Testing Open Ports

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Al, Sep 30, 2009.

  1. Al

    Al Guest

    Hi All,

    I want to clarify a few misconceptions I (think) I have about ports,
    and specifically testing whether or not they are open.

    1. Whats the best way to test if a port is open on a computer. I dont
    nessecarily mean testing if its open to the internet, but just on the
    computer - this rules out online port scanners since many PC's will be
    behind a router, and I am not testing that, but more software based
    firewalls that may be running.

    1a. Does a service or program have to be listening on a port to test
    if its open, or is there a way for example I could open a port on a
    software based firewall, and test if its open without anything
    listening on that port?

    2. With netstat -an what do the *.* mean?

    2a. It appears to me that netstat -an only show ports that are (a)
    open and (b) have a program/service listening or using it?

    3. Whats the best software to do this?

    Any positive replies appreciated.

    -Al
    Al, Sep 30, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. 1) You "Open" a port by installing software that uses that port.
    2) You "close" a port by uninstalling software that uses the port.
    3) You "block" a port by opening it ( see #1) and putting a firewall in
    front of it.



    > 1a. Does a service or program have to be listening on a port to test
    > if its open, or is there a way for example I could open a port on a
    > software based firewall, and test if its open without anything
    > listening on that port?


    See # 1. Opening a port on the firewall is different from opening a port on
    a computer.

    > 2a. It appears to me that netstat -an only show ports that are (a)
    > open and (b) have a program/service listening or using it?


    See #1.

    Hypothetically, if a port is open and no one is listening to accept the
    communication on the other end, is the port *really* open?


    hth
    DDS
    "Al" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I want to clarify a few misconceptions I (think) I have about ports,
    > and specifically testing whether or not they are open.
    >
    > 1. Whats the best way to test if a port is open on a computer. I dont
    > nessecarily mean testing if its open to the internet, but just on the
    > computer - this rules out online port scanners since many PC's will be
    > behind a router, and I am not testing that, but more software based
    > firewalls that may be running.
    >
    > 1a. Does a service or program have to be listening on a port to test
    > if its open, or is there a way for example I could open a port on a
    > software based firewall, and test if its open without anything
    > listening on that port?
    >
    > 2. With netstat -an what do the *.* mean?
    >
    > 2a. It appears to me that netstat -an only show ports that are (a)
    > open and (b) have a program/service listening or using it?
    >
    > 3. Whats the best software to do this?
    >
    > Any positive replies appreciated.
    >
    > -Al
    Danny Sanders, Sep 30, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Al

    G. Morgan Guest

    G. Morgan, Sep 30, 2009
    #3
  4. Al

    why? Guest

    On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 11:35:11 -0700 (PDT), Al wrote:

    x-post trimmed to 24HSHD from
    microsoft.public.windows.networking.firewall,24hoursupport.helpdesk

    >Hi All,
    >
    >I want to clarify a few misconceptions I (think) I have about ports,
    >and specifically testing whether or not they are open.


    Reading lots :)

    Port States
    http://userpages.umbc.edu/~jeehye/cmsc491b/lectures/tcpstate/sld001.htm
    If you really want the low down, writing, how it works and nitty gritty
    of the whole setup,

    The set of 3,
    http://www.amazon.com/TCP-IP-Illustrated-1-Protocols/dp/0201633469

    and the UNIX set
    http://www.amazon.com/Unix-Network-Programming-Sockets-Networking/dp/0131411551

    The RFCs of course
    http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc793.html
    Establishing a connection
    Closing a Connection

    There is plenty of code about for TCP/IP server/client apps, you could
    alter one to listen on lots of ports. As well as client / server apps.

    >1. Whats the best way to test if a port is open on a computer. I dont
    >nessecarily mean testing if its open to the internet, but just on the
    >computer - this rules out online port scanners since many PC's will be
    >behind a router, and I am not testing that, but more software based
    >firewalls that may be running.


    You write an app to scan ports, download a port scanner to run locally.

    You wouldn't be able to determine if a software firewall is active, lack
    of a client / server response because a listener isn't running isn't the
    same.

    You may be better off testing the services list for the names of known
    firewall services as well.

    >1a. Does a service or program have to be listening on a port to test
    >if its open, or is there a way for example I could open a port on a


    Yes, that's the idea of an open (state) of a port.

    >software based firewall, and test if its open without anything
    >listening on that port?


