The first formats of video.

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Tom McCafferty, Mar 5, 2004.

  1. I remember something called, U-matic?
     
    Tom McCafferty, Mar 5, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Tom McCafferty

    jayembee Guest

    Tom McCafferty <> wrote:

    > I remember something called, U-matic?


    Made by Sony. Wasn't a consumer format, though. It was mostly
    used by industry people. Before that, there were reel-to-reel
    video decks.

    The first consumer video format was Betamax.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Mar 5, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Tom McCafferty

    Richard C. Guest

    "Tom McCafferty" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    : I remember something called, U-matic?
    :
    ===========
    The first formats for consumers were 8mm and 16mm film.
    I have a 400 page catalog featuring 16mm films for the consumer.

    Laser disc actually was developed before VHS.
    A 1980 catalog I have lists the following formats for the movies it
    offers:

    1) Beta
    2) VHS
    3) Quasar
    4) Sanyo
    5) EIAJ (1/" tape)
    6) 3/4" U-Matic
    7) 1" Broadcast type C
    8) 2" Quadraplex Open Reel (tape)
    9) Laser Optical Disc
    10) Capacitance electronic disc (CED)

    I have a 1971 Stereo Review that discusses "Video Cartridges" and
    mentions the following:
    EVR, Selectavision, magnetic tape from JVC and Ampex.

    I also have one from the mid 1970's (can't find it right now) that
    discusses laser discs.
    ================
     
    Richard C., Mar 5, 2004
    #3
  4. On 5 Mar 2004 05:46:44 -0800, (jayembee)
    wrote:

    >Tom McCafferty <> wrote:
    >
    >> I remember something called, U-matic?

    >
    >Made by Sony. Wasn't a consumer format, though. It was mostly
    >used by industry people. Before that, there were reel-to-reel
    >video decks.
    >
    >The first consumer video format was Betamax.


    The first Consumer format was CV-video, 1966 from Sony.
    Then came Cartrivision, 1970,
    Kodak Vision, 1971, (a video-on-film abortion)
    3/4" Umatic positioned as a consumer format (the Sony 1000-series
    with tuners) 1972,
    J-format (EIAJ-1) various from 1968 to 1977.
    Aiwa 8mm (Reel to Reel) Ca. 1974.
    Betamax 1975,
    Motorola GTM 1976,
    JVC VHS, 1976/7,
    Sanyo V-Cord, 1977,
    SuperBeta 1982,
    Beta ED 1986/7,
    SuperVHS, 1985.
    Kodak/Technicolor 8mm, 1981
    8mm 1982
    Hi8, I'm not sure, 1990?
    DVcam/MiniDV 1994

    .Steve .


    >
    >-- jayembee
     
    Steve(JazzHunter), Mar 5, 2004
    #4
  5. Tom McCafferty

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Tom McCafferty" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I remember something called, U-matic?


    You might be interested in this, the "Museum of Extinct Video Tape
    Recorders" --

    http://www.labguysworld.com/Museum001.htm

    RichC
     
    Rich Clark, Mar 5, 2004
    #5
  6. Tom McCafferty

    Cyclograph Guest

    On Fri, 5 Mar 2004 07:25:36 -0800, "Richard C." <post-age
    @spamcop.net> wrote:

    >"Tom McCafferty" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >: I remember something called, U-matic?
    >:
    >===========
    >The first formats for consumers were 8mm and 16mm film.
    >I have a 400 page catalog featuring 16mm films for the consumer.


    Though the first consumer -video- format was PhonoVision developed by
    John Baird ca 1925... though PhonoVision and the entire mechanical TV
    system it utilized was quickly obsoleted by the electronic systems
    introduced shortly thereafter.

    -KD

    --
    To reply via email: this ID @<a well known service related to yodeling>.com
     
    Cyclograph, Mar 6, 2004
    #6
  7. On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 02:58:32 GMT, Cyclograph <>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 5 Mar 2004 07:25:36 -0800, "Richard C." <post-age
    >@spamcop.net> wrote:
    >
    >>"Tom McCafferty" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>: I remember something called, U-matic?
    >>:
    >>===========
    >>The first formats for consumers were 8mm and 16mm film.
    >>I have a 400 page catalog featuring 16mm films for the consumer.

    >
    >Though the first consumer -video- format was PhonoVision developed by
    >John Baird ca 1925... though PhonoVision and the entire mechanical TV
    >system it utilized was quickly obsoleted by the electronic systems
    >introduced shortly thereafter.
    >
    > -KD


    Phonovision records were indeed the first video format aimed for
    in-home playback, though they never got the sync problems solved.
    Film is not a "video" format, Sony CV skip-field recorders, the
    CV2000, were offered with a timer and tuner and were the first
    RERECORDABLE home video machines in 1966.

    . Steve .
     
    Steve(JazzHunter), Mar 6, 2004
    #7
  8. Tom McCafferty

    Bill Guest

    "Cyclograph" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 5 Mar 2004 07:25:36 -0800, "Richard C." <post-age
    > @spamcop.net> wrote:
    >
    > >"Tom McCafferty" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...
    > >: I remember something called, U-matic?


