Terms and Conditions for Exams?

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by Matt, Aug 28, 2003.

  1. Matt

    Matt Guest

    I have read the terms and conditions of the exam: 70-270.
    I have have a son going to be 14 in 2 months. He really
    likes to use computers, and I was going to buy him the
    training book (exam number above).
    Is it possiable for him to take the exam at age 14?


    Matt
    Matt, Aug 28, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Matt

    Marko Guest


    >-----Original Message-----
    >I have read the terms and conditions of the exam: 70-270.
    >I have have a son going to be 14 in 2 months. He really
    >likes to use computers, and I was going to buy him the
    >training book (exam number above).
    >Is it possiable for him to take the exam at age 14?
    >
    >
    >Matt
    >.


    Youngest I have heard of is 13.

    But - Why?
    Marko, Aug 28, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Matt

    Chris Guest


    >-----Original Message-----
    >
    >>-----Original Message-----
    >>I have read the terms and conditions of the exam: 70-270.
    >>I have have a son going to be 14 in 2 months. He really
    >>likes to use computers, and I was going to buy him the
    >>training book (exam number above).
    >>Is it possiable for him to take the exam at age 14?
    >>
    >>
    >>Matt
    >>.

    >
    >Youngest I have heard of is 13.
    >
    >But - Why?
    >
    >.
    >

    Why not? would you rather his kid go around smoking pot
    and knocking up chicks? God forbid anyone learn anything
    or do anything productive before college.
    Chris, Aug 28, 2003
    #3
  4. Matt

    Samir Patel Guest


    >-----Original Message-----
    >
    >>-----Original Message-----
    >>
    >>>-----Original Message-----
    >>>I have read the terms and conditions of the exam: 70-

    270.
    >>>I have have a son going to be 14 in 2 months. He really
    >>>likes to use computers, and I was going to buy him the
    >>>training book (exam number above).
    >>>Is it possiable for him to take the exam at age 14?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Matt
    >>>.

    >>
    >>Youngest I have heard of is 13.
    >>
    >>But - Why?
    >>
    >>.
    >>

    >Why not? would you rather his kid go around smoking pot
    >and knocking up chicks? God forbid anyone learn anything
    >or do anything productive before college.
    >.
    >


    God forbid anyone enjoying themselves. If he wants to
    start taking MCP exams, then I'm sure he'll find out for
    himself - let him play football (sorry, soccer if you're
    an American), go out & have some fun if he wants.
    Samir Patel, Aug 28, 2003
    #4
  5. "Samir Patel" <> wrote in message
    news:008201c36d8c$69c91260$...
    > let him play football (sorry, soccer if you're an American)


    You were right the first time.


    --
    Fris "American Football, European Kickyball" beeĀ® MCNGP #13

    http://www.mcngp.tk
    The MCNGP Team - We're here to help
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?Frisbee=AE_MCNGP?=, Aug 28, 2003
    #5
  6. Matt

    Chris Guest

    It's called balance. I'm sure nobody expects him to do
    MCP exams for the rest of his life. But at 14 it is not
    too early to start teaching resposibility and work/life
    balance. Chrsit no wonder the kids of today are such
    pussies.


    >-----Original Message-----
    >
    >>-----Original Message-----
    >>
    >>>-----Original Message-----
    >>>
    >>>>-----Original Message-----
    >>>>I have read the terms and conditions of the exam: 70-

    >270.
    >>>>I have have a son going to be 14 in 2 months. He

    really
    >>>>likes to use computers, and I was going to buy him the
    >>>>training book (exam number above).
    >>>>Is it possiable for him to take the exam at age 14?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Matt
    >>>>.
    >>>
    >>>Youngest I have heard of is 13.
    >>>
    >>>But - Why?
    >>>
    >>>.
    >>>

    >>Why not? would you rather his kid go around smoking pot
    >>and knocking up chicks? God forbid anyone learn

    anything
    >>or do anything productive before college.
    >>.
    >>

    >
    >God forbid anyone enjoying themselves. If he wants to
    >start taking MCP exams, then I'm sure he'll find out for
    >himself - let him play football (sorry, soccer if you're
    >an American), go out & have some fun if he wants.
    >.
    >
    Chris, Aug 28, 2003
    #6
  7. Matt

    Jtyc Guest

    > american foot-ball.. only one person on the team kicks.. maybe should be
    > american throwball.


    It is football, just with a different set of rules.


