and build
    >> >himself a working nuclear reactor might be of interest to some of those
    >> >in sci.physics. For those who are interested, see:
    >> >
    >> >"The Radioactive Boy Scout"
    >> >
    >> >http://www.dangerouslaboratories.org/radscout.html
    >> >
    >> >Those who are not interested are free to skip it.

    >>
    >> Old and stale story. Calling this a reactor is akin to calling a
    >> hobbyist's rocket "a balistic missile".

    >
    >A missile is something which flies through the air.
    >
    >"Ballistic" is what happens after the fuel runs out.
    >
    >Ergo, any hobbyist can build and fly a ballistic missile. ;-)
    >
    >I've thought it interesting, from time to time, when I'm really,
    >really, bored, how "missile", which originally said nothing about the
    >means of propulsion, has become synonymous in the popular mind with
    >"medium sized rocket".
    >

    Well, medium and up, to be exact. But your point is well taken, in
    the original meaning missile could just as well be a javelin or a
    thrown rock.

    >Is this the same kid who, supposedly, wrote up a design for a nuclear
    >bomb accurate enough that he received a visit from the feds, who could
    >neither confirm nor deny how close he had come, but presumably hadn't
    >stopped by merely to say "nice try".
    >

    I think it is a different kid.

    Mati Meron | "When you argue with a fool,
    | chances are he is doing just the same"
    , Jul 26, 2006
    #6
  7. wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > "Edward Green" <> writes:
    > >
    > >Is this the same kid who, supposedly, wrote up a design for a
    > >nuclear bomb accurate enough that he received a visit from the
    > >feds, who could neither confirm nor deny how close he had come,
    > >but presumably hadn't stopped by merely to say "nice try".
    > >

    > I think it is a different kid.


    The government did in fact come out and clean-up this kid's "reactor";
    there's a photo of the clean-up at the URL below:

    http://www.dangerouslaboratories.org/radscout.html
    Fred Goodwin, CMA, Jul 26, 2006
    #7
  8. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    RichA Guest

    Fred Goodwin, CMA wrote:
    > wrote:
    > >
    > > You get a European DVD and it won't play on your US DVD player.
    > >
    > > 1) Why are you surprised by this?

    >
    > I didn't assume anything, if that's what you're getting at. I asked
    > the vendor ahead of time if it would play in a US DVD player and they
    > said yes.
    >
    > On the off-chance that anyone else reading this decides to buy a copy
    > and is told the same thing, I thought it would be a public service to
    > post otherwise.
    >
    > > 2) Why are you posting this to sci.physics?

    >
    > I thought the story of how an average kid, working on his Atomic Energy
    > merit badge for Boy Scouts, could take everyday materials and build
    > himself a working nuclear reactor might be of interest to some of those
    > in sci.physics. For those who are interested, see:
    >
    > "The Radioactive Boy Scout"
    >
    > http://www.dangerouslaboratories.org/radscout.html
    >
    > Those who are not interested are free to skip it.


    It was a fascinating story and it highlighted a graphic problem that is
    stifling creativity
    in the U.S. today; The pathological fear of risk, when it comes to
    anything. Ads urge mommies to carry frigging gelled alcohol to
    constantly wipe their kids hands, chemistry sets contain nothing
    remotely interesting anymore because of "safety concerns."
    They are turning adults and children into a nation of SISSIES afraid to
    take any kind
    risk that would assist them in learning or just developing as a human
    and not a robot.
    RichA, Jul 27, 2006
    #8
  9. In article <>,
    RichA <> wrote:

    > It was a fascinating story and it highlighted a graphic problem that is
    > stifling creativity
    > in the U.S. today; The pathological fear of risk, when it comes to
    > anything. Ads urge mommies to carry frigging gelled alcohol to
    > constantly wipe their kids hands, chemistry sets contain nothing
    > remotely interesting anymore because of "safety concerns."
    > They are turning adults and children into a nation of SISSIES afraid to
    > take any kind
    > risk that would assist them in learning or just developing as a human
    > and not a robot.


    Its not just a US problem. In the UK the same holds. I remember (in the
    70's) having chemistry sets with magnesium, and crystal growing kits.

    --
    Relf's Law? -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    "Bullshit repeated to the limit of infinity asymptotically approaches
    the odour of roses."
    Corollary -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    ³It approaches the asymptote faster, the more Œpseduos¹ you throw in
    your formulas.²

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
    Phineas T Puddleduck, Jul 27, 2006
    #9
  10. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    T Wake Guest

    "Phineas T Puddleduck" <_NOSPAM> wrote in
    message news:270720060012457958%_NOSPAM...
    > In article <>,
    > RichA <> wrote:
    >
    >> It was a fascinating story and it highlighted a graphic problem that is
    >> stifling creativity
    >> in the U.S. today; The pathological fear of risk, when it comes to
    >> anything. Ads urge mommies to carry frigging gelled alcohol to
    >> constantly wipe their kids hands, chemistry sets contain nothing
    >> remotely interesting anymore because of "safety concerns."
    >> They are turning adults and children into a nation of SISSIES afraid to
    >> take any kind
    >> risk that would assist them in learning or just developing as a human
    >> and not a robot.