    No, no listner isn't a response.

    >2. With netstat -an what do the *.* mean?


    That would be the several places to search / read where * is for port
    not established :)

    >2a. It appears to me that netstat -an only show ports that are (a)
    >open and (b) have a program/service listening or using it?


    Yes, otherwise ports wouldn't exist to be listed.

    >3. Whats the best software to do this?


    A scan, well I would use
    http://nmap.org/
    You need the permission of security / lan admin for this, I have heard
    of a few places where it's considered a security breach to run it.

    >Any positive replies appreciated.


    :->

    www.google.com
    network port scanner

    http://netsecurity.about.com/cs/hackertools/a/aafreeportscan.htm

    There are many sites with security tools, and lists such as

    www.tucows.com , all categories IS/IT section.
    http://download.cnet.com/windows/monitoring-software/

    Likely to be other links to security tools in some of my older posts in
    24HSHD as well.

    Me
    why?, Sep 30, 2009
    #4
  5. Al

    Guest

    Al <> wrote:

    >1a. Does a service or program have to be listening on a port to test
    >if its open, or is there a way for example I could open a port on a
    >software based firewall, and test if its open without anything
    >listening on that port?


    www.GRC.COM has ShieldsUP!. This statement usually starts an argument,
    but it will show if you have any open ports.
    --

    Because you always wanted to know what happens when you hit a piano key.
    http://www.concertpitchpiano.com/grandactionanimated.gif
    , Oct 1, 2009
    #5
  6. Al

    Gerard Bok Guest

    On Fri, 2 Oct 2009 10:05:18 +0100, "Brian Cryer"
    <not.here@localhost> wrote:

    >"Al" <> wrote in message
    >news:...


    >> I want to clarify a few misconceptions I (think) I have about ports,
    >> and specifically testing whether or not they are open.

    >
    >Danny has given an excellent overview, which covers most points.
    >
    >> 1. Whats the best way to test if a port is open on a computer. I dont
    >> nessecarily mean testing if its open to the internet, but just on the
    >> computer - this rules out online port scanners since many PC's will be
    >> behind a router, and I am not testing that, but more software based
    >> firewalls that may be running.

    >
    >A simple way is to use telnet.
    >
    >Open a new command prompt window and enter:
    > telnet computerName port
    >using the name of the computer and port that you wish to test.
    >
    >If it simply says "Connecting To computerName..." and eventually times out
    >then there is either nothing listening on that port or its blocked. ANY
    >other response indicates that something is listening on that port.


    True. But alternatively, getting nothing in return with telnet
    does not imply that nothing is listening on that port :)
    (As I recently found out when attempting to ascertain if a SSL
    host was listening :)

    >Alternatively download cryping (command line utility) and you can use it to
    >test a port using:
    > cryping computerName -port port
    >It will indicate whether or not it could successfully connect to the port.
    >You can download it here http://www.cryer.co.uk/downloads/cryping/


    Nice tool ! Correction: very nice tool!
    And it gets a respons from SSL :)

    >Hope this helps.


    Certainly helped me :)

    --
    met vriendelijke groet,
    Gerard Bok
    Gerard Bok, Oct 3, 2009
    #6
  7. Al

    2Sweet Guest

    By running "telnet" command from a Windows 2003 server to internet website,
    it was successful.
    From the result, am i right to say that traffic flows on both ways (inbound
    & outbound) are NOT blocked???


    "Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Al" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi All,
    >>
    >> I want to clarify a few misconceptions I (think) I have about ports,
    >> and specifically testing whether or not they are open.

    >
    > Danny has given an excellent overview, which covers most points.
    >
    >> 1. Whats the best way to test if a port is open on a computer. I dont
    >> nessecarily mean testing if its open to the internet, but just on the
    >> computer - this rules out online port scanners since many PC's will be
    >> behind a router, and I am not testing that, but more software based
    >> firewalls that may be running.

