That is NOT the colour of the sky!!!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Mar 7, 2011.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-72157621949266496/

    God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at in
    photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is different
    as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always blue,
    barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    purged from censors.
     
    RichA, Mar 7, 2011
    #1
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  2. RichA

    Guest

    On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 11:15:39 -0800 (PST), RichA <> wrote:

    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-72157621949266496/
    >
    > God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at in
    > photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is different
    > as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always blue,
    > barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    > industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    > "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    > purged from censors.


    That looks like a typical Australian sky.
     
    , Mar 7, 2011
    #2
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  3. RichA

    GA Guest

    "RichA" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-72157621949266496/
    >
    > God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at in
    > photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is different
    > as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always blue,
    > barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    > industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    > "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    > purged from censors.




    I guess now's probably a bad time to ask how the Hubble is able to produce
    images that are vibrant in color and not B&W?
     
    GA, Mar 7, 2011
    #3
  4. RichA

    ASCII Guest

    RichA wrote:
    >http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-72157621949266496/
    >
    >God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at in
    >photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is different
    >as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always blue,
    >barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    >industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    >"live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    >purged from censors.


    Considering the cloudy haze behind that sweetgum tree,
    it's still a light (baby) blue to me, not cyan.
    Maybe you need to adjust your monitor (lessen the green)?

    (wtf)
    censors
    sensors
    (/wtf)
    --

    ÿØÿá
     
    ASCII, Mar 7, 2011
    #4
  5. RichA

    ASCII Guest

    Gary Edstrom wrote:
    >On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 11:15:39 -0800 (PST), RichA <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-72157621949266496/
    >>
    >>God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at in
    >>photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is different
    >>as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always blue,
    >>barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    >>industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    >>"live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    >>purged from censors.

    >
    >Actually, the real color of the sky is black! It only looks blue due to
    >bending and scattering of light caused by the earth's atmosphere. Look
    >at the pictures the astronauts brought back from the moon: The sky is
    >black.
    >
    >Gary


    If you must harvest a nit, maybe select one from the same vine.
    In the referenced photo the 'sky' part is from a terrestrial perspective,
    as evidenced by the 'earthly' type dwellings,
    not out in space, or even the surface of mars.
     
    ASCII, Mar 7, 2011
    #5
  6. RichA

    ASCII Guest

    ASCII, Mar 7, 2011
    #6
  7. RichA

    Peter Chant Guest

    Gary Edstrom wrote:


    > Actually, the real color of the sky is black! It only looks blue due to
    > bending and scattering of light caused by the earth's atmosphere. Look
    > at the pictures the astronauts brought back from the moon: The sky is
    > black.


    I'm not so sure, on average it is grey around here.

    --
    http://www.petezilla.co.uk
     
    Peter Chant, Mar 7, 2011
    #7
  8. RichA

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 08 Mar 2011 00:35:13 -0600, Better Info <>
    wrote:

    >On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 21:43:32 -0800, Paul Furman <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>The solution is negative exposure compensation, then boost in post but
    >>that makes the shadows more noisy, particularly skies if you don't need it.

    >
    >Doesn't matter. For all this technological mental-masturbation (i.e.
    >distractions from the REAL problem), I've yet to see any of you produce any
    >images where noise even matters.


    Or us, you.

    The real noise is you flapping your gums about something you evidently
    can't do: take good photographs.



    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Mar 8, 2011
    #8
  9. RichA

    RichA Guest

    On Mar 8, 2:49 am, N <> wrote:
    > On 8/03/2011, RichA wrote:
    > >http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-72...

    >
    > > God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at in
    > > photos.  The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue.  The deepness is different
    > > as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always blue,
    > > barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    > > industrial pollution or volcanoes).  I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    > > "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    > > purged from censors.

    >
    > How long since you calibrated your monitor?  That looks the same colour
    > as the sky outside my living room.


    Time for that vision check you always wanted. I'm looking out my
    office window. The sky is blue to the horizon, not cyan.
     
