The 64bit Question

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Tony McKee, Apr 11, 2006.

  1. Tony McKee

    Tony McKee Guest

    Hulloo Folks,

    As I understand it, WinXP Pro (64bit) will run most 32bit software apps just
    fine; but peripheral hardware - particularly PCI I/O cards - *must* have
    64bit drivers. Is that right?

    Reason for asking: I'm contemplating a new Intel rig based on the Abit
    AW8-MAX mobo w/ 955x chipset. I'm thinking of loading the WinXP Pro (64bit)
    OS on it but I need to keep hold of some older SCSI devices
    (Jaz/Zip/Scanner) which currently are attached to a BusLogic FlashPoint PCI
    adapter on this old HP Pavilion. The SCSI adapter and devices work perfectly
    on this machine.

    Since I've had no luck tracking down a 64bit BusLogic FlashPoint driver, I
    fear I'll either have to:

    a) forego 'transplanting' the current SCSI arrangement to the new machine,
    or
    b) fork out for a SCSI adapter whose driver is 64bit, or
    c) drop back to WinXP - for which there exists a BusLogic FlashPoint driver

    Anyone out there running WinXP Pro (64bit) - is there a Buslogic FlashPoint
    file in that OS's driverbase?


    Cheers, Tony McKee

    --

    ---
    I am a part of all that I have met... yet all experience is but an arch
    Wherethro' gleams that untravel'd world whose margins fade
    Forever and forever... 'ere I move.

    ===-- Ulysses --===
    Tony McKee, Apr 11, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Tony McKee wrote:
    > Hulloo Folks,
    >
    > As I understand it, WinXP Pro (64bit) will run most 32bit software apps just
    > fine; but peripheral hardware - particularly PCI I/O cards - *must* have
    > 64bit drivers. Is that right?


    microsoft.public.windows.64bit.general
    Mike Williams, Apr 11, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Tony McKee

    roman modic Guest

    Hello!

    "Tony McKee" <> wrote in message news:QYK_f.12443$...
    > Hulloo Folks,
    >
    > As I understand it, WinXP Pro (64bit) will run most 32bit software apps just
    > fine; but peripheral hardware - particularly PCI I/O cards - *must* have
    > 64bit drivers. Is that right?
    >
    > Reason for asking: I'm contemplating a new Intel rig based on the Abit
    > AW8-MAX mobo w/ 955x chipset. I'm thinking of loading the WinXP Pro (64bit)
    > OS on it but I need to keep hold of some older SCSI devices
    > (Jaz/Zip/Scanner) which currently are attached to a BusLogic FlashPoint PCI
    > adapter on this old HP Pavilion. The SCSI adapter and devices work perfectly
    > on this machine.


    How much memory will this workstation have. What will be its role - what applications
    will be running on it?
    If possible I recommend you to wait for 64-bit Windows Vista.

    Regards, Roman
    roman modic, Apr 11, 2006
    #3
  4. Tony McKee

    Tony McKee Guest

    "roman modic" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello!
    >
    > "Tony McKee" <> wrote in message

    news:QYK_f.12443$...
    > > Hulloo Folks,
    > >
    > > As I understand it, WinXP Pro (64bit) will run most 32bit software apps

    just
    > > fine; but peripheral hardware - particularly PCI I/O cards - *must*

    have
    > > 64bit drivers. Is that right?
    > >
    > > Reason for asking: I'm contemplating a new Intel rig based on the Abit
    > > AW8-MAX mobo w/ 955x chipset. I'm thinking of loading the WinXP Pro

    (64bit)
    > > OS on it but I need to keep hold of some older SCSI devices
    > > (Jaz/Zip/Scanner) which currently are attached to a BusLogic FlashPoint

    PCI
    > > adapter on this old HP Pavilion. The SCSI adapter and devices work

    perfectly
    > > on this machine.

    >
    > How much memory will this workstation have. What will be its role - what

    applications
    > will be running on it?
    > If possible I recommend you to wait for 64-bit Windows Vista.


    Yo, Roman.