    U-matic was introduced sometime in the late 60s, and utilized 3/4" videotape
    housed in a cassette shell. I believe Sony intended it for the home video
    market, but it instead gained popularity for industrial use and the
    broadcast field.

    U-matic was an important step. The Betamax can be considered, in some ways,
    to be U-matic's "little brother." It was introduced a few years later, and
    the first Betamax unit looked very much like a smaller version of a U-matic
    machine. One difference was in tape handling. U-matic VTRs would retract the
    videotape back into the cassette shell during fast forward/rewinding (as all
    VHS decks did for many years), whereas the tape always remained wrapped
    around the video head drum in Betamax units, with the exception of a few
    Sanyo models.
     
    Bill, Mar 6, 2004
    #8
  9. Tom McCafferty

    JohnW248 Guest

    In article <>, "Steve(JazzHunter)"
    <> writes:

    >Kodak Vision, 1971, (a video-on-film abortion)


    Or are you thinking of the CBS device (EVR) which was super8 black and white
    film with color information encoded in half the frame area. It was read by a
    flying spot scanner. I think the units were finally closed out by Polypacs to
    experimenters for about $29.99.
     
    JohnW248, Mar 6, 2004
    #9
  10. Tom McCafferty

    Bill Guest


    > Or are you thinking of the CBS device (EVR) which was super8 black and

    white
    > film with color information encoded in half the frame area. It was read by

    a
    > flying spot scanner. I think the units were finally closed out by Polypacs

    to
    > experimenters for about $29.99.
    >
    >


    I received an Etco catalog years ago with these liquidated units on sale.
    They didn't mention the manufacturer, but you could plainly see the letters
    "EVR" in one of the photos.

    RCA, I remember reading at the time, was experimenting with a tape system
    that was to utilize holographic technology in some way. I believe that was
    when they first coined the term "Selectavision," some years before CED.
     
    Bill, Mar 6, 2004
    #10
  11. Tom McCafferty

    DarkMatter Guest

    On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 17:17:29 GMT, "Bill" <> Gave us:

    >
    >RCA, I remember reading at the time, was experimenting with a tape system
    >that was to utilize holographic technology in some way. I believe that was
    >when they first coined the term "Selectavision," some years before CED.


    Since holograms were barely even being experimented with in college
    labs, I'd say that "some holographic technology" has to be pretty far
    off the mark.
     
    DarkMatter, Mar 6, 2004
    #11
  12. On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 17:17:29 GMT, "Bill" <> wrote:

    >
    >> Or are you thinking of the CBS device (EVR) which was super8 black and

    >white
    >> film with color information encoded in half the frame area. It was read by

    >a
    >> flying spot scanner. I think the units were finally closed out by Polypacs

    >to
    >> experimenters for about $29.99.


    Yes I think that was it. I only once physically saw the unit once many
    years ago. Hiowever it didn't record so I guess it doesn't belong on
    the list.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >I received an Etco catalog years ago with these liquidated units on sale.
    >They didn't mention the manufacturer, but you could plainly see the letters
    >"EVR" in one of the photos.
    >
    >RCA, I remember reading at the time, was experimenting with a tape system
    >that was to utilize holographic technology in some way. I believe that was
    >when they first coined the term "Selectavision," some years before CED.


    Yes that's right. I also ded read an article about using holographic
    scrambling on an optical media to get more information in a given
    space and to add error-correction.



    . Steve ..
    >
     
    Steve(JazzHunter), Mar 6, 2004
    #12
  13. Tom McCafferty

    DarkMatter Guest

    On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 15:01:57 -0500, "Steve(JazzHunter)"
    <> Gave us:

    >
    >Yes that's right. I also ded read an article about using holographic
    >scrambling on an optical media to get more information in a given
    >space and to add error-correction.


    Since optical media readers are currently lineal read devices, I'd
    say that one that scans holographic anything would be too cost
    ineffective for the manufacturers and too pricey for consumers as
    well. Better to have inner hub data that gets read by players, but
    never get burned in a copy process. They already encode disc ID info
    there, and that does not get copied when a disc copy is made. no
    matter how good the copy software is. The laser head doesn't read
    that area during data reads. A home player could, though, and could
    use it to ID TRUE discs from a fucking copy.

    All you "back it up" retards should learn that the only thing you'll
    have is VHS or a downconverted VCD form factor at your disposal.
    Bit for bit copying will be a thing of the past. If that isn't good
    enough... too fucking bad.

    GOOD.
     
    DarkMatter, Mar 6, 2004
    #13
  14. On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 12:20:02 -0800, DarkMatter
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 15:01:57 -0500, "Steve(JazzHunter)"
    ><> Gave us:
    >
    >>
    >>Yes that's right. I also ded read an article about using holographic
    >>scrambling on an optical media to get more information in a given
    >>space and to add error-correction.

    >
    > Since optical media readers are currently lineal read devices, I'd
    >say that one that scans holographic anything would be too cost
    >ineffective for the manufacturers and too pricey for consumers as
    >well. Better to have inner hub data that gets read by players, but
    >never get burned in a copy process. They already encode disc ID info
    >there, and that does not get copied when a disc copy is made. no
    >matter how good the copy software is. The laser head doesn't read
    >that area during data reads. A home player could, though, and could
    >use it to ID TRUE discs from a fucking copy.


