the no cost 'DIY only' approach - converting slides and neg's todigital ...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by dave, Oct 15, 2005.

  1. dave

    dave Guest

    have the following problem, but no funds:
    quickly and at no cost converting hundreds of 35mm neg's (cut to '5 negs
    per strip') and also 35mm slides (similar quantities), to digital
    images, hopefully at ZERO cost

    have the following equipment, and skills:
    good digital camera, with 'base to tripod/mount' ability, a good tripod,
    a 'working good' slide projector, a film and slide scanner (LS-1000
    nikon, but it's *painfully* slow, and the software is 'dicey at best').
    also have an extensive wood and metalworking background, plus all tools
    and supplies neccessary...

    first "mind flash": project slides onto white wall (or da-lite screen,
    if I had one), then use digi-cam to take pix of results (some minor
    image distortion might result; one end of image bigger/wider than the
    other, right?

    2nd "mind flash": similar approach, but to eliminate the above 'too
    big@one side' image problem: project slides onto a piece of
    finely-ground window glass (have all the abrasives) arranged thus:

    camera ----------> | <------------- slide projector

    (the | above is the ground glass, upright/square/centered) in a dark
    room, suitable light shields employed)

    I'm -guessing- that, in the 'old days' there was such a thing as a
    'film strip' projector (very similar to a slide projector). I have photo
    apps that'll do the 'color swapping' and 'end to end' flipping, to make
    the neg images positive/correct in relation.

    also, 3rd "mind flash": would it be possible to project the slide images
    onto a wall, or screen at an 'intentionally unsquare in relation' screen
    angle, so that when I use the digi-cam, I'd 'reverse compensate the
    angle' and get rid of the parallel/big-ended final image problem on the
    end results, withOUT having to use the 'ground glass intermediate' step?

    ok, how 'bout this, my 'half a periscope' idea: project images onto a
    mirror at 45 degrees to camera center line, with camera at the 'other'
    45 degrees? or would that put me back into "way off at one end size of
    the image" city again?

    anybody ever tried any of these approaches? or are there any better,
    simpler, cheaper (or possibly more harebrained) ideas out there? if any
    of these ideas are workable, ANY of 'em would be -vastly- faster than my
    old slide scanner...

    come on - break loose with those ideas, guys :)

    toolie

    --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
    if reply by e-mail, pls remove the 'weirdstuff' from my address prior to
    clcking send. thanks
    --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
    dave, Oct 15, 2005
    #1
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  2. dave

    Laurent Guest

    Re: the no cost 'DIY only' approach - converting slides and neg's to digital ...

    "dave" <> a écrit dans le message de news:
    Am84f.488$AO5.269@dukeread01...
    > have the following problem, but no funds:
    > quickly and at no cost converting hundreds of 35mm neg's (cut to '5 negs
    > per strip') and also 35mm slides (similar quantities), to digital images,
    > hopefully at ZERO cost
    >
    > have the following equipment, and skills:
    > good digital camera, with 'base to tripod/mount' ability, a good tripod, a
    > 'working good' slide projector, a film and slide scanner (LS-1000 nikon,
    > but it's *painfully* slow, and the software is 'dicey at best'). also have
    > an extensive wood and metalworking background, plus all tools and supplies
    > neccessary...


    Doesn't the "good digital camera" have a macro function ? If so, maybe could
    you try the following one ?

    O <--- Camera
    --- <--- Slide/Film strip
    ___ <--- "finely-ground window glass" you already have ;-)
    O <--- Light source

    Laurent --> Tell us, it's an interesting topic imho
    --
    = http://www.laurent-roy.com =
    Laurent, Oct 15, 2005
    #2
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  3. dave

    Deedee Tee Guest

    Re: the no cost 'DIY only' approach - converting slides and neg's to digital ...

    On Sat, 15 Oct 2005 17:14:50 +0200, "Laurent"
    <> wrote:

    > O <--- Camera
    > --- <--- Slide/Film strip
    > ___ <--- "finely-ground window glass" you already have ;-)
    > O <--- Light source


    Yes, this is the way to go. Forget about the projector (except, you
    might use it as the light source in the above diagram). You better
    make a mount for the negatives and one for the slides, or you can use
    the mount that comes with the Nikon film scanner. Make a fixed setup
    so that you can quickly unmount the camera to use it in another way
    and reassemble it without changing its distance from the film carrier.
    If you can spare some money, you could even buy a slide copying
    attachment for your camera and save all this work.