    >
    > Its not just a US problem. In the UK the same holds. I remember (in the
    > 70's) having chemistry sets with magnesium, and crystal growing kits.
    >



    The good old days of actually having toxic chemicals in the house! I think I
    still have some old chemistry kits in the loft..... I may dig them out one
    day - when I have enough protective equipment to hand.....
    T Wake, Jul 27, 2006
    #10
  11. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    Guest

    In article <270720060012457958%_NOSPAM>, Phineas T Puddleduck <_NOSPAM> writes:
    >In article <>,
    >RichA <> wrote:
    >
    >> It was a fascinating story and it highlighted a graphic problem that is
    >> stifling creativity
    >> in the U.S. today; The pathological fear of risk, when it comes to
    >> anything. Ads urge mommies to carry frigging gelled alcohol to
    >> constantly wipe their kids hands, chemistry sets contain nothing
    >> remotely interesting anymore because of "safety concerns."
    >> They are turning adults and children into a nation of SISSIES afraid to
    >> take any kind
    >> risk that would assist them in learning or just developing as a human
    >> and not a robot.

    >
    >Its not just a US problem. In the UK the same holds. I remember (in the
    >70's) having chemistry sets with magnesium, and crystal growing kits.
    >

    This appears to be a general problem of the western civilization.
    Safety became the new religion and it is pursued with the kind of zeal
    typical of new religions.

    Mati Meron | "When you argue with a fool,
    | chances are he is doing just the same"
    , Jul 27, 2006
    #11
  12. In article <>, T Wake
    <> wrote:

    > > Its not just a US problem. In the UK the same holds. I remember (in the
    > > 70's) having chemistry sets with magnesium, and crystal growing kits.
    > >

    >
    >
    > The good old days of actually having toxic chemicals in the house! I think I
    > still have some old chemistry kits in the loft..... I may dig them out one
    > day - when I have enough protective equipment to hand.....


    Some fun times with thermite when I was a kid. And potassium
    permanganate....

    --
    Relf's Law? -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    "Bullshit repeated to the limit of infinity asymptotically approaches
    the odour of roses."
    Corollary -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    ³It approaches the asymptote faster, the more Œpseduos¹ you throw in
    your formulas.²

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
    Phineas T Puddleduck, Jul 27, 2006
    #12
  13. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    Default User Guest

    Phineas T Puddleduck wrote:


    > Its not just a US problem. In the UK the same holds. I remember (in
    > the 70's) having chemistry sets with magnesium, and crystal growing
    > kits.


    The one I had stocked sulphur, and I could buy saltpeter at the drug
    store.

    I think you can see where this is going.




    Brian
    --
    If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
    won't shut up.
    -- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
    Default User, Jul 27, 2006
    #13
  14. In article <>, Default User
    <> wrote:

    > Phineas T Puddleduck wrote:
    >
    >
    > > Its not just a US problem. In the UK the same holds. I remember (in
    > > the 70's) having chemistry sets with magnesium, and crystal growing
    > > kits.

    >
    > The one I had stocked sulphur, and I could buy saltpeter at the drug
    > store.
    >
    > I think you can see where this is going.
    >
    >

    You could do what we did, and just bought fireworks...

    The local toy store by me used to sell balsa kits for making gliders.
    Of course, if you replaced the BODY of the glider with a rocket....

    ;-)

    --
    Relf's Law? -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    "Bullshit repeated to the limit of infinity asymptotically approaches
    the odour of roses."
    Corollary -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    ³It approaches the asymptote faster, the more Œpseduos¹ you throw in
    your formulas.²

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
    Phineas T Puddleduck, Jul 27, 2006
    #14
  15. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    WinField Guest

    Phineas T Puddleduck wrote:

    > You could do what we did, and just bought fireworks...
    >
    > The local toy store by me used to sell balsa kits for making gliders.
    > Of course, if you replaced the BODY of the glider with a rocket....
    >
    > ;-)


    Doesn't sound like you actually tested what you allude to above.

    As a kid, my friend and I strapped an Estes rocket engine to a
    balsa-wood glider, thinking it would really soar.

    What we got instead was a rather large "ball" of tiny balsa-wood chips
    raining gently down in front of us. We never did see the glider get
    shredded ... just phhttt, and a shower of fluttering chips.

    Science does surprise. Even kids.

