The end of quality?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Rich, Jan 13, 2006.

  1. Rich

    Rich Guest

    So iPod casts of movies will replace DVDs, etc?
    Nice to see the y-gens don't care much about overall quality.


    Digital killed the video store

    The livelihood of video stores and online rentals might be numbered,
    now that the video-download movement is underway. The dawn of
    convenient video downloads of movie and television shows follows in
    the steps of audio music and music videos, and more companies are
    jumping on the bandwagon, trying to tap into a chunk of this growing
    industry.

    A number of companies have already introduced video services or new
    technologies that support video download.

    Already, both MovieLink and CinemaNow rent videos online for Windows
    applications only, allowing consumers to download movies for 24-hour
    periods starting anywhere from $1.99 to $3.99. Both services also
    allow some movies to be bought.

    Via iTunes and Apple, consumers can download select TV shows from ABC,
    NBC Universal, USA Network, Disney and the Sci-Fi Channel onto the new
    video iPod for $1.99 per episode.

    And Google just launched an online Google Video Store that would be an
    open "marketplace" for all videos. Content sold would include classic
    cartoons and CBS shows.

    Not to be left out, both TiVo and DIRECT TV announced new to-go
    services that would allow subscribers to transfer recorded shows to a
    number of portable media players including iPods and P2P players with
    TiVo To Go and DirecTV 2Go.

    "With the advent of downloading videos ... there's no worry about
    taking back DVDs to stores, no mail, it's instant," cable network
    Starz' spokesman Tom Southwick told UPI. "It's a much more convenient
    way to access movies than having to deal with the physical deeds."

    Earlier this month Starz Entertainment Group LLC also launched its
    version of a video download service called Vongo, where subscribers
    can download or purchase videos and play them back on Windows-based
    PCs, laptops, portable media devices and TVs.

    Unlike the pay-per-view model, subscription is the basis for Starz,
    which offers more than 1,000 movies as well as live streaming of the
    Starz TV Channel for $9.99 a month as well as pay-per-view movies for
    $3.99.

    In a December 2005 study of 488 Starz subscribers, Starz reported that
    70 percent of users admitted they no longer go to the video store
    while 72 percent said they rent fewer DVDs and 60 percent said they
    bought fewer DVDs.

    With consumer attitudes like these, businesses like Blockbuster that
    have suffered a number of setbacks within the last year alone are
    likely to shift their business model from the conventional "video
    store" concept.

    On Tuesday Blockbuster Chief Executive John Antioco told investors the
    company will try to refocus its clientele less toward retail stores
    and more toward the online service in 2006.

    The push toward online rental comes after the success of online-based
    service Netflix, which dominated the online rental service gaining 4
    million subscribers last year, compared to Blockbuster's only 1
    million.

    Netflix spokesman Steve Swasey told UPI video-rental stores are in
    trouble but said both the video-downloading market and technology is
    still too young.

    "Downloading is more a future vision than a practical reality," said
    Swasey, acknowledging that the service will be popular in the next
    five to 10 years. "And as a future vision, Netflix shares that vision.
    We'll be coming out with downloadable content when the right time
    comes."

    Swasey says the problem with video-download services are their small
    selection of video content and that most consumers still desire DVDs
    -- and that the next big thing is high-definition DVDs.

    "Downloading is really cool, but most Americans are happy with their
    DVD player," he said. "People want to watch DVDs in family rooms, not
    put them onto laptops or handheld devices."

    In fact, the company forecasts it will continue its success,
    estimating 5 million members in 2006 and at least 20 million by 2010
    or 2012, Swasey said.

    But Jeffrey Cole, director of the Center for the Digital Future, sees
    the trend taking place much sooner.

    The center, part of the University of Southern California's Annenberg
    School, released last year a study about the impact of the Internet on
    daily life.

    "I'm one of the few people who believe consumers will want to watch
    longer-form content on smaller screens during downtime, as seen
    already with people surfing the Web and listening to music," he said.