    Some more tips:
    tracing paper makes a better diffuser than ground glass. Forget about
    etching the glass by yourself: lots of work, and likely it would not
    diffuse evenly across its surface. Sunlight would make a fine light
    source. If you use another source, you have to white-balance it (check
    the camera instructions). Dust on the films is going to be a problem,
    use a blower or a can of clean compressed air (not compressed air from
    a compressor, which contains oil and moisture). Place the diffuser a
    few cm behind the film, so dust on the diffuser and the grain of the
    diffuser will not show. Use in a dark room, or shelter the film
    surface facing toward the camera from light. You want the film to be
    illuminated only from behind.
    Deedee Tee, Oct 15, 2005
    #3
  4. dave

    Ben Brugman Guest

    Re: the no cost 'DIY only' approach - converting slides and neg's to digital ...

    If you want to work at speed a slide projector is a good idee.
    But it is very difficult to get an even illumination.
    (It's fast, it's cheap, but it's not good).

    To square the picture is fairly easy. Project the picture strait on
    the wall. And aim the camera strait on the wall. Problem the
    camera can not be in the same place (or same line) as the
    projector. So offset the camera with the amount needed and
    zoom out so that the slide is included completely in the frame.
    Yes now you have black borders of different sizes around
    the picture, you have to crop these.
    (This cropping can be done in a batch).

    Do not expect great quality with this method.

    ben brugman

    "dave" <> schreef in bericht news:Am84f.488$AO5.269@dukeread01...
    > have the following problem, but no funds:
    > quickly and at no cost converting hundreds of 35mm neg's (cut to '5 negs
    > per strip') and also 35mm slides (similar quantities), to digital
    > images, hopefully at ZERO cost
    >
    > have the following equipment, and skills:
    > good digital camera, with 'base to tripod/mount' ability, a good tripod,
    > a 'working good' slide projector, a film and slide scanner (LS-1000
    > nikon, but it's *painfully* slow, and the software is 'dicey at best').
    > also have an extensive wood and metalworking background, plus all tools
    > and supplies neccessary...
    >
    > first "mind flash": project slides onto white wall (or da-lite screen,
    > if I had one), then use digi-cam to take pix of results (some minor
    > image distortion might result; one end of image bigger/wider than the
    > other, right?
    >
    > 2nd "mind flash": similar approach, but to eliminate the above 'too
    > big@one side' image problem: project slides onto a piece of
    > finely-ground window glass (have all the abrasives) arranged thus:
    >
    > camera ----------> | <------------- slide projector
    >
    > (the | above is the ground glass, upright/square/centered) in a dark
    > room, suitable light shields employed)
    >
    > I'm -guessing- that, in the 'old days' there was such a thing as a
    > 'film strip' projector (very similar to a slide projector). I have photo
    > apps that'll do the 'color swapping' and 'end to end' flipping, to make
    > the neg images positive/correct in relation.
    >
    > also, 3rd "mind flash": would it be possible to project the slide images
    > onto a wall, or screen at an 'intentionally unsquare in relation' screen
    > angle, so that when I use the digi-cam, I'd 'reverse compensate the
    > angle' and get rid of the parallel/big-ended final image problem on the
    > end results, withOUT having to use the 'ground glass intermediate' step?
    >
    > ok, how 'bout this, my 'half a periscope' idea: project images onto a
    > mirror at 45 degrees to camera center line, with camera at the 'other'
    > 45 degrees? or would that put me back into "way off at one end size of
    > the image" city again?
    >
    > anybody ever tried any of these approaches? or are there any better,
    > simpler, cheaper (or possibly more harebrained) ideas out there? if any
    > of these ideas are workable, ANY of 'em would be -vastly- faster than my
    > old slide scanner...
    >
    > come on - break loose with those ideas, guys :)
    >
    > toolie
    >
    > --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
    > if reply by e-mail, pls remove the 'weirdstuff' from my address prior to
    > clcking send. thanks
    > --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
    Ben Brugman, Oct 15, 2005
    #4
  5. dave

