The heartbreak of shutter lag

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mike Graham, Sep 20, 2003.

  1. Mike Graham

    Mike Graham Guest

    There I was... walking in the back field with the dogs. Sometimes I leave
    the dogs behind because they scare off the geese. This time of year the
    property is just *lousy* with geese.
    I had my camera.
    I walked through the woods, taking a couple of shots that had interesting
    lighting elements, and continued on to the lake. I couldn't hear any geese,
    so I let the dogs go on ahead for a swim.
    I was walking along the south tree-line of the property when a solitary
    'honk' wafted through the trees. Barney-The-Yellow-Lab stopped dead in his
    tracks, then charged through the trees. A deafening cacophony of goose
    calls assaulted my ears as a veritable squadron of geese flew low over the
    trees, right over my head, and over to the pond. It was a magical
    opportunity.
    Or would have been. Do you know how long it takes to set an Oly 3020 to
    manual focus mode and set the focal length? Way too long. I had to leave
    it in auto-focus and take my chances. Oh, the lag! It was excruciating! I
    got half a dozen shots, some of them not too bad, but I am positively
    melancholy thinking of the shots I *could* have had with a longer lens and a
    faster camera. Sigh.

    --
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    Mike Graham | Metalworker, rustic, part-time zealot.
    mike 'at' metalmangler.com |
    <http://www.metalmangler.com>| Caledon, Ontario, Canada

    Lousy photographer with a really nice camera - Olympus C3020Zoom.
    <http://www.metalmangler.com/photos/photos.htm>
    <http://www.photo.net/shared/community-member?user_id=766040>
     
    Mike Graham, Sep 20, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Shutter lag is a problem with most consumer level digital cameras. It is
    improving, and many models are better than the 3020 which is over a year
    old, but it's still there. There are a couple of way around most of this:

    1) Buy a "fixed focus" camera such as the slim Casio EX-S3 (3 megapixel).
    It is fixed and does not use auto focus, so you just turn it on (starts up
    quick) push the shutter, and it takes the pic with no delay for focusing.
    You lose a zoom as it has none, and the pic quality is not quite as good as
    an auto-focus 3 megapixel camera, but you gain speed, and pocketability
    (it's very thin).

    2) Buy a digital SLR such as the Canon 10D or Canon digital Rebel. Digital
    SLRs are much quicker and have nearly none to no shutter lag compared to
    consumer level cameras. You gain speed, but pick up a much larger camera
    and pay $$ for it compared to consumer level cameras.

    or..

    3) Wait. The speed is increasing all the time. Within 5 years, no doubt
    the $300 consumer cameras will be much much quicker than today's models.


    Greg
    ---------
    www.digitalcamerabasics.com



    "Mike Graham" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There I was... walking in the back field with the dogs. Sometimes I

    leave
    > the dogs behind because they scare off the geese. This time of year the
    > property is just *lousy* with geese.
    > I had my camera.
    > I walked through the woods, taking a couple of shots that had

    interesting
    > lighting elements, and continued on to the lake. I couldn't hear any

    geese,
    > so I let the dogs go on ahead for a swim.
    > I was walking along the south tree-line of the property when a solitary
    > 'honk' wafted through the trees. Barney-The-Yellow-Lab stopped dead in

    his
    > tracks, then charged through the trees. A deafening cacophony of goose
    > calls assaulted my ears as a veritable squadron of geese flew low over the
    > trees, right over my head, and over to the pond. It was a magical
    > opportunity.
    > Or would have been. Do you know how long it takes to set an Oly 3020 to
    > manual focus mode and set the focal length? Way too long. I had to leave
    > it in auto-focus and take my chances. Oh, the lag! It was excruciating!