    RichA, Mar 8, 2011
    #9
  10. RichA

    Martin Brown Guest

    On 07/03/2011 20:50, GA wrote:
    > "RichA" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-72157621949266496/
    >>
    >>
    >> God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at in
    >> photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is different
    >> as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always blue,
    >> barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    >> industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    >> "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    >> purged from censors.


    Oh rubbish. The sky at temperate latitudes is quite often borderline
    cyan particularly at low elevations - my sky outside is exactly the
    colour you claim it cannot be today!

    > I guess now's probably a bad time to ask how the Hubble is able to
    > produce images that are vibrant in color and not B&W?


    Not a good choice. The raw Hubble images are all monochrome.

    A lot of the Hubble images are false colour taken through very
    narrowband filters - often with an unintuitive mapping. eg.

    SII (dark red) - red
    HI 656nm (red) - green
    OIII 501nm (green/cyan) - blue

    That mapping is sometimes referred to as the Hubble palette. eg
    http://www.cosmicphotos.com/gallery/image.php?fld_image_id=153&fld_album_id=11

    For artistic reasons they sometimes permute them with

    HI red, OIII green and SII blue eg

    http://www.noao.edu/outreach/press/pr01/ir0101.html

    The horsehead nebula would look funny any other colour.

    Regards,
    Martin Brown
     
    Martin Brown, Mar 8, 2011
    #10
  11. RichA

    RichA Guest

    On Mar 8, 9:31 am, Martin Brown <|||>
    wrote:
    > On 07/03/2011 20:50, GA wrote:
    >
    > > "RichA" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...
    > >>http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-72....

    >
    > >> God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at in
    > >> photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is different
    > >> as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always blue,
    > >> barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    > >> industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    > >> "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    > >> purged from censors.

    >
    > Oh rubbish. The sky at temperate latitudes is quite often borderline
    > cyan particularly at low elevations - my sky outside is exactly the
    > colour you claim it cannot be today!
    >
    > > I guess now's probably a bad time to ask how the Hubble is able to
    > > produce images that are vibrant in color and not B&W?

    >
    > Not a good choice. The raw Hubble images are all monochrome.
    >
    > A lot of the Hubble images are false colour taken through very
    > narrowband filters - often with an unintuitive mapping. eg.
    >
    > SII (dark red) - red
    > HI  656nm (red) - green
    > OIII 501nm (green/cyan) - blue
    >
    > That mapping is sometimes referred to as the Hubble palette. eghttp://www..cosmicphotos.com/gallery/image.php?fld_image_id=153&fld_al...
    >
    > For artistic reasons they sometimes permute them with
    >
    > HI red, OIII green and SII blue eg
    >
    > http://www.noao.edu/outreach/press/pr01/ir0101.html
    >
    > The horsehead nebula would look funny any other colour.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Martin Brown


    Have they ever sent a Bayer filtered-sensored camera into space?
     
    RichA, Mar 8, 2011
    #11
  12. > Have they ever sent a Bayer filtered-sensored camera into space?

    Of course - plenty of Nikon DSLRs on the International Space Station.
     
    David J Taylor, Mar 8, 2011
    #12
  13. RichA

    Peter N Guest

    On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 11:15:39 -0800 (PST), RichA <>
    wrote:
    >

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-7215
    7621949266496/


    > God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at in
    > photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is different
    > as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always blue,
    > barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    > industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    > "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    > purged from censors.


    Don't look. Just say no.

    --
    from my Droid
     
    Peter N, Mar 8, 2011
    #13
  14. RichA

    Peter N Guest

    On Mon, 07 Mar 2011 16:03:18 -0600, George Kerby
    <> wrote:
    > On 3/7/11 1:15 PM, in article
    > ,

    "RichA"
    > <> wrote:



    > >

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-7215
    7621949
    > > 266496/
    > >
    > > God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at

    in
    > > photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is

    different
    > > as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always

    blue,
    > > barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    > > industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    > > "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can

    be
    > > purged from censors.



