The dangers of WiFi

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Shane, Apr 22, 2007.

  1. Shane

    Shane Guest

    I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some knowledgeable
    people (radio) there.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    health.

    Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    secondary schools - have installed it.

    But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and premature
    senility.

    __EOP__

    Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install at
    home.


    --
    Q: What is clear and used by trendy sophisticated engineers to solve other
    differential equations?
    A: The Perrier transform.
     
    Shane, Apr 22, 2007
    #1
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  2. Shane

    Tony Guest

    >
    > __EOP__
    >
    > Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install at
    > home.
    >

    Everyone knows breathing gives you cancer ! be afraid you little jellyfish !
     
    Tony, Apr 22, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Shane

    sam Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some knowledgeable
    > people (radio) there.
    >
    > http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    > Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    > radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    > health.
    >
    > Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    > a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    > telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    > estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    > secondary schools - have installed it.
    >
    > But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and premature
    > senility.
    >
    > __EOP__
    >
    > Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install at
    > home.
    >
    >

    Its less RF power than cellphones or DECT or broadcast.
    Its a bit late to be worrying about radio frequency radiation.
    "You're soaking in it"
     
    sam, Apr 22, 2007
    #3
  4. Shane

    Jack Guest

    "sam" <> wrote in message news:462bcb66$...
    > Shane wrote:
    >> I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    >> knowledgeable
    >> people (radio) there.
    >>
    >> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    >> Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    >> radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    >> health.
    >>
    >> Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    >> a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    >> telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    >> estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    >> secondary schools - have installed it.
    >>
    >> But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    >> premature
    >> senility.
    >>
    >> __EOP__
    >>
    >> Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install
    >> at
    >> home.
    >>
    >>

    > Its less RF power than cellphones or DECT or broadcast.
    > Its a bit late to be worrying about radio frequency radiation.
    > "You're soaking in it"


    The less RF you are exposed to the better, it's probably no coincidence that
    left-handed cell phone users invariably end up with brain tumours on the
    left-hand sides of their brains! And yes, you guessed it, cell phone users
    who put their phones to their right ears, invariably get brain tumours on
    the right sides of their brains. Using the speaker phone on your cell phone
    and keeping the phone as far away from your ears as possible might just be a
    good idea.
     
    Jack, Apr 23, 2007
    #4
  5. Shane

    Fred Guest

    "Shane" <-a-geek.net> wrote in message
    news:f0gdbf$n6l$...
    > I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    > knowledgeable
    > people (radio) there.
    >
    > http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    > Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    > radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    > health.
    >
    > Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    > a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    > telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    > estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    > secondary schools - have installed it.
    >
    > But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    > premature
    > senility.
    >
    > __EOP__
    >
    > Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install
    > at
    > home.
    >
    >


    I've been using wifi for a couple of years, and I'm sure you won't want to
    end up like me!
     
    Fred, Apr 23, 2007
    #5
  6. Shane

    Jack Guest

    "Fred" <> wrote in message
    news:462c29ef$...
    >
    > "Shane" <-a-geek.net> wrote in message
    > news:f0gdbf$n6l$...
    >> I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    >> knowledgeable
    >> people (radio) there.
    >>
    >> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    >> Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    >> radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    >> health.
    >>
    >> Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    >> a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    >> telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    >> estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    >> secondary schools - have installed it.
    >>
    >> But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    >> premature
    >> senility.
    >>
    >> __EOP__
    >>
    >> Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install
    >> at
    >> home.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I've been using wifi for a couple of years, and I'm sure you won't want to
    > end up like me!


    I agree entirely! This topic has already been discussed at length in places
    like this:

    http://paulstamatiou.com/2006/11/25/wi-fi-as-a-health-risk/
     
    Jack, Apr 23, 2007
    #6
  7. Shane

    Sonn Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some knowledgeable
    > people (radio) there.
    >
    > http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    > Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    > radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    > health.
    >
    > Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    > a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    > telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    > estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    > secondary schools - have installed it.
    >
    > But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and premature
    > senility.
    >
    > __EOP__
    >
    > Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install at
    > home.
    >
    >

    Social darwinism. Given that people overall are living longer and the
    population on the planet is exploding at an unsustainable rate, it
    stands to reason that a consequence of such expansion will also be an
    shorter lifespan for some.
    S.
     