    I
    > got half a dozen shots, some of them not too bad, but I am positively
    > melancholy thinking of the shots I *could* have had with a longer lens and

    a
    > faster camera. Sigh.
    >
    > --
    > =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    > Mike Graham | Metalworker, rustic, part-time zealot.
    > mike 'at' metalmangler.com |
    > <http://www.metalmangler.com>| Caledon, Ontario, Canada
    >
    > Lousy photographer with a really nice camera - Olympus C3020Zoom.
    > <http://www.metalmangler.com/photos/photos.htm>
    > <http://www.photo.net/shared/community-member?user_id=766040>
     
    DigitalCameraBasics, Sep 20, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Mike Graham

    JIM Guest

    "Mike Graham" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There I was... walking ....<cut>.... the shots I *could* have had with a

    longer lens and a
    > faster camera. Sigh.
    >


    Mike, you musta missed the long diatribes spoofing all that fast fps malarky
    for sports photog, etc.. They would have you to know that it is all in
    "timing the shot," so you should have had no trouble with anything to do
    with shutter lag much less a slow camera;)

    Shoot'em up, fast or slow, Agfa, Fuji, Kodak and all the rest will love you
    for it!!

    Jim
     
    JIM, Sep 20, 2003
    #3
  4. Mike Graham

    Charlie D Guest

    In article <LsZab.6831$>,
    "JIM" <> wrote:

    > Mike, you musta missed the long diatribes spoofing all that fast fps malarky
    > for sports photog, etc.. They would have you to know that it is all in
    > "timing the shot," so you should have had no trouble with anything to do
    > with shutter lag much less a slow camera;)


    That was on the 35mm equipment NG.

    > Shoot'em up, fast or slow, Agfa, Fuji, Kodak and all the rest will love you
    > for it!!


    Not with an Oly 3030. ;)

    --
    Charlie Dilks
    Newark, DE USA
     
    Charlie D, Sep 20, 2003
    #4
  5. Mike Graham

    JunkMonkey Guest

    Mike, I think it may be your mindset as much as it is your camera. I have
    come to the conclusion that Digital Photography requires a different
    approach to capturing that "decisive moment". And I think that eventually
    even professional level cameras will start to drift away from the SLR model
    as that is really a model designed to solve the problems of a film based
    camera with a clockwork driven shutter mechanism.

    I have taken to leaving my G3 in shutter speed priority and manual focus
    mode with the focus bracketing set to on. I set the shutter speed, iso
    settings and focus bracket setting to something appropriate for the area and
    then when I see something, I quickly set the focus (The canon G series wheel
    is a real help), and shoot. The focus bracketing takes 3 photos in about 1
    second 1 at your focus setting, 1 closer than your focus setting and 1
    farther away. The variance depends on the focus bracket setting.

    I rarely use the full auto mode anymore and the technical quality of my
    images has gone up (though the quality of my PHOTOGRAPHS is improving much
    more slowly)


    "Mike Graham" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There I was... walking in the back field with the dogs. Sometimes I

    leave
    > the dogs behind because they scare off the geese. This time of year the
    > property is just *lousy* with geese.
    > I had my camera.
    > I walked through the woods, taking a couple of shots that had

    interesting
    > lighting elements, and continued on to the lake. I couldn't hear any

    geese,
    > so I let the dogs go on ahead for a swim.
    > I was walking along the south tree-line of the property when a solitary
    > 'honk' wafted through the trees. Barney-The-Yellow-Lab stopped dead in

    his
    > tracks, then charged through the trees. A deafening cacophony of goose
    > calls assaulted my ears as a veritable squadron of geese flew low over the
    > trees, right over my head, and over to the pond. It was a magical
    > opportunity.
    > Or would have been. Do you know how long it takes to set an Oly 3020 to
    > manual focus mode and set the focal length? Way too long. I had to leave
    > it in auto-focus and take my chances. Oh, the lag! It was excruciating!