    Yup, I could wait for Vista - and grow a long white beard during the usual
    18 months or so after initial release before they iron out the inevitable
    bugs. Sigh... ;-)

    Memory will be 1Gb - to begin with anyway. Probably those Corsair TwinX dual
    channel ones with the pretty lights! ;-)

    Apps will be all the usual stuff associated with a household/small bizz PC -
    but I want to do a lot of graphical/3D art work and video editing, and also
    use it as a base for a modest home sound-recording studio (nothing too
    fancy - just record some guitar with vocals, etc). Some networking will be
    involved too - both local and via internet. I would consider any reliable
    applications - esp. 64bit editions - that will get me there. Of course,
    that's assuming I go with WinXP Pro (64bit) - or Vista.

    A modest SATA RAID array would be handy in regard to data security.

    However, the apps can wait a few months. Right now, I just want to get the
    hardware/OS side sorted.

    Couldn't give a toss about games or overclocking - hence not concerned with
    SLI nor Crossfire. Just want a powerful, fast and relatively quiet
    workhorse - and one with shiny new '64bit hooves' would be nice.


    Cheers, Tony McKee

    --

    ---
    I am a part of all that I have met... yet all experience is but an arch
    Wherethro' gleams that untravel'd world whose margins fade
    Forever and forever... 'ere I move.

    ===-- Ulysses --===
    Tony McKee, Apr 11, 2006
    #4
  5. On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 21:48:42 +1200, someone purporting to be Tony McKee
    didst scrawl:

    *SNIP*
    > Reason for asking: I'm contemplating a new Intel rig based on the Abit
    > AW8-MAX mobo w/ 955x chipset.

    *SNIP*

    Gotta ask, WHY Intel?! Do you like heating your home with your computer,
    and adding extra zeroes to the bonuses of electricity company executives?

    Seriously, there is nothing that Intel can offer right now, wrt 64-bit,
    that AMD doesn't have beaten in spades. Core is still a dream
    specification, and you're after a right-here, right-now construction.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
    Matthew Poole, Apr 11, 2006
    #5
  6. Tony McKee

    Enkidu Guest

    Tony McKee wrote:
    > Hulloo Folks,
    >
    > As I understand it, WinXP Pro (64bit) will run most 32bit software apps just
    > fine; but peripheral hardware - particularly PCI I/O cards - *must* have
    > 64bit drivers. Is that right?
    >
    > Reason for asking: I'm contemplating a new Intel rig based on the Abit
    > AW8-MAX mobo w/ 955x chipset. I'm thinking of loading the WinXP Pro (64bit)
    > OS on it but I need to keep hold of some older SCSI devices
    > (Jaz/Zip/Scanner) which currently are attached to a BusLogic FlashPoint PCI
    > adapter on this old HP Pavilion. The SCSI adapter and devices work perfectly
    > on this machine.
    >
    > Since I've had no luck tracking down a 64bit BusLogic FlashPoint driver, I
    > fear I'll either have to:
    >
    > a) forego 'transplanting' the current SCSI arrangement to the new machine,
    > or
    > b) fork out for a SCSI adapter whose driver is 64bit, or
    > c) drop back to WinXP - for which there exists a BusLogic FlashPoint driver
    >
    > Anyone out there running WinXP Pro (64bit) - is there a Buslogic FlashPoint
    > file in that OS's driverbase?
    >

    That's not a yes/no question. The OS wraps a 64bit, erm, wrapper around
    stuff that has to use 32bit code. Consequently *some* software might
    work OK, and other fussier stuff might not. I'd suspect that drivers as
    such would be fussy, but a 32 bit card only understands 32 bit commands
    so a 32 bit driver might work. However the driver ini files might
    specify the particular version the driver for a particular OS, and the
    64 bit OS won't be in the ini and it will not install. You might be able
    to install a driver by hand, if you are adventurous enough.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    Enkidu, Apr 11, 2006
    #6
  7. Tony McKee

    Steven H Guest

    Hello Enkidu,

    > That's not a yes/no question. The OS wraps a 64bit, erm, wrapper
    > around stuff that has to use 32bit code. Consequently *some* software
    > might work OK, and other fussier stuff might not.