    >
    > A simple way is to use telnet.
    >
    > Open a new command prompt window and enter:
    > telnet computerName port
    > using the name of the computer and port that you wish to test.
    >
    > If it simply says "Connecting To computerName..." and eventually times out
    > then there is either nothing listening on that port or its blocked. ANY
    > other response indicates that something is listening on that port.
    >
    > Alternatively download cryping (command line utility) and you can use it
    > to test a port using:
    > cryping computerName -port port
    > It will indicate whether or not it could successfully connect to the port.
    > You can download it here http://www.cryer.co.uk/downloads/cryping/
    >
    > Hope this helps.
    > --
    > Brian Cryer
    > www.cryer.co.uk/brian
    2Sweet, Dec 11, 2009
    #7
  8. Al

    why? Guest

    x-post trimmed to 24HSHD from
    microsoft.public.windows.networking.firewall,24hoursupport.helpdesk

    On Fri, 11 Dec 2009 13:05:57 +0800, 2Sweet wrote:

    Just catching up?

    -->>> On Fri, 2 Oct 2009 10:05:18 +0100, "Brian Cryer"

    <not.here@localhost> wrote: >"Al" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> I want to clarify a few misconceptions I (think) I have about ports,
    >> and specifically testing whether or not they are open. >Danny has


    >By running "telnet" command from a Windows 2003 server to internet website,
    >it was successful.
    >From the result, am i right to say that traffic flows on both ways (inbound
    >& outbound) are NOT blocked???


    Yes, think about it. If outbound didn't get to the server it couldn't
    get back with an inbound message.

    >
    >"Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> "Al" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi All,
    >>>
    >>> I want to clarify a few misconceptions I (think) I have about ports,
    >>> and specifically testing whether or not they are open.

    >>
    >> Danny has given an excellent overview, which covers most points.
    >>
    >>> 1. Whats the best way to test if a port is open on a computer. I dont
    >>> nessecarily mean testing if its open to the internet, but just on the
    >>> computer - this rules out online port scanners since many PC's will be
    >>> behind a router, and I am not testing that, but more software based
    >>> firewalls that may be running.

    >>

    <snip>

    Me
    why?, Dec 11, 2009
    #8
  9. Al

    2Sweet Guest

    I have an application server which will access an internet website via ports
    8080, 8443 & 443 to perform updownloading task automatically by schedule.
    But always failed! I tried using IE to access, no problem) When i perform
    telnet (to those ports) on the application server to the internet server.
    It was successful. I feedback to the application vendor and they claimed
    that i have to allow inbound traffic as well for those ports.

    That is why i was wondering do i have to "allow inbound" traffic for ports
    8080, 8443 & 443. But i can access the website using IE.
    Is there different by using IE and Command to access the website?


    "Mr. Majestic" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > 2Sweet wrote:
    >> By running "telnet" command from a Windows 2003 server to internet
    >> website, it was successful.
    >> From the result, am i right to say that traffic flows on both ways
    >> (inbound & outbound) are NOT blocked???
    >>

    >
    > If outbound traffic is initiated by a program running on a computer from
    > behind any type of firewall to a remote site, that is a solicited traffic.
    > The firewall is going to allow inbound traffic form a solicited site. The
    > firewall will block all unsolicited inbound traffic from a site.
    >
    > A firewall will not block unsolicited traffic if a port on the firewall is
    > opened to allow unsolicited inbound traffic. As an example, port 80 being
    > open on a firewall that a computer behind a the firewall is listening on
    > port 80 hosting a Web server. The client's browser must initiate and send
    > unsolicited inbound traffic to the Web server before the Web server knows
    > the client is there.
    2Sweet, Dec 11, 2009
    #9
  10. Al

    why? Guest

    x-post trimmed to 24HSHD.

    On Sat, 12 Dec 2009 06:17:49 +0800, 2Sweet wrote:

    >I have an application server which will access an internet website via ports
    >8080, 8443 & 443 to perform updownloading task automatically by schedule.


    Using MS Scheduled Tasks?

    >But always failed! I tried using IE to access, no problem) When i perform


    It's your firewall log that tells you exactly how it's failing or simply
    that the command produces no result?

    Using IE how, a URL like?
    http://external.server.name:8080/

    >telnet (to those ports) on the application server to the internet server.


    By

    telnet external.server.name 8443

    >It was successful. I feedback to the application vendor and they claimed
    >that i have to allow inbound traffic as well for those ports.


    Sounds sensible, depends on the FW you are using. Even MS FW has port /
    application to allow settings you may need to add an exception to.


    >That is why i was wondering do i have to "allow inbound" traffic for ports
    >8080, 8443 & 443. But i can access the website using IE.


    So you haven't yet?

    Check the FW permissions / inbound rule for telnet.

    >Is there different by using IE and Command to access the website?