    I
    > got half a dozen shots, some of them not too bad, but I am positively
    > melancholy thinking of the shots I *could* have had with a longer lens and

    a
    > faster camera. Sigh.
    >
    > --
    > =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    > Mike Graham | Metalworker, rustic, part-time zealot.
    > mike 'at' metalmangler.com |
    > <http://www.metalmangler.com>| Caledon, Ontario, Canada
    >
    > Lousy photographer with a really nice camera - Olympus C3020Zoom.
    > <http://www.metalmangler.com/photos/photos.htm>
    > <http://www.photo.net/shared/community-member?user_id=766040>
     
    JunkMonkey, Sep 20, 2003
    #5
  6. Mike Graham

    Ms. Jaime Guest

    On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 09:33:22 -0400, Mike Graham
    <> wrote:

    > I am positively
    >melancholy thinking of the shots I *could* have had with a longer lens and a
    >faster camera. Sigh.


    So go *BUY* one!! :)



    Ms.Jaime
     
    Ms. Jaime, Sep 20, 2003
    #6
  7. Mike Graham

    Bob D. Guest

    Wait a minute, is shutter lag the fault of "digital" or is it the fault of
    "point and shoot"? Seems to me a film "point and shoot" camera would have
    the same lag as a digital "point and shoot" camera. I never owned a "point
    and shoot" film camera. All my film cameras are manual focus, so there's
    nothing to wait for when activating the shutter. I think a lot of us
    "hobbyists" are in this boat. Our first experience with a "point and shoot"
    camera is digital, because almost all digital cameras are "point and shoot".

    I would think, the only lag uniquely inherent to digital is the time it
    takes to write to the memory card. But this happens after the exposure!

    My Olympus C-4000 has a manual focus mode and something called full-time
    auto focus. I haven't tried these out yet. Perhaps they will eliminate the
    lag. Has anyone successfully eliminated "the lag" by changing the camera
    settings?

    --
    Bob D.
     
    Bob D., Sep 20, 2003
    #7
  8. Most 35mm cameras that have auto focus will have a short delay as the camera
    focuses then "beeps" to let you know it's locked on. Once you press the
    shutter, some may have a slight delay but many of them are pretty instant
    once the focus is locked on. Digital camera's electronics are a little
    different, and have been notorious for adding a bit more of a delay once the
    shutter button is pressed, on top of focusing time. They are getting faster
    with each generation of cams, but some still have them. "Continuing focus"
    such as on the C4000 helps to speed things up, but uses more battery power.


    Greg




    "Bob D." <> wrote in message
    news:aF1bb.530181$o%2.232671@sccrnsc02...
    > Wait a minute, is shutter lag the fault of "digital" or is it the fault of
    > "point and shoot"? Seems to me a film "point and shoot" camera would have
    > the same lag as a digital "point and shoot" camera. I never owned a "point
    > and shoot" film camera. All my film cameras are manual focus, so there's
    > nothing to wait for when activating the shutter. I think a lot of us
    > "hobbyists" are in this boat. Our first experience with a "point and

    shoot"
    > camera is digital, because almost all digital cameras are "point and

    shoot".
    >
    > I would think, the only lag uniquely inherent to digital is the time it
    > takes to write to the memory card. But this happens after the exposure!
    >
    > My Olympus C-4000 has a manual focus mode and something called full-time
    > auto focus. I haven't tried these out yet. Perhaps they will eliminate the
    > lag. Has anyone successfully eliminated "the lag" by changing the camera
    > settings?
    >
    > --
    > Bob D.
    >
    >
     
    DigitalCameraBasics, Sep 20, 2003
    #8
  9. Mike Graham

    Ms. Jaime Guest


    >"Bob D." <> wrote in message
    >news:aF1bb.530181$o%2.232671@sccrnsc02...
    >> Has anyone successfully eliminated "the lag" by changing the camera
    >> settings?


    I'm hoping to find more on this subject when I print out the
    totally *complete* manual from the CD that came with my 750.

    Ms.Jaime
     
    Ms. Jaime, Sep 20, 2003
    #9
  10. Mike Graham

    Bob D. Guest

    So it's true it say that "shutter lag" is not inherent to digital
    photography, it's just the way the manufactures have chosen to mechanize the
    cameras.

    After studying the manual and snapping some shots, I found two ways to
    eliminate the "shutter lag" on my Olympus C-4000.