    as a general rule, what runs in user-land will be executed within something
    called 'Windows on Windows 32' thus providing 32bit emulation. however stuff
    that runs in kernal-land (drivers) MUST be compiled for 64bit architectures.

    however, this goes out the door if you install a 32bit version of XP on that
    64bit box. if you do this (IIRC only the AMD64 chip can do this) everything
    will be 32bit.

    in fact that could be a solution for you, if you dont want to wait untill
    vista and dont *need* a 64bit OS just yet you could save your pennies towards
    vista and use 32bit XP in the interrum.

    the reason i am sudgesting this is because in Vista the 'sound stack' has
    been re-written (yes from the ground up), the quality is far better (try
    playing two sounds sampled at diffrent rates at the same time and you will
    know what i mean), and your sound editing software could plug into the new
    high fedideality [sic] sound engine - basically Vista will let software write
    directly to the sound card DAC bypassing all the fancy-pants (delaying) stuff
    that could happen to it on the way down to the metal.

    plus all (well all but the bare bones) the sound stuff has been taken out
    of the Kernal and now lives in user-space so you dont get the perf-hit of
    data going through user-kernal modes untill the sound is going to hit the
    metal.

    ----------------
    Steven H

    the madGeek
    Steven H, Apr 11, 2006
    #7
  8. Tony McKee wrote:
    > Hulloo Folks,
    >
    > As I understand it, WinXP Pro (64bit) will run most 32bit software apps just
    > fine; but peripheral hardware - particularly PCI I/O cards - *must* have
    > 64bit drivers. Is that right?
    >



    Yes, that's correct. Most 32-bit applications will work just fine,
    although those that still have 16-bit installers won't even install, and
    because many anti-virus applications use the equivalent of drivers, you
    may need to find another AV solution. All hardware components *must*
    have 64-bit drivers.


    > Reason for asking: I'm contemplating a new Intel rig based on the Abit
    > AW8-MAX mobo w/ 955x chipset. I'm thinking of loading the WinXP Pro (64bit)
    > OS on it but I need to keep hold of some older SCSI devices
    > (Jaz/Zip/Scanner) which currently are attached to a BusLogic FlashPoint PCI
    > adapter on this old HP Pavilion. The SCSI adapter and devices work perfectly
    > on this machine.
    >
    > Since I've had no luck tracking down a 64bit BusLogic FlashPoint driver, I
    > fear I'll either have to:
    >
    > a) forego 'transplanting' the current SCSI arrangement to the new machine,
    > or
    > b) fork out for a SCSI adapter whose driver is 64bit, or
    > c) drop back to WinXP - for which there exists a BusLogic FlashPoint driver
    >
    > Anyone out there running WinXP Pro (64bit) - is there a Buslogic FlashPoint
    > file in that OS's driverbase?
    >
    >


    Sorry, bad news, I think. The only SCSI controller that seems to be
    included with the OS is something by Compaq. I guess no other
    manufacturers bothered to provide Microsoft with any drivers for inclusion.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -Benjamin Franklin
    Bruce Chambers, Apr 12, 2006
    #8
  9. Tony McKee

    Tony McKee Guest

    "Bruce Chambers" <3t> wrote in message
    news:%...

    > Tony McKee wrote:


    > > Anyone out there running WinXP Pro (64bit) - is there a Buslogic

    FlashPoint
    > > file in that OS's driverbase?
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Sorry, bad news, I think. The only SCSI controller that seems to be
    > included with the OS is something by Compaq. I guess no other
    > manufacturers bothered to provide Microsoft with any drivers for

    inclusion.

    Thanks for taking a look'see.

    I'll put WinXP (standard) on the new rig for now, and when Vista is within
    reach of my chubby wee paws, ditch all the 32bit legacy peripherals at the
    knacker's yard, and thus significantly enlightened, bravely soar into the
    64bit promised land! ;-)


    Cheers, Tony McKee

    --

    ---
    I am a part of all that I have met... yet all experience is but an arch
    Wherethro' gleams that untravel'd world whose margins fade
    Forever and forever... 'ere I move.