    There is a difference using MS Scheduled Tasks, these don't by default
    always run as the logged in user or for that matter no user if no one is
    logged in. It's Local System Account or the specified user. You may have
    to give Local System Account access to the executable / folder the
    command requires to run.

    >
    >"Mr. Majestic" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> 2Sweet wrote:
    >>> By running "telnet" command from a Windows 2003 server to internet
    >>> website, it was successful.
    >>> From the result, am i right to say that traffic flows on both ways
    >>> (inbound & outbound) are NOT blocked???
    >>>

    >>
    >> If outbound traffic is initiated by a program running on a computer from
    >> behind any type of firewall to a remote site, that is a solicited traffic.
    >> The firewall is going to allow inbound traffic form a solicited site. The
    >> firewall will block all unsolicited inbound traffic from a site.
    >>
    >> A firewall will not block unsolicited traffic if a port on the firewall is
    >> opened to allow unsolicited inbound traffic. As an example, port 80 being
    >> open on a firewall that a computer behind a the firewall is listening on
    >> port 80 hosting a Web server. The client's browser must initiate and send
    >> unsolicited inbound traffic to the Web server before the Web server knows
    >> the client is there.


    Me
    why?, Dec 11, 2009
    #10
  11. Al

    2Sweet Guest

    In my application server, using IE to access the remote site and using
    "telnet" command to remote site are successful (to those ports mentioned).
    Based on the result, am i right to said that those ports (8080, 8443 & 443)
    are already allowed on both inbound & outbound traffic?


    "Mr. Majestic" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > 2Sweet wrote:
    >> I have an application server which will access an internet website via
    >> ports 8080, 8443 & 443 to perform updownloading task automatically by
    >> schedule. But always failed! I tried using IE to access, no problem) When
    >> i perform telnet (to those ports) on the application server to the
    >> internet server. It was successful. I feedback to the application vendor
    >> and they claimed that i have to allow inbound traffic as well for those
    >> ports.
    >>

    > If that's what the vendor indicates that you must open those ports on your
    > firewall, then you have to do so. An application on your machine where you
    > initiate the contact to a remote site may need the ports on your end
    > opened on the firewall, which must be done manually by you by setting
    > firewall rules to open the ports.
    >
    > In this case and if your firewall has the ability to set firewall rules by
    > port number and IP, then you open the ports to the vendor's IP only,
    > blocking all other IP(s).
    >
    >> That is why i was wondering do i have to "allow inbound" traffic for
    >> ports 8080, 8443 & 443. But i can access the website using IE.
    >> Is there different by using IE and Command to access the website?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I think you're going to have to open the ports on the firewall to the
    > vendor's IP.
    >
    >> "Mr. Majestic" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> 2Sweet wrote:
    >>>> By running "telnet" command from a Windows 2003 server to internet
    >>>> website, it was successful.
    >>>> From the result, am i right to say that traffic flows on both ways
    >>>> (inbound & outbound) are NOT blocked???
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> If outbound traffic is initiated by a program running on a computer from
    >>> behind any type of firewall to a remote site, that is a solicited
    >>> traffic. The firewall is going to allow inbound traffic form a solicited
    >>> site. The firewall will block all unsolicited inbound traffic from a
    >>> site.
    >>>
    >>> A firewall will not block unsolicited traffic if a port on the firewall
    >>> is opened to allow unsolicited inbound traffic. As an example, port 80
    >>> being open on a firewall that a computer behind a the firewall is
    >>> listening on port 80 hosting a Web server. The client's browser must
    >>> initiate and send unsolicited inbound traffic to the Web server before
    >>> the Web server knows the client is there.

    >>
    2Sweet, Dec 13, 2009
    #11
  12. Al

    2Sweet Guest

    Thank for the CryPing uitility.
    I run the "CryPing" command from my application server to ping the internet
    remote site ports (8080, 8443 & 443). All results are "Successful connection
    to ......"!
    So am i right to said that those ports are allowed on both inbound &
    outbound traffic?


    "Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Al" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi All,
    >>
    >> I want to clarify a few misconceptions I (think) I have about ports,
    >> and specifically testing whether or not they are open.

    >
    > Danny has given an excellent overview, which covers most points.
    >
    >> 1. Whats the best way to test if a port is open on a computer. I dont
    >> nessecarily mean testing if its open to the internet, but just on the
    >> computer - this rules out online port scanners since many PC's will be
    >> behind a router, and I am not testing that, but more software based
    >> firewalls that may be running.