    1. Hold the shutter button down half way to pre-focus and pre-exposure-set.
    When the shutter button is pressed the rest of the way the shutter will fire
    immediately. This is a bit awkward. It would be much better to have a
    separate button to "arm" this mode, so you wouldn't have to hold the shutter
    button.

    2. Set the camera to manual focus, and activate the auto exposure lock. Just
    turning off the auto-focus still leaves some delay. Evidently setting
    exposure "on the fly" still takes some time.

    --
    Bob D.

    "DigitalCameraBasics" <> wrote in message
    news:VM1bb.46501$...
    > Most 35mm cameras that have auto focus will have a short delay as the

    camera
    > focuses then "beeps" to let you know it's locked on. Once you press the
    > shutter, some may have a slight delay but many of them are pretty instant
    > once the focus is locked on. Digital camera's electronics are a little
    > different, and have been notorious for adding a bit more of a delay once

    the
    > shutter button is pressed, on top of focusing time. They are getting

    faster
    > with each generation of cams, but some still have them. "Continuing

    focus"
    > such as on the C4000 helps to speed things up, but uses more battery

    power.
    >
    >
    > Greg
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Bob D." <> wrote in message
    > news:aF1bb.530181$o%2.232671@sccrnsc02...
    > > Wait a minute, is shutter lag the fault of "digital" or is it the fault

    of
    > > "point and shoot"? Seems to me a film "point and shoot" camera would

    have
    > > the same lag as a digital "point and shoot" camera. I never owned a

    "point
    > > and shoot" film camera. All my film cameras are manual focus, so there's
    > > nothing to wait for when activating the shutter. I think a lot of us
    > > "hobbyists" are in this boat. Our first experience with a "point and

    > shoot"
    > > camera is digital, because almost all digital cameras are "point and

    > shoot".
    > >
    > > I would think, the only lag uniquely inherent to digital is the time it
    > > takes to write to the memory card. But this happens after the exposure!
    > >
    > > My Olympus C-4000 has a manual focus mode and something called full-time
    > > auto focus. I haven't tried these out yet. Perhaps they will eliminate

    the
    > > lag. Has anyone successfully eliminated "the lag" by changing the camera
    > > settings?
    > >
    > > --
    > > Bob D.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Bob D., Sep 20, 2003
    #10
  11. Mike Graham

    Ellestad Guest

    Shutter lag has always been a problem with autofocus cameras - especially
    the cheaper ones. As autofocus improved the shutter response got quicker. My
    ageing Canon Eos 1N's are spectacularly fast. In application, timing the
    shot for the "magic moment" is part of the scheme but we don't always win
    the anticipation game. Pros doing bigtime sports really run the motor.

    Tim

    "Bob D." <> wrote in message
    news:aF1bb.530181$o%2.232671@sccrnsc02...
    > Wait a minute, is shutter lag the fault of "digital" or is it the fault of
    > "point and shoot"? Seems to me a film "point and shoot" camera would have
    > the same lag as a digital "point and shoot" camera. I never owned a "point
    > and shoot" film camera. All my film cameras are manual focus, so there's
    > nothing to wait for when activating the shutter. I think a lot of us
    > "hobbyists" are in this boat. Our first experience with a "point and

    shoot"
    > camera is digital, because almost all digital cameras are "point and

    shoot".
    >
    > I would think, the only lag uniquely inherent to digital is the time it
    > takes to write to the memory card. But this happens after the exposure!
    >
    > My Olympus C-4000 has a manual focus mode and something called full-time
    > auto focus. I haven't tried these out yet. Perhaps they will eliminate the
    > lag. Has anyone successfully eliminated "the lag" by changing the camera
    > settings?
    >
    > --
    > Bob D.
    >
    >
     
    Ellestad, Sep 20, 2003
    #11
  12. Mike Graham

    Mike Graham Guest

    In article <>, Wombat wrote:

    > From what you said about wanting a longer lens I gather that the geese
    > were not too close.


    Thirty feet away or so.

    > You should have set your F-stop to >5.6 and set
    > the focus to a little less than infinity. The depth of field you
    > would get would put almost everything from 20 foot to mars in focus.