    ===-- Ulysses --===
    Tony McKee, Apr 12, 2006
    #9
  10. On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 21:48:42 +1200, Tony McKee wrote:

    > Since I've had no luck tracking down a 64bit BusLogic FlashPoint driver, I
    > fear I'll either have to:
    >
    > a) forego 'transplanting' the current SCSI arrangement to the new machine,
    > or
    > b) fork out for a SCSI adapter whose driver is 64bit, or
    > c) drop back to WinXP - for which there exists a BusLogic FlashPoint driver
    >
    > Anyone out there running WinXP Pro (64bit) - is there a Buslogic FlashPoint
    > file in that OS's driverbase?


    Or you could install a 64bit OS that DOES work on that hardware and DOES
    run both 64bit AND 32bit programmes, and automatically detects
    your hardware and installs the necessary drivers. And each revision of the
    distribution also updates the collection of drivers, and for which a huge
    collection of native 64bit programmes already exists.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    "Only one thing is impossible for a Vorlon to understand:
    How to change the IRQ setting in any DOS computer."
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 12, 2006
    #10
  11. Tony McKee

    Tony McKee Guest

    "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <> wrote in message
    news:p...

    > On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 21:48:42 +1200, Tony McKee wrote:


    > Or you could install a 64bit OS that DOES work on that hardware and DOES
    > run both 64bit AND 32bit programmes, and automatically detects
    > your hardware and installs the necessary drivers. And each revision of the
    > distribution also updates the collection of drivers, and for which a huge
    > collection of native 64bit programmes already exists.


    Ahhhh.... you've been puffing a certain herb and gazing at your crystal
    ball... let me see... Vista Ultimate 2025, w/SP 8.75a?

    Or does the Muse point to the Linux Galaxy?

    Okee-dokee. I'll nibble: Pray tell, Squire, what be this Holy Grail of which
    thy speak; and upon which planet might this 'OS el Dorado' be found? Many a
    weary sailor marooned on the digital seas be hanging their last dog-breaths
    upon thy reply! ;-)


    Cheers, Tony McKee

    --

    ---
    I am a part of all that I have met... yet all experience is but an arch
    Wherethro' gleams that untravel'd world whose margins fade
    Forever and forever... 'ere I move.

    ===-- Ulysses --===
    Tony McKee, Apr 12, 2006
    #11
  12. Tony McKee

    Tony McKee Guest

    "Matthew Poole" <> wrote in message
    news:p...

    > On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 21:48:42 +1200, someone purporting to be Tony McKee
    > didst scrawl:
    >
    > *SNIP*
    > > Reason for asking: I'm contemplating a new Intel rig based on the Abit
    > > AW8-MAX mobo w/ 955x chipset.

    > *SNIP*
    >
    > Gotta ask, WHY Intel?! Do you like heating your home with your computer,
    > and adding extra zeroes to the bonuses of electricity company executives?
    >
    > Seriously, there is nothing that Intel can offer right now, wrt 64-bit,
    > that AMD doesn't have beaten in spades. Core is still a dream
    > specification, and you're after a right-here, right-now construction.


    Hulloo, Mat.

    I didn't want to get into one of these AMD vs Intel situations, but, er,
    well, y'see... I am thinking of building *two* rigs - the Intel based one
    now, and an AMD beastie later on. All rather 'Hush - Hush' old boy. Wifey
    thinks I'm building just the one rig. It's been difficult e'nuff embezzling
    the dosh from the household piggy-bank for the first one. I'll say the AMD
    rig is for her - paint the keyboard pink with little blue flowers or
    something... that'll bring her round.

    Just curious... lie back... now count slowly down from 10... you are getting
    sleeeeeepeeeee... subconscious insight slowly takes control of your
    ontological functions.

    Imagine:

    You have a budget of $NZ 3,500 to spend on a DIY rig.

    Up to **$NZ 1000** of that 3.5K budget could be spent on the mobo and CPU -
    the bedrock basics of any system.

    Gaming and overclocking are way down your priority list - even though ye may
    be hung as heretic for openly saying so.