    Sonn, Apr 23, 2007
    #7
  8. In <462c17b1$> Jack wrote:
    >
    > "sam" <> wrote in message news:462bcb66$.
    > nz...
    >> Shane wrote:
    >>> I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    >>> knowledgeable
    >>> people (radio) there.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&
    >>> objectid=10435649 Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the
    >>> network, which emits radiation, to be full investigated because of
    >>> the concern for students' health.
    >>>
    >>> Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills
    >>> as a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be
    >>> connected to telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools
    >>> there, with estimates that more than half of primary schools - and
    >>> four-fifths of secondary schools - have installed it.
    >>>
    >>> But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    >>> premature
    >>> senility.
    >>>
    >>> __EOP__
    >>>
    >>> Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi
    >>> install at home.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Its less RF power than cellphones or DECT or broadcast.
    >> Its a bit late to be worrying about radio frequency radiation.
    >> "You're soaking in it"

    >
    > The less RF you are exposed to the better, it's probably no
    > coincidence that left-handed cell phone users invariably end up with
    > brain tumours on the left-hand sides of their brains! And yes, you
    > guessed it, cell phone users who put their phones to their right ears,
    > invariably get brain tumours on the right sides of their brains.


    I think that should read "left-handed cell phone users _who get a brain
    tumour_ invariably end up with brain tumours on the left-hand sides of
    their brains". Which is still not true of course, but I do remember
    reading there may be a statistically significant difference for brain
    tumour side versus cell phone side. Of course since cell phone users
    don't seem to get brain tumours anymore often than non-cell phone users
    maybe it's merely the act of holding your arm up that causes brain
    tumours.

    --
    * Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand -> http://roger.geek.nz
    * PS/2 Mouse Adapter for vintage Apple II or Mac
    * SCART RGB video cable for Apple IIGS
     
    Roger Johnstone, Apr 23, 2007
    #8
  9. Shane

    Jerry Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some knowledgeable
    > people (radio) there.
    >
    > http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    > Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    > radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    > health.
    >
    > Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    > a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    > telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    > estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    > secondary schools - have installed it.
    >
    > But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and premature
    > senility.
    >
    > __EOP__
    >
    > Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install at
    > home.


    Marconi sent and received his first radio signal in 1895 and since then
    man-made radiation has joined natural radiation around the earth. Since
    then life expectancy has greatly increased. If you are really concerned
    about a few microwatts from Wi_Fi when there are huge transmitters
    broadcasting kilowatts on the hill you should really get out more often.
     
    Jerry, Apr 23, 2007
    #9
  10. Shane

    Murray Symon Guest

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2007 14:19:28 +1200, Jack wrote:

    >
    > "sam" <> wrote in message
    > news:462bcb66$...
    >> Shane wrote:
    >>> I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    >>> knowledgeable
    >>> people (radio) there.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    >>> Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    >>> radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    >>> health.
    >>>
    >>> Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    >>> a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    >>> telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    >>> estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    >>> secondary schools - have installed it.
    >>>
    >>> But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    >>> premature
    >>> senility.
    >>>
    >>> __EOP__
    >>>
    >>> Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi
    >>> install at
    >>> home.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Its less RF power than cellphones or DECT or broadcast. Its a bit late
    >> to be worrying about radio frequency radiation. "You're soaking in it"

    >
    > The less RF you are exposed to the better, it's probably no coincidence
    > that left-handed cell phone users invariably end up with brain tumours on
    > the left-hand sides of their brains! And yes, you guessed it, cell phone
    > users who put their phones to their right ears, invariably get brain
    > tumours on the right sides of their brains. Using the speaker phone on
    > your cell phone and keeping the phone as far away from your ears as
    > possible might just be a good idea.



    Do you really want everybody holding their cellphones at arm's length
    and SHOUTING at them? I don't think so!
     
    Murray Symon, Apr 23, 2007
    #10
  11. Shane

    Rob Guest

    "Shane" <-a-geek.net> wrote in message
    news:f0gdbf$n6l$...
    > I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    > knowledgeable
    > people (radio) there.
    >
    > http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    > Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    > radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    > health.
    >
    > Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    > a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    > telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    > estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    > secondary schools - have installed it.
    >
    > But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    > premature
    > senility.
    >
    > __EOP__
    >
    > Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install
    > at
    > home.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Q: What is clear and used by trendy sophisticated engineers to solve other
    > differential equations?
    > A: The Perrier transform.
    >


    Don't computers themselves emit radiation anyway. They also offgas harmful
    chemicals. You do have to live your life, and not be too concerned,
    otherwise you would become a bubbleboy.
     