    According to Cole, teens want media that move platform to platform,
    and they are likely to carry on that habit for the rest of their
    lives.

    But he notes that on the other side of the spectrum, people will watch
    shows on plasma, high-definition or flat-screen TVs as they become
    more affordable.

    "It's not a good time to be in the video-rental business, but not a
    bad time to be in online rental, but it's a terrible time to be a
    station owner," Cole said.

    As Cole notes, television stations might be in trouble too, losing
    audiences to video downloads of prime-time shows.

    Despite a future of video downloads, a new wave of piracy might also
    be underway, according to Matthew Tinkcom.

    Tinkcom, a professor with Georgetown's Communication, Culture and
    Technology program, says video downloads will re-enact many of the
    same problems the music industry had to cope with when file-sharing
    became possible.

    "The virtues of digital cultural production are, for the manufacturer,
    also its shortcomings," he said. "Ease of reproduction and fidelity of
    the copy to the original mean that films can be quickly reproduced and
    distributed with no necessary attention to questions of intellectual
    property."

    Moreover, Tinkcom sees the current trend as a "cinematic version of
    Apple's iMusic service, with On Demand services and Pay-Per-View
    brokering the deal between the viewer and the industry." However, he
    says the film industry would be better served if it were to find a
    more "effective interface with consumers such as Web-based forms of
    publicity."

    "The larger problem of global distribution, though, remains, to the
    degree that these techniques don't address the problem of piracy
    outside the U.S.," he said. "This will only become a bigger problem as
    the studios come to rely on non-U.S. box office receipts for revenue,
    and I think that they have their work cut out for them in that
    regard."

    Copyright 2006 by United Press International




    This news is brought to you by PhysOrg.com
    Rich, Jan 13, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Rich

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <>, Rich
    <> wrote:

    > So iPod casts of movies will replace DVDs, etc?
    > Nice to see the y-gens don't care much about overall quality.
    >

    I watched black and white tv off a bad roof antenna in the early 70's,
    so above a certain point picture and sound quality doesn't matter.

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
    Invid Fan, Jan 13, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Rich

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    On Thu, 12 Jan 2006 21:56:34 -0500, Invid Fan <>
    Gave us:

    >In article <>, Rich
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> So iPod casts of movies will replace DVDs, etc?
    >> Nice to see the y-gens don't care much about overall quality.
    >>

    >I watched black and white tv off a bad roof antenna in the early 70's,
    >so above a certain point picture and sound quality doesn't matter.



    Still, in today's modern era of cheap consumer goods, that makes you
    an INVID IDIOT.
    Roy L. Fuchs, Jan 13, 2006
    #3
  4. Rich