    You still require a fast, powerful workhorse that will do graphical/3D work,
    video editing, act as hub for a potential home recording studio, and, of
    course, perform all the usual computing tasks that we nowadays take for
    granted.

    In addition to the usual USB ports, you require a mix of PCI and PCI-e,
    SATA, ATA, RAID, Firewire ('a' or 'b' but 'b' would be better), Audio, and
    LAN capability.

    Which **64bit capable AMD CPU/Mobo combo (ATX)** would you choose from here:

    www.ascent.co.nz

    Of course, should you decide to undertake this mission, in the presence of
    'wifey' I will vehemently deny any knowledge of your actions. This post
    never existed! ;-)


    Cheers, Tony McKee

    --

    ---
    I am a part of all that I have met... yet all experience is but an arch
    Wherethro' gleams that untravel'd world whose margins fade
    Forever and forever... 'ere I move.

    ===-- Ulysses --===
    Tony McKee, Apr 12, 2006
    #12
  13. On Wed, 12 Apr 2006 22:50:13 +1200, Tony McKee wrote:

    > "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >
    >> On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 21:48:42 +1200, Tony McKee wrote:

    >
    >> Or you could install a 64bit OS that DOES work on that hardware and DOES
    >> run both 64bit AND 32bit programmes, and automatically detects
    >> your hardware and installs the necessary drivers. And each revision of the
    >> distribution also updates the collection of drivers, and for which a huge
    >> collection of native 64bit programmes already exists.

    >
    > Ahhhh.... you've been puffing a certain herb and gazing at your crystal
    > ball... let me see... Vista Ultimate 2025, w/SP 8.75a?
    >
    > Or does the Muse point to the Linux Galaxy?
    >
    > Okee-dokee. I'll nibble: Pray tell, Squire, what be this Holy Grail of which
    > thy speak; and upon which planet might this 'OS el Dorado' be found? Many a
    > weary sailor marooned on the digital seas be hanging their last dog-breaths
    > upon thy reply! ;-)


    Isn't Linux still the only 64bit OS that actually has plenty of
    programmes available that runs natively on it? :eek:)


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    "Only one thing is impossible for a Vorlon to understand:
    How to change the IRQ setting in any DOS computer."
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 12, 2006
    #13
  14. Tony McKee

    Malcolm Guest

    Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:

    > On Wed, 12 Apr 2006 22:50:13 +1200, Tony McKee wrote:
    >
    >> "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <> wrote in message
    >> news:p...
    >>
    >>> On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 21:48:42 +1200, Tony McKee wrote:

    >>
    >>> Or you could install a 64bit OS that DOES work on that hardware
    >>> and DOES run both 64bit AND 32bit programmes, and automatically
    >>> detects your hardware and installs the necessary drivers. And each
    >>> revision of the distribution also updates the collection of
    >>> drivers, and for which a huge collection of native 64bit
    >>> programmes already exists.

    >>
    >> Ahhhh.... you've been puffing a certain herb and gazing at your
    >> crystal ball... let me see... Vista Ultimate 2025, w/SP 8.75a?
    >>
    >> Or does the Muse point to the Linux Galaxy?
    >>
    >> Okee-dokee. I'll nibble: Pray tell, Squire, what be this Holy Grail
    >> of which thy speak; and upon which planet might this 'OS el Dorado'
    >> be found? Many a weary sailor marooned on the digital seas be
    >> hanging their last dog-breaths upon thy reply! ;-)

    >
    > Isn't Linux still the only 64bit OS that actually has plenty of
    > programmes available that runs natively on it? :eek:)
    >
    >
    > Have A Nice Cup of Tea
    >

    Don't forget about Solaris ;-)

    --
    Cheers
    Malcolm °¿°
    Malcolm, Apr 12, 2006
    #14
  15. Tony McKee

    Nik Coughlin Guest

    Tony McKee wrote:
    > Hulloo Folks,
    >
    > As I understand it, WinXP Pro (64bit) will run most 32bit software
    > apps just fine; but peripheral hardware - particularly PCI I/O cards
    > - *must* have 64bit drivers. Is that right?