    > Well it looks like you pretty much 'censored' it already, fool.


    He can't even spell censor.

    --
    from my Droid
     
    Peter N, Mar 8, 2011
    #14
  15. RichA

    Peter N Guest

    On Tue, 08 Mar 2011 18:49:23 +1100, N <> wrote:
    > On 8/03/2011, RichA wrote:
    > >

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-7215
    7621949266496/
    > >
    > > God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at

    in
    > > photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is

    different
    > > as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always

    blue,
    > > barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    > > industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    > > "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can

    be
    > > purged from censors.



    > How long since you calibrated your monitor? That looks the same

    colour
    > as the sky outside my living room.


    I can think of parts of his anatomy that could use calibration.

    --
    from my Droid
     
    Peter N, Mar 8, 2011
    #15
  16. In message <>, bugbear
    <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> writes
    >RichA wrote:
    >> I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    >> "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    >> purged from censors.

    >
    >Yes; they should be banned.
    >


    Would banning a censor depend of the shade of blue in his pencil?

    > BugBear
    >


    --
    Peter

    Ying tong iddle-i po!
     
    Peter Twydell, Mar 9, 2011
    #16
  17. RichA

    Peter N Guest

    On Wed, 09 Mar 2011 05:43:50 -0600, Neil Ellwood
    <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 08 Mar 2011 16:01:13 -0500, Peter N wrote:



    > > On Tue, 08 Mar 2011 18:49:23 +1100, N <> wrote:
    > >> On 8/03/2011, RichA wrote:
    > >> >

    > >

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/9476880@N02/4430224345/sizes/o/in/set-7215

    > > 7621949266496/
    > >> >
    > >> > God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look

    at
    > > in
    > >> > photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is

    > > different
    > >> > as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always

    > > blue,
    > >> > barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like

    from
    > >> > industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan

    sky
    > >> > "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this

    can
    > > be
    > >> > purged from censors.

    > >
    > >
    > >> How long since you calibrated your monitor? That looks the same

    > > colour
    > >> as the sky outside my living room.

    > >
    > > I can think of parts of his anatomy that could use calibration.



    > Is calibration really the term you were looking for? I believe that
    > termination would be a more relevant one.


    I am not violent.

    --
    from my Droid
     
    Peter N, Mar 9, 2011
    #17
  18. RichA

    John Turco Guest

    ASCII wrote:
    >
    > > Gary Edstrom wrote:
    > >> On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 11:15:39 -0800 (PST), RichA <>
    > >> wrote:


    <edited>

    > >> God how I dislike the colour-shifted cyan skies I have to look at in
    > >> photos. The sky is NOT cyan, it is blue. The deepness is different
    > >> as you go further or nearer the Sun, but the colour is always blue,
    > >> barring sunsets and particulate contaminants in the air (like from
    > >> industrial pollution or volcanoes). I have NEVER seen a cyan sky
    > >> "live" in my life and they should work to figure out how this can be
    > >> purged from censors.

    > >
    > > Actually, the real color of the sky is black! It only looks blue due to
    > > bending and scattering of light caused by the earth's atmosphere. Look
    > > at the pictures the astronauts brought back from the moon: The sky is
    > > black.
    > >
    > > Gary

    >
    > If you must harvest a nit, maybe select one from the same vine.
    > In the referenced photo the 'sky' part is from a terrestrial perspective,
    > as evidenced by the 'earthly' type dwellings,
    > not out in space, or even the surface of mars.



    I've sometimes "made" a blue sky turn quite dark, when using the manual
    settings of my Kodak "P850" (12x optical zoom digicam). It has happened,
    in trying to capture better shots of earth's "natural satellite."

    Excellent results have been obtained, featuring a properly exposed moon
    and a black sky.

    --
    Cordially,
    John Turco <>

    Marie's Musings <http://fairiesandtails.blogspot.com>
     
    John Turco, Mar 31, 2011
    #18
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