    - winfield
    WinField, Jul 27, 2006
    #15
  16. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    beav Guest

    On Wed, 26 Jul 2006 20:13:03 -0700, WinField <>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >Phineas T Puddleduck wrote:
    >
    >> You could do what we did, and just bought fireworks...
    >>
    >> The local toy store by me used to sell balsa kits for making gliders.
    >> Of course, if you replaced the BODY of the glider with a rocket....
    >>
    >> ;-)

    >
    >Doesn't sound like you actually tested what you allude to above.
    >
    >As a kid, my friend and I strapped an Estes rocket engine to a
    >balsa-wood glider, thinking it would really soar.
    >
    >What we got instead was a rather large "ball" of tiny balsa-wood chips
    >raining gently down in front of us. We never did see the glider get
    >shredded ... just phhttt, and a shower of fluttering chips.
    >
    >Science does surprise. Even kids.
    >
    > - winfield



    heh heh heh. we put a balsa nosecap on an engine, strapped a stick to
    the side of it (it looked like the War of 1812 congreve rocket) and
    lit it. it flew amazingly poorly. we didn't expect it to boomerang
    back at us.

    what DO kids do today? my nephew is a junior in HS, likes Chemistry a
    lot (got an 800 on his chem SAT II) ! AND DOESN'T HAVE A CHEMISTRY
    SET! next time he's over, i'll have to blow the dust off my, <ahem>
    "boom box" AND TAUNT HIM.

    probably got that 800 because he knew his lab safety procedures....
    beav, Jul 27, 2006
    #16
  17. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    Guest

    In sci.physics WinField <> wrote:


    > Doesn't sound like you actually tested what you allude to above.


    > As a kid, my friend and I strapped an Estes rocket engine to a
    > balsa-wood glider, thinking it would really soar.


    > What we got instead was a rather large "ball" of tiny balsa-wood chips
    > raining gently down in front of us. We never did see the glider get
    > shredded ... just phhttt, and a shower of fluttering chips.


    > Science does surprise. Even kids.


    > - winfield


    Should have used Jet-X engines; lower peak thrust and longer burn time.

    What we learned was if you didn't put foil over the balsa where the
    exhaust hit it, you got a really neat in-flight fire.

    --
    Jim Pennino

    Remove .spam.sux to reply.
    , Jul 27, 2006
    #17
  18. WinField wrote:
    >
    >
    > Phineas T Puddleduck wrote:
    >
    >> You could do what we did, and just bought fireworks...
    >>
    >> The local toy store by me used to sell balsa kits for making gliders.
    >> Of course, if you replaced the BODY of the glider with a rocket....
    >>
    >> ;-)

    >
    > Doesn't sound like you actually tested what you allude to above.
    >
    > As a kid, my friend and I strapped an Estes rocket engine to a
    > balsa-wood glider, thinking it would really soar.
    >
    > What we got instead was a rather large "ball" of tiny balsa-wood chips
    > raining gently down in front of us. We never did see the glider get
    > shredded ... just phhttt, and a shower of fluttering chips.
    >
    > Science does surprise. Even kids.
    >
    > - winfield


    That would have been the Mark I, which taught you about materials
    strength, right? So what was the Mark II built with? ;-)

    Jim
    J.F. Cornwall, Jul 27, 2006
    #18
  19. Fred Goodwin, CMA

    Edwards Guest

    On 2006-07-26, <> wrote:
    > In article <270720060012457958%_NOSPAM>, Phineas T Puddleduck <_NOSPAM> writes:
    >>In article <>,
    >>RichA <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> It was a fascinating story and it highlighted a graphic problem that is
    >>> stifling creativity
    >>> in the U.S. today; The pathological fear of risk, when it comes to
    >>> anything. Ads urge mommies to carry frigging gelled alcohol to

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    >>> constantly wipe their kids hands, chemistry sets contain nothing

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    >>> remotely interesting anymore because of "safety concerns."
    >>> They are turning adults and children into a nation of SISSIES afraid to
    >>> take any kind
    >>> risk that would assist them in learning or just developing as a human
    >>> and not a robot.

    >>
    >>Its not just a US problem. In the UK the same holds. I remember (in the
    >>70's) having chemistry sets with magnesium, and crystal growing kits.
    >>

    > This appears to be a general problem of the western civilization.
    > Safety became the new religion and it is pursued with the kind of zeal
    > typical of new religions.


    But it's not even "real" safety, just a (often badly misguided)
    _sense_ of safety. I mean, "Kills 99.99% of bacteria." Great, so
    tomorrow you'll have the same amount of bacteria on your kitchen
    counter (it'll reproduce as much as the environment will allow,
    right?), and it will _all_ be descended from that .01% that was too
    nasty to be killed by your little wipe.

    --
    Darrin
    Edwards, Jul 27, 2006
    #19
  20. In article <>, beav
    <> wrote:

    > >> The local toy store by me used to sell balsa kits for making gliders.
    > >> Of course, if you replaced the BODY of the glider with a rocket....
    > >>
    > >> ;-)

    > >
    > >Doesn't sound like you actually tested what you allude to above.


    Actually I did. We never found the remains. Of course, success or
    failure was merely judged on the devastation....

    --
    Relf's Law? -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    "Bullshit repeated to the limit of infinity asymptotically approaches
    the odour of roses."
    Corollary -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    ³It approaches the asymptote faster, the more Œpseduos¹ you throw in
    your formulas.²

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
    Phineas T Puddleduck, Jul 27, 2006
    #20
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