    I didn't have time to try to do this on the Oly. Mind you, I might have
    not had time to do this on an SLR, either.

    > And no it dosn't take a long time to lock the focus in under manual.
    > While in auto point to something at the right distance


    When you're trying to focus on a bird in the air, what do you pick as
    'something at the right distance'?

    --
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    Mike Graham | Metalworker, rustic, part-time zealot.
    mike 'at' metalmangler.com |
    <http://www.metalmangler.com>| Caledon, Ontario, Canada

    Lousy photographer with a really nice camera - Olympus C3020Zoom.
    <http://www.metalmangler.com/photos/photos.htm>
    <http://www.photo.net/shared/community-member?user_id=766040>
     
    Mike Graham, Sep 21, 2003
    #12
  13. Mike Graham

    Paul Heslop Guest

    Mike Graham wrote:
    >
    > There I was... walking in the back field with the dogs. Sometimes I leave
    > the dogs behind because they scare off the geese. This time of year the
    > property is just *lousy* with geese.
    > I had my camera.
    > I walked through the woods, taking a couple of shots that had interesting
    > lighting elements, and continued on to the lake. I couldn't hear any geese,
    > so I let the dogs go on ahead for a swim.
    > I was walking along the south tree-line of the property when a solitary
    > 'honk' wafted through the trees. Barney-The-Yellow-Lab stopped dead in his
    > tracks, then charged through the trees. A deafening cacophony of goose
    > calls assaulted my ears as a veritable squadron of geese flew low over the
    > trees, right over my head, and over to the pond. It was a magical
    > opportunity.
    > Or would have been. Do you know how long it takes to set an Oly 3020 to
    > manual focus mode and set the focal length? Way too long. I had to leave
    > it in auto-focus and take my chances. Oh, the lag! It was excruciating! I
    > got half a dozen shots, some of them not too bad, but I am positively
    > melancholy thinking of the shots I *could* have had with a longer lens and a
    > faster camera. Sigh.
    >

    It is sad how much stuff can be missed this way.

    --
    Paul. (Don't ever stand aside, Don't ever be denied)
    --------------------------------------------------------------
    Not what it seems...
    http://www.geocities.com/dreamst8me/
     
    Paul Heslop, Sep 21, 2003
    #13
  14. Good point. This has NOTHING to do with digital. It has everything to do
    with camera design and intent.

    The shutter lag in my Leica M6 is imperceptible. The camera was designed
    that way on purpose.

    Any P&S camera will exhibit this. Get a DSLR of you want to get even
    remotely close to what an M6 or an F5 can do...



    Bob D." <> wrote in message
    news:aF1bb.530181$o%2.232671@sccrnsc02...
    > Wait a minute, is shutter lag the fault of "digital" or is it the fault of
    > "point and shoot"? Seems to me a film "point and shoot" camera would have
    > the same lag as a digital "point and shoot" camera. I never owned a "point
    > and shoot" film camera. All my film cameras are manual focus, so there's
    > nothing to wait for when activating the shutter. I think a lot of us
    > "hobbyists" are in this boat. Our first experience with a "point and

    shoot"
    > camera is digital, because almost all digital cameras are "point and

    shoot".
    >
    > I would think, the only lag uniquely inherent to digital is the time it
    > takes to write to the memory card. But this happens after the exposure!
    >
    > My Olympus C-4000 has a manual focus mode and something called full-time
    > auto focus. I haven't tried these out yet. Perhaps they will eliminate the
    > lag. Has anyone successfully eliminated "the lag" by changing the camera
    > settings?
    >
    > --
    > Bob D.
    >
    >
     
    Derek Zoolander, Sep 21, 2003
    #14
  15. Mike Graham

    Wombat Guest

    From what you said about wanting a longer lens I gather that the geese
    were not too close. You should have set your F-stop to >5.6 and set
    the focus to a little less than infinity. The depth of field you
    would get would put almost everything from 20 foot to mars in focus.