    I have a dual boot system with XP and XP64. I also sometimes run XP in a
    virtual machine under XP64. I set it up like that because I wanted to use
    64 as my main OS but I wanted the security of being able to run anything.
    That said, I almost never drop into the virtual machine and I've only booted
    into ordinary 64 a handful of times.
    Nik Coughlin, Apr 12, 2006
    #15
  16. Tony McKee

    MarkH Guest

    "Tony McKee" <> wrote in
    news:Hh6%f.12727$:

    > Imagine:
    >
    > You have a budget of $NZ 3,500 to spend on a DIY rig.
    >
    > Up to **$NZ 1000** of that 3.5K budget could be spent on the mobo and
    > CPU - the bedrock basics of any system.
    >
    > Gaming and overclocking are way down your priority list - even though
    > ye may be hung as heretic for openly saying so.
    >
    > You still require a fast, powerful workhorse that will do graphical/3D
    > work, video editing, act as hub for a potential home recording studio,
    > and, of course, perform all the usual computing tasks that we nowadays
    > take for granted.
    >
    > In addition to the usual USB ports, you require a mix of PCI and
    > PCI-e, SATA, ATA, RAID, Firewire ('a' or 'b' but 'b' would be better),
    > Audio, and LAN capability.
    >
    > Which **64bit capable AMD CPU/Mobo combo (ATX)** would you choose from
    > here:
    >
    > www.ascent.co.nz


    http://www.ascent.co.nz/ProductSpecification.aspx?ItemID=342509


    If I was building a $3.5K system (which I did a few weeks ago) then I
    would go for the AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400 Dual Core CPU (which I did a few
    weeks ago).


    Let me get the invoice *rummage*

    AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400+ Dual-Core
    Asus A8N-SLI (10xUSB2, Firewire, 4xSATA, 2xPATA, RAID, PCI-E, 5.1 Audio,
    GB LAN)
    2 x Hynix DDR400 1024MB PC3200 16C Grade RAM
    Nvidia 7900GB 256MB PCI-E DDR3 Dual DVI HDT TV-OUT
    Cooler Master Centurion 5 Case
    AcBel 550W PSU
    2 x Seagate 300GB SATA2 16MB Cache 7200RPM HDD

    That was under $3K incl GST, at the price I paid I could add a 19" LCD +
    Logitech Laser mouse and still keep it under $3.5K. Anyway, I would
    thoroughly recommend everything I listed.




    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 5-September-05)
    "The person on the other side was a young woman. Very obviously a
    young woman. There was no possible way she could have been mistaken
    for a young man in any language, especially Braille."
    Maskerade
    MarkH, Apr 13, 2006
    #16
  17. On Thu, 13 Apr 2006 00:21:05 +1200, someone purporting to be Tony McKee
    didst scrawl:

    > "Matthew Poole" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...

    *SNIP*
    > I didn't want to get into one of these AMD vs Intel situations, but, er,


    Oh, please, you knew it was coming.

    > well, y'see... I am thinking of building *two* rigs - the Intel based one
    > now, and an AMD beastie later on. All rather 'Hush - Hush' old boy. Wifey
    > thinks I'm building just the one rig. It's been difficult e'nuff embezzling


    Ah. I see. I didn't realise that you had to contend with a household
    comptroller :p

    > the dosh from the household piggy-bank for the first one. I'll say the AMD
    > rig is for her - paint the keyboard pink with little blue flowers or
    > something... that'll bring her round.
    >

    Surely there's a shop out there, catering to Asian students, that sells
    them pre-painted?