    Rob, Apr 23, 2007
    #11
  12. Shane

    Roger_Nickel Guest

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2007 14:19:28 +1200, Jack wrote:


    > "sam" <> wrote in message
    > news:462bcb66$...
    >> Shane wrote:
    >>> I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    >>> knowledgeable
    >>> people (radio) there.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    >>> Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which
    >>> emits radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for
    >>> students' health.
    >>>
    >>> Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    >>> a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    >>> telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    >>> estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    >>> secondary schools - have installed it.
    >>>
    >>> But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    >>> premature
    >>> senility.
    >>>
    >>> __EOP__
    >>>
    >>> Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi
    >>> install at
    >>> home.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Its less RF power than cellphones or DECT or broadcast. Its a bit late
    >> to be worrying about radio frequency radiation. "You're soaking in it"

    >
    > The less RF you are exposed to the better, it's probably no coincidence
    > that left-handed cell phone users invariably end up with brain tumours
    > on the left-hand sides of their brains! And yes, you guessed it, cell
    > phone users who put their phones to their right ears, invariably get
    > brain tumours on the right sides of their brains. Using the speaker
    > phone on your cell phone and keeping the phone as far away from your
    > ears as possible might just be a good idea.


    "Invariably" is a bit strong. There is a correlation which can be dug out
    of the noise by using statistical methods on a huge sample is all. Modern
    cell phones are only operating at 100 milliwatts or so because of higher
    cell density and problems will be less than in the days when phones
    sometimes pumped out several watts to maintain a connection. Prudent
    behaviour is a good idea; use an external aerial in the car and in other
    difficult environments if you will be using the phone a lot there. Wi-fi
    is legally limited to 1 watt Equivalent Radiated Power and commercial
    units usually radiate 100mW or less. The inverse square law applies to a
    first approximation so this is much less of a concern than the cell phone
    held against the head. Wi-fi signals are almost at background levels and
    spread spectrum and frequency hopping techniques rather than raw power are
    used to achieve communication so I am not at all worried about wi-fi.
     
    Roger_Nickel, Apr 23, 2007
    #12
  13. Shane

    Richard Guest

    sam wrote:

    > Its less RF power than cellphones or DECT or broadcast.
    > Its a bit late to be worrying about radio frequency radiation.
    > "You're soaking in it"


    definatly more then dect since that is so useless that it cant even
    cover a house and has a much lower datarate.
     
    Richard, Apr 23, 2007
    #13
  14. Shane

    bAZZ Guest

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2007 15:33:21 +1200, Fred <> wrote:

    >
    > "Shane" <-a-geek.net> wrote in message
    > news:f0gdbf$n6l$...
    >> I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    >> knowledgeable
    >> people (radio) there.
    >>
    >> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    >> Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    >> radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    >> health.
    >>
    >> Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    >> a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    >> telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    >> estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    >> secondary schools - have installed it.
    >>
    >> But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    >> premature
    >> senility.
    >>
    >> __EOP__
    >>
    >> Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi
    >> install
    >> at
    >> home.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I've been using wifi for a couple of years, and I'm sure you won't want
    > to
    > end up like me!
    >
    >


    Hell, I don't even use it and look at the state I'm in :)
    I'll be right tho if I switch to Linux LOL.

    Shit, I'm being silly tonite.

    bAzz

    --
    Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
     
    bAZZ, Apr 23, 2007
    #14
  15. Shane

    sam Guest

    Richard wrote:
    > sam wrote:
    >
    >> Its less RF power than cellphones or DECT or broadcast.
    >> Its a bit late to be worrying about radio frequency radiation.
    >> "You're soaking in it"

    >
    > definatly more then dect since that is so useless that it cant even
    > cover a house and has a much lower datarate.


    The level next to your head is higher though.
     
    sam, Apr 24, 2007
    #15
  16. Shane

    sam Guest

    Jack wrote:
    > "sam" <> wrote in message news:462bcb66$...
    >> Shane wrote:
    >>> I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    >>> knowledgeable
    >>> people (radio) there.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    >>> Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    >>> radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    >>> health.
    >>>
    >>> Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    >>> a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    >>> telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    >>> estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    >>> secondary schools - have installed it.
    >>>
    >>> But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    >>> premature
    >>> senility.
    >>>
    >>> __EOP__
    >>>
    >>> Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install
    >>> at
    >>> home.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Its less RF power than cellphones or DECT or broadcast.
    >> Its a bit late to be worrying about radio frequency radiation.
    >> "You're soaking in it"

    >
    > The less RF you are exposed to the better, it's probably no coincidence that
    > left-handed cell phone users invariably end up with brain tumours on the
    > left-hand sides of their brains! And yes, you guessed it, cell phone users
    > who put their phones to their right ears, invariably get brain tumours on
    > the right sides of their brains. Using the speaker phone on your cell phone
    > and keeping the phone as far away from your ears as possible might just be a
    > good idea.
    >
    >

    But the topic is wi-fi not cellphones.
    Which side of your head do you use for your laptop ?
     
    sam, Apr 24, 2007
    #16
  17. Shane

    Jack Guest

    "Jerry" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Shane wrote:
    >> I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    >> knowledgeable
    >> people (radio) there.
    >>
    >> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    >> Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    >> radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    >> health.
    >>
    >> Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    >> a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    >> telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    >> estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    >> secondary schools - have installed it.
    >>
    >> But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    >> premature
    >> senility.
    >>
    >> __EOP__
    >>
    >> Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install
    >> at
    >> home.