    And no it dosn't take a long time to lock the focus in under manual.
    While in auto point to something at the right distance and give a half
    push, then hit the OK button. Focus locked.


    On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 09:33:22 -0400, Mike Graham
    <> wrote:

    > There I was... walking in the back field with the dogs. Sometimes I leave
    >the dogs behind because they scare off the geese. This time of year the
    >property is just *lousy* with geese.
    > I had my camera.
    > I walked through the woods, taking a couple of shots that had interesting
    >lighting elements, and continued on to the lake. I couldn't hear any geese,
    >so I let the dogs go on ahead for a swim.
    > I was walking along the south tree-line of the property when a solitary
    >'honk' wafted through the trees. Barney-The-Yellow-Lab stopped dead in his
    >tracks, then charged through the trees. A deafening cacophony of goose
    >calls assaulted my ears as a veritable squadron of geese flew low over the
    >trees, right over my head, and over to the pond. It was a magical
    >opportunity.
    > Or would have been. Do you know how long it takes to set an Oly 3020 to
    >manual focus mode and set the focal length? Way too long. I had to leave
    >it in auto-focus and take my chances. Oh, the lag! It was excruciating! I
    >got half a dozen shots, some of them not too bad, but I am positively
    >melancholy thinking of the shots I *could* have had with a longer lens and a
    >faster camera. Sigh.
     
    Wombat, Sep 21, 2003
    #15
  16. Mike Graham <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > There I was... walking in the back field with the dogs. Sometimes I leave
    > the dogs behind because they scare off the geese. This time of year the
    > property is just *lousy* with geese.
    > I had my camera.
    > I walked through the woods, taking a couple of shots that had interesting
    > lighting elements, and continued on to the lake. I couldn't hear any geese,
    > so I let the dogs go on ahead for a swim.
    > I was walking along the south tree-line of the property when a solitary
    > 'honk' wafted through the trees. Barney-The-Yellow-Lab stopped dead in his
    > tracks, then charged through the trees. A deafening cacophony of goose
    > calls assaulted my ears as a veritable squadron of geese flew low over the
    > trees, right over my head, and over to the pond. It was a magical
    > opportunity.
    > Or would have been. Do you know how long it takes to set an Oly 3020 to
    > manual focus mode and set the focal length? Way too long. I had to leave
    > it in auto-focus and take my chances. Oh, the lag! It was excruciating! I
    > got half a dozen shots, some of them not too bad, but I am positively
    > melancholy thinking of the shots I *could* have had with a longer lens and a
    > faster camera. Sigh.



    Get a manual focus film camera.
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Sep 21, 2003
    #16
  17. Mike Graham

    Guest

    Thanks very much for this tip (I posted a day or so again on the same
    problem - I just didn't know the name for it was shutter lag). Just
    shows I should have spent more time reading the manual for my C3030.
    I'll try clicking the OK button while having the shutter button
    half-pushed. Thankfully after a lot of practice I am now able to push
    half-way without taking a picture most of the time.
    Again, this is a great group - thanks for the advice!
    Rich


    On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 18:07:23 -0700, Wombat
    <> wrote:

    >From what you said about wanting a longer lens I gather that the geese
    >were not too close. You should have set your F-stop to >5.6 and set
    >the focus to a little less than infinity. The depth of field you
    >would get would put almost everything from 20 foot to mars in focus.
    >
    >And no it dosn't take a long time to lock the focus in under manual.
    >While in auto point to something at the right distance and give a half
    >push, then hit the OK button. Focus locked.
    >
    >
    >On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 09:33:22 -0400, Mike Graham
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> There I was... walking in the back field with the dogs. Sometimes I leave
    >>the dogs behind because they scare off the geese. This time of year the
    >>property is just *lousy* with geese.
    >> I had my camera.
    >> I walked through the woods, taking a couple of shots that had interesting
    >>lighting elements, and continued on to the lake. I couldn't hear any geese,
    >>so I let the dogs go on ahead for a swim.
    >> I was walking along the south tree-line of the property when a solitary
    >>'honk' wafted through the trees. Barney-The-Yellow-Lab stopped dead in his
    >>tracks, then charged through the trees. A deafening cacophony of goose
    >>calls assaulted my ears as a veritable squadron of geese flew low over the
    >>trees, right over my head, and over to the pond. It was a magical
    >>opportunity.
    >> Or would have been. Do you know how long it takes to set an Oly 3020 to
    >>manual focus mode and set the focal length? Way too long. I had to leave
    >>it in auto-focus and take my chances. Oh, the lag! It was excruciating! I
    >>got half a dozen shots, some of them not too bad, but I am positively
    >>melancholy thinking of the shots I *could* have had with a longer lens and a
    >>faster camera. Sigh.
     