    Doug Warner Guest

    Re: the no cost 'DIY only' approach - converting slides and neg's to digital ...

    dave <> wrote:

    >have the following problem, but no funds:
    >quickly and at no cost converting hundreds of 35mm neg's (cut to '5 negs
    >per strip') and also 35mm slides (similar quantities), to digital
    >images, hopefully at ZERO cost
    >


    Some years ago, I made this rig for my Nikon 950:
    http://webpages.charter.net/dwarner2/copystand.jpg

    An inexpensive light box, card stock mask with two-sided corner guide
    for the slides, and a plywood bridge to hold the camera.
    The bridge also helped keep ambient light off the top surface of the
    slide.
    Once set up, I could just slip the slide into the corner, and press
    the shutter button. Very fast, and no problem with alignment between
    slides.
    --
    Email reply: please remove one letter from each side of "@"
    Spammers are Scammers. Exterminate them.
    Doug Warner, Oct 16, 2005
    #5
  6. dave

    Laurent Guest

    Re: the no cost 'DIY only' approach - converting slides and neg's to digital ...

    "Doug Warner" <> a écrit dans le message de news:
    ...
    dave <> wrote:

    >>have the following problem, but no funds:
    >>quickly and at no cost converting hundreds of 35mm neg's (cut to '5 negs
    >>per strip') and also 35mm slides (similar quantities), to digital
    >>images, hopefully at ZERO cost
    >>

    >
    >Some years ago, I made this rig for my Nikon 950:
    >http://webpages.charter.net/dwarner2/copystand.jpg
    >
    >An inexpensive light box, card stock mask with two-sided corner guide
    >for the slides, and a plywood bridge to hold the camera.


    The light box looks a bit small to me : It's better when the light source is
    not too close to the slide/strip...

    >The bridge also helped keep ambient light off the top surface of the
    >slide.


    Painted black would have been better...

    Laurent --> But it worked fine ! ;-)
    --
    = http://www.laurent-roy.com =
    Laurent, Oct 16, 2005
    #6
  7. dave

    Doug Warner Guest

    Re: the no cost 'DIY only' approach - converting slides and neg's to digital ...

    "Laurent" <> wrote:

    >
    >The light box looks a bit small to me : It's better when the light source is
    >not too close to the slide/strip...
    >
    >>The bridge also helped keep ambient light off the top surface of the
    >>slide.

    >
    >Painted black would have been better...


    I reviewed a few in the store, where they had them plugged in. I
    picked the one with the most even light in the center area. Also, I
    painted the bottom of the mask white, to reflect light back inside,
    which helps the brightness a bit.

    Good idea on painting the interior of the bridge though, it would
    prevent any stray light from the slide itself reflecting back onto the
    surface.
    --
    Email reply: please remove one letter from each side of "@"
    Spammers are Scammers. Exterminate them.
    Doug Warner, Oct 17, 2005
    #7
  8. dave

    bob Guest

    Re: the no cost 'DIY only' approach - converting slides and neg's to digital ...

    "Laurent" <> wrote in
    news:43511ce5$0$455$-internet.fr:

    > Doesn't the "good digital camera" have a macro function ? If so, maybe
    > could you try the following one ?
    >
    > O <--- Camera
    > --- <--- Slide/Film strip
    > ___ <--- "finely-ground window glass" you already have ;-)
    > O <--- Light source
    >
    >


    The potential problem here is the lens probably isn't flat field. If you
    focus on the center, the edges will be out of focus. But it's worth a try.

    Bob

    --
    Delete the inverse SPAM to reply
    bob, Oct 19, 2005
    #8
  9. dave

    bob Guest

    Re: the no cost 'DIY only' approach - converting slides and neg's to digital ...

    "Ben Brugman" <> wrote in
    news::

    > If you want to work at speed a slide projector is a good idee.
    > But it is very difficult to get an even illumination.
    > (It's fast, it's cheap, but it's not good).
    >


    That's not a problem though, as long as it's consistent. Just shoot a test
    exposure on a blank frame and build a Photoshop script to fix it. You can
    correct any perspective problem at the same time.

    Bob

    --
    Delete the inverse SPAM to reply
    bob, Oct 19, 2005
    #9
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