    > Just curious... lie back... now count slowly down from 10... you are getting
    > sleeeeeepeeeee... subconscious insight slowly takes control of your
    > ontological functions.
    >
    > Imagine:
    >
    > You have a budget of $NZ 3,500 to spend on a DIY rig.
    >
    > Up to **$NZ 1000** of that 3.5K budget could be spent on the mobo and CPU -
    > the bedrock basics of any system.
    >
    > Gaming and overclocking are way down your priority list - even though ye may
    > be hung as heretic for openly saying so.
    >
    > You still require a fast, powerful workhorse that will do graphical/3D work,
    > video editing, act as hub for a potential home recording studio, and, of
    > course, perform all the usual computing tasks that we nowadays take for
    > granted.
    >
    > In addition to the usual USB ports, you require a mix of PCI and PCI-e,
    > SATA, ATA, RAID, Firewire ('a' or 'b' but 'b' would be better), Audio, and
    > LAN capability.
    >
    > Which **64bit capable AMD CPU/Mobo combo (ATX)** would you choose from here:
    >

    *SNIP*

    OK, I'm making a few assumptions.
    1) You're asking for 1394 (good man, USB2 is an evil, evil hack), so you
    don't care too much about the number of USB headers.
    2) You don't give a flying fruitcake about SLI.
    3) Four SATA2 connectors is sufficient.

    On that basis,
    http://www.ascent.co.nz/ProductSpecification.aspx?ItemID=345333 is more
    than adequate. It's got support for three 1394b ports, which I would call
    a totally acceptable trade-off on only having six USB2 ports.

    For a CPU, I'd be looking at an X2 4200+, which is the 2.2GHz dual-core.
    Those two together take care of your $1k limitation, with a tiny bit of
    change.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
    Matthew Poole, Apr 13, 2006
    #17
  18. Tony McKee

    Jerry Guest

    MarkH wrote:
    > "Tony McKee" <> wrote in
    > news:Hh6%f.12727$:
    >
    >
    >>Imagine:
    >>
    >>You have a budget of $NZ 3,500 to spend on a DIY rig.
    >>
    >>Up to **$NZ 1000** of that 3.5K budget could be spent on the mobo and
    >>CPU - the bedrock basics of any system.
    >>
    >>Gaming and overclocking are way down your priority list - even though
    >>ye may be hung as heretic for openly saying so.
    >>
    >>You still require a fast, powerful workhorse that will do graphical/3D
    >>work, video editing, act as hub for a potential home recording studio,
    >>and, of course, perform all the usual computing tasks that we nowadays
    >>take for granted.
    >>
    >>In addition to the usual USB ports, you require a mix of PCI and
    >>PCI-e, SATA, ATA, RAID, Firewire ('a' or 'b' but 'b' would be better),
    >>Audio, and LAN capability.
    >>
    >>Which **64bit capable AMD CPU/Mobo combo (ATX)** would you choose from
    >>here:
    >>
    >>www.ascent.co.nz

    >
    >
    > http://www.ascent.co.nz/ProductSpecification.aspx?ItemID=342509
    >
    >
    > If I was building a $3.5K system (which I did a few weeks ago) then I
    > would go for the AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400 Dual Core CPU (which I did a few
    > weeks ago).
    >
    >
    > Let me get the invoice *rummage*
    >
    > AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400+ Dual-Core
    > Asus A8N-SLI (10xUSB2, Firewire, 4xSATA, 2xPATA, RAID, PCI-E, 5.1 Audio,
    > GB LAN)
    > 2 x Hynix DDR400 1024MB PC3200 16C Grade RAM
    > Nvidia 7900GB 256MB PCI-E DDR3 Dual DVI HDT TV-OUT
    > Cooler Master Centurion 5 Case
    > AcBel 550W PSU
    > 2 x Seagate 300GB SATA2 16MB Cache 7200RPM HDD
    >
    > That was under $3K incl GST, at the price I paid I could add a 19" LCD +
    > Logitech Laser mouse and still keep it under $3.5K. Anyway, I would
    > thoroughly recommend everything I listed.


    Or another graphics card to utilise the SLI...
    Jerry, Apr 13, 2006
    #18
  19. Tony McKee

    Tony McKee Guest

    "Matthew Poole" <> wrote in message
    news:p...

    > On Thu, 13 Apr 2006 00:21:05 +1200, someone purporting to be Tony McKee
    > didst scrawl:
    >
    > > "Matthew Poole" <> wrote in message
    > > news:p...

    > *SNIP*
    > > I didn't want to get into one of these AMD vs Intel situations, but, er,

    >
    > Oh, please, you knew it was coming.