    >
    > Marconi sent and received his first radio signal in 1895 and since then
    > man-made radiation has joined natural radiation around the earth. Since
    > then life expectancy has greatly increased. If you are really concerned
    > about a few microwatts from Wi_Fi when there are huge transmitters
    > broadcasting kilowatts on the hill you should really get out more often.


    I think that people whose homes are very close to large power pylons have
    also been shown to be more at risk from radiation problems than people who
    live a long way from such pylons. People have often complained when powerful
    radio transmitters are built near to their homes or when cell phone base
    towers are built near schools etc. It is a bit foolish to dismiss the
    effects of RF on your health, particularly if you are a younger person whose
    brain is still growing and developing. Cancerous tumors can be caused by
    radiation, that's why they stopped x-raying peoples' feet when they were
    buying shoes. I agree with people who say that you shouldn't over emphasise
    the problem, but then, like anything, it pays to know that you may be taking
    risks with your health if you are continually exposed to high levels of
    radiation, such as living near a power pylon.
     
    Jack, Apr 24, 2007
    #17
  18. Shane

    El Chippy Guest

    On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 13:53:17 +1200, Robert Singers wrote:

    > Between saving the world and having a spot of tea Shane said
    >
    >> Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi
    >> install at home.

    >
    > Sure. Make sure you also get rid of your mobile phone, cordless phone, and
    > microwave too.
    >


    And you might want to reconsider keeping your car keys with the alarm
    transmitter in your front pocket too. :)
     
    El Chippy, Apr 24, 2007
    #18
  19. Shane

    sam Guest

    Jack wrote:
    > "Jerry" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Shane wrote:
    >>> I've crossposted this to nz.tech because I know there are some
    >>> knowledgeable
    >>> people (radio) there.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10435649
    >>> Britain's top health-protection watchdog wants the network, which emits
    >>> radiation, to be full investigated because of the concern for students'
    >>> health.
    >>>
    >>> Wi-Fi - described by the British Department of Education and Skills as
    >>> a "magical" system that means computers do not have to be connected to
    >>> telephone lines - is being taken up rapidly in schools there, with
    >>> estimates that more than half of primary schools - and four-fifths of
    >>> secondary schools - have installed it.
    >>>
    >>> But some scientists have expressed fears it could cause cancer and
    >>> premature
    >>> senility.
    >>>
    >>> __EOP__
    >>>
    >>> Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi install
    >>> at
    >>> home.

    >> Marconi sent and received his first radio signal in 1895 and since then
    >> man-made radiation has joined natural radiation around the earth. Since
    >> then life expectancy has greatly increased. If you are really concerned
    >> about a few microwatts from Wi_Fi when there are huge transmitters
    >> broadcasting kilowatts on the hill you should really get out more often.

    >
    > I think that people whose homes are very close to large power pylons have
    > also been shown to be more at risk from radiation problems than people who
    > live a long way from such pylons. People have often complained when powerful
    > radio transmitters are built near to their homes or when cell phone base
    > towers are built near schools etc. It is a bit foolish to dismiss the
    > effects of RF on your health, particularly if you are a younger person whose
    > brain is still growing and developing. Cancerous tumors can be caused by
    > radiation, that's why they stopped x-raying peoples' feet when they were
    > buying shoes. I agree with people who say that you shouldn't over emphasise
    > the problem, but then, like anything, it pays to know that you may be taking
    > risks with your health if you are continually exposed to high levels of
    > radiation, such as living near a power pylon.
    >
    >

    Or sleeping on an electric blanket.
     
    sam, Apr 24, 2007
    #19
  20. Between saving the world and having a spot of tea Shane said

    > Kind of makes me wonder if I should go ahead with my planned wifi
    > install at home.


    Sure. Make sure you also get rid of your mobile phone, cordless phone, and
    microwave too.

    --
    rob singers
    pull finger to reply
    Foemina Erit Ruina Tua
     
    Robert Singers, Apr 24, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

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