    >
    > A simple way is to use telnet.
    >
    > Open a new command prompt window and enter:
    > telnet computerName port
    > using the name of the computer and port that you wish to test.
    >
    > If it simply says "Connecting To computerName..." and eventually times out
    > then there is either nothing listening on that port or its blocked. ANY
    > other response indicates that something is listening on that port.
    >
    > Alternatively download cryping (command line utility) and you can use it
    > to test a port using:
    > cryping computerName -port port
    > It will indicate whether or not it could successfully connect to the port.
    > You can download it here http://www.cryer.co.uk/downloads/cryping/
    >
    > Hope this helps.
    > --
    > Brian Cryer
    > www.cryer.co.uk/brian
    2Sweet, Dec 13, 2009
    #12
  13. Al

    why? Guest

    x-post trimmed to 24HSHD from
    microsoft.public.windows.networking.firewall,24hoursupport.helpdesk


    On Mon, 14 Dec 2009 01:31:32 +0800, 2Sweet wrote:

    >Thank for the CryPing uitility.
    >I run the "CryPing" command from my application server to ping the internet
    >remote site ports (8080, 8443 & 443). All results are "Successful connection
    >to ......"!
    >So am i right to said that those ports are allowed on both inbound &
    >outbound traffic?


    As sort of mentioned already, those ports are open to the application
    requesting the connection.

    It's assumed the sever app you still want to run isn't running
    correctly.

    In Windows Firewall you can set Exceptions by program / port. You can
    also turn on logging, set services per network connection.

    If you can figue out the conversations / how it works you can use a
    packet trace tool like -
    http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/smsniff.html
    You don't need to install a driver, as noted on the site there are some
    limitations with that.

    >"Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> "Al" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi All,
    >>>
    >>> I want to clarify a few misconceptions I (think) I have about ports,
    >>> and specifically testing whether or not they are open.

    >>
    >> Danny has given an excellent overview, which covers most points.
    >>
    >>> 1. Whats the best way to test if a port is open on a computer. I dont
    >>> nessecarily mean testing if its open to the internet, but just on the
    >>> computer - this rules out online port scanners since many PC's will be
    >>> behind a router, and I am not testing that, but more software based

    <snip>

    Me
    why?, Dec 13, 2009
    #13
  14. Al

    2Sweet Guest

    "Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "2Sweet" <> wrote in message
    > news:uzyyH$...
    >>I have an application server which will access an internet website via
    >>ports 8080, 8443 & 443 to perform updownloading task automatically by
    >>schedule. But always failed! I tried using IE to access, no problem) When
    >>i perform telnet (to those ports) on the application server to the
    >>internet server. It was successful. I feedback to the application vendor
    >>and they claimed that i have to allow inbound traffic as well for those
    >>ports.
    >>
    >> That is why i was wondering do i have to "allow inbound" traffic for
    >> ports 8080, 8443 & 443. But i can access the website using IE.
    >> Is there different by using IE and Command to access the website?

    >
    > When you tested the ports 8080, 8443 and 443 using telnet (and cryping)
    > you were establishing that you could connect TO that server from your
    > current PC/server. It doesn't follow that you could necessarily connect
    > out in the opposite direction (because inbound and outbound rules can be
    > different) or that you could connect from a different PC (as it may have a
    > different firewall with different rules).
    >
    > So, few ideas many of which I'm sure you've already tried. I'm assuming
    > that you are connecting from your application server to a remote server.
    >
    > 1. Your telnet/cryping test was from your application server to the remote
    > server? and not from any other pc/server?


    Yes. telnet/cryping test from my application server to the internet remote
    server.

    >
    > 2. What is the application that is running on your application server? or
    > more importantly, what account does it run under? If it is running as a
    > service or off the schedular then it may well be running under an account
    > which does not have access to the network (a security measure). So if your
    > application cannot connect to the ports you need then it may not be able
    > to connect to any network resource so check the account it is running
    > under.


    I have double confirmed that it is using the correct access rights account.

    >
    > 3. The windows firewall on a PC allows you to enable/block access for
    > individual applications. Not sure whether this is the case on a server,
    > but might be another area to investigate.


    Windows server firewall on both sides are not enabled.