    Was it the hairdo? Or the faint residual squeak of self-doubt from my Intel
    shoes as I tip-toed into this newsgroup?

    > Surely there's a shop out there, catering to Asian students, that sells
    > them pre-painted?


    Wifey's not an Asian student. She's a Scot. She'll expect me to buy the
    paint and brushes as cheaply as possible, execute the work myself, and have
    my face and hands washed in time for tea. ;-)

    > OK, I'm making a few assumptions.
    > 1) You're asking for 1394 (good man, USB2 is an evil, evil hack), so you
    > don't care too much about the number of USB headers.
    > 2) You don't give a flying fruitcake about SLI.
    > 3) Four SATA2 connectors is sufficient.
    >
    > On that basis,
    > http://www.ascent.co.nz/ProductSpecification.aspx?ItemID=345333 is more
    > than adequate. It's got support for three 1394b ports, which I would call
    > a totally acceptable trade-off on only having six USB2 ports.
    >
    > For a CPU, I'd be looking at an X2 4200+, which is the 2.2GHz dual-core.
    > Those two together take care of your $1k limitation, with a tiny bit of
    > change.


    Thanks for this - good recommendation. As impressed as I am with Mark Heyes'
    new rig, this one sounds like my flight path to Planet AMD. The Gigabyte
    GA-K8NF9 Ultra appears to be the 'AMD answer' to another Intel-based board
    of Gigabyte's - the Gigabyte GA-8I955X Pro.


    Cheers, Tony McKee

    --

    ---
    I am a part of all that I have met... yet all experience is but an arch
    Wherethro' gleams that untravel'd world whose margins fade
    Forever and forever... 'ere I move.

    ===-- Ulysses --===
    Tony McKee, Apr 13, 2006
    #19
  20. Tony McKee

    Tony McKee Guest

    "MarkH" <> wrote in message
    news:2Kf%f.85608$...

    > "Tony McKee" <> wrote in
    > news:Hh6%f.12727$:
    >
    > > Imagine:
    > >
    > > You have a budget of $NZ 3,500 to spend on a DIY rig.
    > >
    > > Up to **$NZ 1000** of that 3.5K budget could be spent on the mobo and
    > > CPU - the bedrock basics of any system.


    > http://www.ascent.co.nz/ProductSpecification.aspx?ItemID=342509
    >
    >
    > If I was building a $3.5K system (which I did a few weeks ago) then I
    > would go for the AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400 Dual Core CPU (which I did a few
    > weeks ago).
    >
    >
    > Let me get the invoice *rummage*
    >
    > AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400+ Dual-Core
    > Asus A8N-SLI (10xUSB2, Firewire, 4xSATA, 2xPATA, RAID, PCI-E, 5.1 Audio,
    > GB LAN)
    > 2 x Hynix DDR400 1024MB PC3200 16C Grade RAM
    > Nvidia 7900GB 256MB PCI-E DDR3 Dual DVI HDT TV-OUT
    > Cooler Master Centurion 5 Case
    > AcBel 550W PSU
    > 2 x Seagate 300GB SATA2 16MB Cache 7200RPM HDD
    >
    > That was under $3K incl GST, at the price I paid I could add a 19" LCD +
    > Logitech Laser mouse and still keep it under $3.5K. Anyway, I would
    > thoroughly recommend everything I listed.


    Hell's Teeth - that's a dragster! What sort of cooler have you on the CPU? I
    see a bloody big square thing on the double-fanged rig featured on Page 4 of
    the GamePC review (accessible from the side-bar on that web page).

    The reviewers ran into a suspected electrical interference glitch when
    twinning GeForce 6800 cards on their test machine (Page 5). Do you know if
    that is a widespread issue with such rigs?

    Good PSU too.


    Cheers, Tony McKee

    --

    ---
    I am a part of all that I have met... yet all experience is but an arch
    Wherethro' gleams that untravel'd world whose margins fade
    Forever and forever... 'ere I move.

    ===-- Ulysses --===
    Tony McKee, Apr 13, 2006
    #20
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