    Why do you always have to get onto your copying hobbyhorse? This
    discussion had NOTHING to do with security, or copying, or any legal
    matter, just home video formats.

    Holography has been around since the early 60's. It is a technique of
    using interfering light waves to create an image that can't be
    discerned from the source. Two projected images may be mixed to
    create completely new information. For instance a fine random pattern
    may be impressed onto film that when lit by a polarized light source
    and read by a specific polarized lens structure may then create an
    image..


    .Steve ..
    >
    > All you "back it up" retards should learn that the only thing you'll
    >have is VHS or a downconverted VCD form factor at your disposal.
    >Bit for bit copying will be a thing of the past. If that isn't good
    >enough... too fucking bad.
    >
    > GOOD.
     
    Steve(JazzHunter), Mar 7, 2004
    #14
  15. Tom McCafferty

    DarkMatter Guest

    On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 20:19:29 -0500, "Steve(JazzHunter)"
    <> Gave us:

    >On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 12:20:02 -0800, DarkMatter
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 15:01:57 -0500, "Steve(JazzHunter)"
    >><> Gave us:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Yes that's right. I also ded read an article about using holographic
    >>>scrambling on an optical media to get more information in a given
    >>>space and to add error-correction.

    >>
    >> Since optical media readers are currently lineal read devices, I'd
    >>say that one that scans holographic anything would be too cost
    >>ineffective for the manufacturers and too pricey for consumers as
    >>well. Better to have inner hub data that gets read by players, but
    >>never get burned in a copy process. They already encode disc ID info
    >>there, and that does not get copied when a disc copy is made. no
    >>matter how good the copy software is. The laser head doesn't read
    >>that area during data reads. A home player could, though, and could
    >>use it to ID TRUE discs from a fucking copy.

    >
    >Why do you always have to get onto your copying hobbyhorse?


    Fucking retard. What do you think such features are utilized for?


    >This
    >discussion had NOTHING to do with security, or copying, or any legal
    >matter, just home video formats.


    Absolutely untrue. A data disc is filled already. Any overlays are
    no more than a pipe dream in some engineer's head that cost ways too
    much to actually implement.

    >
    >Holography has been around since the early 60's.


    Not in ANY consumer device, dipshit.

    >It is a technique of
    >using interfering light waves to create an image that can't be
    >discerned from the source.


    We don't need a primer, retard boy.

    > Two projected images may be mixed to
    >create completely new information.


    No shit.

    > For instance a fine random pattern
    >may be impressed onto film that when lit by a polarized light source
    >and read by a specific polarized lens structure may then create an
    >image..


    So what? That still doesn't mean that any such system could be
    readily or effectively (cost effectively) incorporated into a consumer
    product.

    Nor does it infer that any such implementation would prove
    beneficial in any way.
    >
    >
    > .Steve .. The ditz.


    snip

    Look, you dumbfuck. The previous post mentioned holographic
    scrambling. If you are too fucking stupid to know what the purpose of
    such a feature is, you should stay the **** out of the discussion.
    One will not get any additional data space on a single layer.
    Additional layers are then required, and that means process problems.

    It's all about cost, and keeping idiots from making illegal bit for
    bit copies.

    If you have never been to the museum of holography in New York City,
    you should go. Right now, your cursory knowledge of the realm
    make for good humor, especially when you make your little educational
    primer attempts.
     
    DarkMatter, Mar 7, 2004
    #15
  16. >RCA, I remember reading at the time, was experimenting with a tape system
    >that was to utilize holographic technology in some way. I believe that was
    >when they first coined the term "Selectavision," some years before CED.


    Actually, the format you are describing was called Holotape. The name
    SelectaVision was used for the line of video experiments they were conducting
    which included Holotape, magnetic videotape, and videodisc. - Reinhart
     
    LASERandDVDfan, Mar 7, 2004
    #16
  17. Tom McCafferty

    Bill Guest


    > Actually, the format you are describing was called Holotape. The name
    > SelectaVision was used for the line of video experiments they were

    conducting
    > which included Holotape, magnetic videotape, and videodisc. - Reinhart


    Thank you! That term came back to me shortly after posting my original
    message earlier today--but, as with any memory that old, I still wasn't
    completely certain.

    Our 12th grade English teacher, in 1972, wanted each of us to write a
    research paper in the spring of that year. Though she hated the subject, she
    was kind enough to allow me to write a paper on the upcoming home video
    revolution. That's when I first read about RCA Holotape, as well as the CBS
    EVR system.

    Bill
     
    Bill, Mar 7, 2004
    #17
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Allan
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    849
    Allan
    Feb 15, 2005
  2. Allan
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    6,063
    Allan
    Jul 15, 2005
  3. Jonathan Walker
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    571
    Peter
    Aug 26, 2007
  4. helena68
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,453
    popularscan
    Nov 26, 2008
  5. windhello
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,862
    cindylili
    Jun 24, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page