    > --
    > Brian Cryer
    > www.cryer.co.uk/brian
    >
    >
    >
    2Sweet, Dec 14, 2009
    #14
  15. Al

    2Sweet Guest

    Ok, i will check the firewall rule again.
    Telnet/cryping test the "outbound traffic" from application server to the
    internet remote web server.
    How to test the "inbound traffic" is allow???


    "Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> "2Sweet" <> wrote in message
    >> news:%...
    >>> Thank for the CryPing uitility.
    >>> I run the "CryPing" command from my application server to ping the
    >>> internet remote site ports (8080, 8443 & 443). All results are
    >>> "Successful connection to ......"!
    >>> So am i right to said that those ports are allowed on both inbound &
    >>> outbound traffic?

    >>
    >> As others have already said, yes, if you can "cryping" or telnet
    >> successfully to those ports then it means that something is listening on
    >> those ports. So they are not blocked by your firewall AND an application
    >> is listening on those ports.

    >
    > One thing to add, inbound and out-bound is not quite the same. You could
    > have a scenario where a firewall allowed inbound connections on a port but
    > blocked outbound. This would allow (for example) a webserver to respond
    > successfully to requests on port 8080 and yet block an application that
    > then tried to connect out on port 8080. This is because a connection is a
    > conversation, you connect on port 8080 (or whatever) and can then send and
    > receive. It is the initial connection (inbound or outbound) which a
    > firewall may block. So a firewall may allow a connection in one direction
    > but not the other.
    > --
    > Brian Cryer
    > www.cryer.co.uk/brian
    >
    2Sweet, Dec 14, 2009
    #15
  16. Al

    why? Guest

    x-post trimmed to 24HSHD from
    microsoft.public.windows.networking.firewall and 24HSHD

    On Tue, 15 Dec 2009 09:03:12 -0000, Brian Cryer wrote:

    >"2Sweet" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> "Brian Cryer" <not.here@localhost> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> "2Sweet" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:uzyyH$...
    >>>>I have an application server which will access an internet website via
    >>>>ports 8080, 8443 & 443 to perform updownloading task automatically by
    >>>>schedule. But always failed! I tried using IE to access, no problem) When
    >>>>i perform telnet (to those ports) on the application server to the
    >>>>internet server. It was successful. I feedback to the application vendor
    >>>>and they claimed that i have to allow inbound traffic as well for those
    >>>>ports.
    >>>>
    >>>> That is why i was wondering do i have to "allow inbound" traffic for
    >>>> ports 8080, 8443 & 443. But i can access the website using IE.
    >>>> Is there different by using IE and Command to access the website?
    >>>
    >>> When you tested the ports 8080, 8443 and 443 using telnet (and cryping)
    >>> you were establishing that you could connect TO that server from your
    >>> current PC/server. It doesn't follow that you could necessarily connect
    >>> out in the opposite direction (because inbound and outbound rules can be
    >>> different) or that you could connect from a different PC (as it may have
    >>> a different firewall with different rules).
    >>>


    <snip>

    >>> 2. What is the application that is running on your application server? or
    >>> more importantly, what account does it run under? If it is running as a
    >>> service or off the schedular then it may well be running under an account
    >>> which does not have access to the network (a security measure). So if
    >>> your application cannot connect to the ports you need then it may not be
    >>> able to connect to any network resource so check the account it is
    >>> running under.

    >>
    >> I have double confirmed that it is using the correct access rights
    >> account.


    I wonder what that is?

    >Are you able to run your application using the same account that YOU use? It
    >might be an interesting comparison.


    Still waiting for several answers and that's one of them :)

    From: why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz>
    Message-ID: <>
    -----
    >8080, 8443 & 443 to perform updownloading task automatically by schedule.


    Using MS Scheduled Tasks?

    >that i have to allow inbound traffic as well for those ports.


    Sounds sensible, depends on the FW you are using. Even MS FW has port /
    application to allow settings you may need to add an exception to.

    >That is why i was wondering do i have to "allow inbound" traffic for ports
    >8080, 8443 & 443. But i can access the website using IE.


    So you haven't yet?

    There is a difference using MS Scheduled Tasks, these don't by default
    always run as the logged in user or for that matter no user if no one is
    logged in. It's Local System Account

    You may have
    to give Local System Account access to the executable / folder the
    command requires to run.
    -----

    From: why? <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz>
    Message-ID: <>

    It's assumed the sever app you still want to run isn't running
    correctly.
    -----

    Me
    why?, Dec 15, 2009
    #16
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