    Alpha Guest

    "Rich" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > So iPod casts of movies will replace DVDs, etc?
    > Nice to see the y-gens don't care much about overall quality.
    >
    >
    > Digital killed the video store
    >
    > The livelihood of video stores and online rentals might be numbered,
    > now that the video-download movement is underway. The dawn of
    > convenient video downloads of movie and television shows follows in
    > the steps of audio music and music videos, and more companies are
    > jumping on the bandwagon, trying to tap into a chunk of this growing
    > industry.
    >
    > A number of companies have already introduced video services or new
    > technologies that support video download.
    >
    > Already, both MovieLink and CinemaNow rent videos online for Windows
    > applications only, allowing consumers to download movies for 24-hour
    > periods starting anywhere from $1.99 to $3.99. Both services also
    > allow some movies to be bought.
    >
    > Via iTunes and Apple, consumers can download select TV shows from ABC,
    > NBC Universal, USA Network, Disney and the Sci-Fi Channel onto the new
    > video iPod for $1.99 per episode.
    >
    > And Google just launched an online Google Video Store that would be an
    > open "marketplace" for all videos. Content sold would include classic
    > cartoons and CBS shows.
    >
    > Not to be left out, both TiVo and DIRECT TV announced new to-go
    > services that would allow subscribers to transfer recorded shows to a
    > number of portable media players including iPods and P2P players with
    > TiVo To Go and DirecTV 2Go.
    >
    > "With the advent of downloading videos ... there's no worry about
    > taking back DVDs to stores, no mail, it's instant," cable network
    > Starz' spokesman Tom Southwick told UPI. "It's a much more convenient
    > way to access movies than having to deal with the physical deeds."
    >
    > Earlier this month Starz Entertainment Group LLC also launched its
    > version of a video download service called Vongo, where subscribers
    > can download or purchase videos and play them back on Windows-based
    > PCs, laptops, portable media devices and TVs.
    >
    > Unlike the pay-per-view model, subscription is the basis for Starz,
    > which offers more than 1,000 movies as well as live streaming of the
    > Starz TV Channel for $9.99 a month as well as pay-per-view movies for
    > $3.99.
    >
    > In a December 2005 study of 488 Starz subscribers, Starz reported that
    > 70 percent of users admitted they no longer go to the video store
    > while 72 percent said they rent fewer DVDs and 60 percent said they
    > bought fewer DVDs.
    >
    > With consumer attitudes like these, businesses like Blockbuster that
    > have suffered a number of setbacks within the last year alone are
    > likely to shift their business model from the conventional "video
    > store" concept.
    >
    > On Tuesday Blockbuster Chief Executive John Antioco told investors the
    > company will try to refocus its clientele less toward retail stores
    > and more toward the online service in 2006.
    >
    > The push toward online rental comes after the success of online-based
    > service Netflix, which dominated the online rental service gaining 4
    > million subscribers last year, compared to Blockbuster's only 1
    > million.
    >
    > Netflix spokesman Steve Swasey told UPI video-rental stores are in
    > trouble but said both the video-downloading market and technology is
    > still too young.
    >
    > "Downloading is more a future vision than a practical reality," said
    > Swasey, acknowledging that the service will be popular in the next
    > five to 10 years. "And as a future vision, Netflix shares that vision.
    > We'll be coming out with downloadable content when the right time
    > comes."
    >
    > Swasey says the problem with video-download services are their small
    > selection of video content and that most consumers still desire DVDs
    > -- and that the next big thing is high-definition DVDs.
    >
    > "Downloading is really cool, but most Americans are happy with their
    > DVD player," he said. "People want to watch DVDs in family rooms, not
    > put them onto laptops or handheld devices."



    People want to do both. They want HD at home and much lesser
    portable....for ONE PRICE.
    Alpha, Jan 13, 2006
    #4
  5. Rich

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Rich <> wrote:
    :> So iPod casts of movies will replace DVDs, etc?
    :> Nice to see the y-gens don't care much about overall quality.

    It won't happen, at least not anytime soon.

    I've rented Movielink movies for my laptop. There's no way that will
    replace even a rental DVD that I can keep as long as I want and watch total
    at my lesuire, especially with the limitations that get imposed now (24 h
    viewing time for $4, and a limited timespan to watch).

    It does have its place. When on travel with some dead time, it's an option.
    I've found download times to be a big drawback, though.
    Roger Zoul, Jan 14, 2006
    #5
  6. Rich

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <>, Roy L. Fuchs
    <> wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Jan 2006 21:56:34 -0500, Invid Fan <>
    > Gave us:
    >
    > >In article <>, Rich
    > ><> wrote:
    > >
    > >> So iPod casts of movies will replace DVDs, etc?
    > >> Nice to see the y-gens don't care much about overall quality.
    > >>

    > >I watched black and white tv off a bad roof antenna in the early 70's,
    > >so above a certain point picture and sound quality doesn't matter.

    >
    >
    > Still, in today's modern era of cheap consumer goods, that makes you
    > an INVID IDIOT.


    But it'd be the cheap iPod downloads I'll be satisfied with :)

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
    Invid Fan, Jan 14, 2006
    #6
    1. Advertising

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