    , Sep 21, 2003
    #17
  18. Mike Graham

    Mike Graham Guest

    In article <>, Wombat wrote:

    > While in auto point to something at the right distance and give a half
    > push, then hit the OK button. Focus locked.


    I have read the manual several times from end to end, and don't remember
    seeing a reference to this before. I'm glad you told me... thanks.

    --
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    Mike Graham | Metalworker, rustic, part-time zealot.
    mike 'at' metalmangler.com |
    <http://www.metalmangler.com>| Caledon, Ontario, Canada

    Lousy photographer with a really nice camera - Olympus C3020Zoom.
    <http://www.metalmangler.com/photos/photos.htm>
    <http://www.photo.net/shared/community-member?user_id=766040>
     
    Mike Graham, Sep 21, 2003
    #18
  19. Mike Graham <> wrote:

    > Or would have been. Do you know how long it takes to set an Oly 3020 to
    >manual focus mode and set the focal length? Way too long. I had to leave
    >it in auto-focus and take my chances. Oh, the lag! It was excruciating!


    Mike,

    just want to mention that you're not actually talking about
    shutter lag, but mainly about autofocus time.

    Hans-Georg

    --
    No mail, please.
     
    Hans-Georg Michna, Sep 21, 2003
    #19
  20. Mike Graham

    J. B. Dalton Guest

    Mike Graham wrote:

    >... Oh, the lag! It was excruciating! I
    > got half a dozen shots, some of them not too bad, but I am positively
    > melancholy thinking of the shots I *could* have had with a longer lens and a
    > faster camera. Sigh.
    >


    Sympathy, Mike. I wanted to take live macro pictures of small killifish,
    and got to my 4th digital camera before I quit taking pictures of fish
    tails as they left the field-of-view. :) [OK, I'm a slow learner!]

    Small active children, pets, and wildlife rarely give you the luxury of
    selecting the precise time for taking a picture. A couple of my early
    digitals had truly unergonomic "half-press" designs, so *no* amount of
    practice allowed reliable pre-setting of focus and exposure in any
    really exciting situation. I got lots of pictures of everything but the
    desired subject!

    I ended up with a very early version of the DSLR, a Sony DSC-D770. It
    has a great "half-press" function, and is easy to focus with the big
    ring around the lens if I don't want autofocus. It is really
    focus-by-wire, but has a good feel and is just like a mechanical focus
    in most usage.

    In fact, when it was stolen last spring, I bought another to replace it.
    I couldn't find a newer camera I could afford that even came close.

    I use close-up lenses to get more macro, and a 1.5X tele-extender to go
    really long for those distant deer and mountain sheep. With the original
    5X zoom, that has been enough for me for any situation. In the field, I
    often leave the tele on, as I feel I can get it off quicker than I can
    screw it on, if I need to.

    Check the "half-press" on any camera you are thinking of getting. It
    must be easy to set and hold until the exact moment, and that may mean
    quite a few seconds, sometimes.

    Use extension lenses for most cameras, as any zoom over about 3X (5X
    with linked motor-driven focus) will tend to have too much aberration,
    be too slow, or be way too heavy to carry. Avoid the cheapy extenders,
    as they are often little more than junk.

    Since I feel I have overcome your woes for my photography, I hope some
    of my solutions help you.

    JBD
     
    J. B. Dalton, Sep 21, 2003
    #20
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