    "The story of football began sometime during the 19th century in England
    when a soccer player, frustrated at using only his feet to manipulate the
    ball, decided to simply pick it up and run with it. Although it was clearly
    against the rules of soccer, other players soon found the new way of playing
    soccer appealing and thus, the sport of rugby was born.

    The new sport soon became a world-wide success that found its way into
    America by the mid-1800s. Played by many northeastern colleges, it was not
    long before Harvard University and Yale University met in Massachussetts in
    1876 to formalize the rules to rugby that were similar to those in England.
    There were differences however: instead of playing with a round ball, the
    schools opted for an egg-shaped and the game's name was changed from rugby
    to football. To finalize the meeting, an organization called the
    Intercollegiate Football Association(IFA) was created to preside over the
    Americanized sport.

    Football was still mainly American rugby--much different from the popular
    sport known today. Over the course of three years starting in 1880, Yale
    player Walter Camp eventually convinced the IFA to change a series of rules
    in football to create a game that is very similar today. For that, Camp is
    considered by historians as the father of modern football. "
    Jtyc, Aug 28, 2003
    #7
  8. Matt

    Consultant Guest

    or drive


    "Jay Walters" <> wrote in message
    news:031601c36d93$e44d7f10$...
    > He could... but it's not worth the money. - It'll be
    > outdated before he's old enough to work fulltime :)
    >
    >
    >
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > >I have read the terms and conditions of the exam: 70-270.
    > >I have have a son going to be 14 in 2 months. He really
    > >likes to use computers, and I was going to buy him the
    > >training book (exam number above).
    > >Is it possiable for him to take the exam at age 14?
    > >
    > >
    > >Matt
    > >.
    > >
    Consultant, Aug 28, 2003
    #8
  9. "Jtyc" <> wrote in message
    news:O$...
    > > american foot-ball.. only one person on the team kicks.. maybe should be
    > > american throwball.

    >
    > It is football, just with a different set of rules.


    GATORS GONNA ROLL!1!11!!!!


    --
    Fris "rsfckin' A" beeĀ® MCNGP #13

    http://www.mcngp.tk
    The MCNGP Team - We're here to help
    =?Windows-1252?Q?Frisbee=AE_MCNGP?=, Aug 28, 2003
    #9
  10. Matt

    Maestro Guest

    His dad's original post said that he was going to get him
    the study guide. He didn't say anything about making him
    take the exam. As far as having fun goes you're assuming
    that he want's to play football, soccer, or whatever.
    You're also assuming that he can't do both if he wants
    to. Where do you think these kid wizards get their
    knowledge? It's not by osmosis I guarantee you. They
    learn and practice. I would yield to his father's
    decision on this since he knows his son better than any of
    us posting our opinions here. Maybe his idea of having
    fun is learning about networking technology. Are you guys
    really that insecure in your place in life that you would
    deny a kid an opportunity to learn and grow? The kid is
    just getting ready to turn 14. That means that he won't
    be a threat to you for another 3 or 4 years. If his dad
    thinks that he'll enjoy it my opinion is to go for it and
    get him the study guide. He may become so enthralled that
    he'll want to consume more knowledge about the industry.
    This kid could end up being the next Bill Gates (only an
    analogy). I really don't understand why some adults want
    to stifle our youths. OK, I'm done.

    >-----Original Message-----
    >
    >>-----Original Message-----
    >>
    >>>-----Original Message-----
    >>>
    >>>>-----Original Message-----
    >>>>I have read the terms and conditions of the exam: 70-

    >270.
    >>>>I have have a son going to be 14 in 2 months. He

    really
    >>>>likes to use computers, and I was going to buy him the
    >>>>training book (exam number above).
    >>>>Is it possiable for him to take the exam at age 14?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Matt
    >>>>.
    >>>
    >>>Youngest I have heard of is 13.
    >>>
    >>>But - Why?
    >>>
    >>>.
    >>>

    >>Why not? would you rather his kid go around smoking pot
    >>and knocking up chicks? God forbid anyone learn

    anything
    >>or do anything productive before college.
    >>.
    >>

    >
    >God forbid anyone enjoying themselves. If he wants to
    >start taking MCP exams, then I'm sure he'll find out for
    >himself - let him play football (sorry, soccer if you're
    >an American), go out & have some fun if he wants.
    >.
    >
    Maestro, Aug 28, 2003
    #10
  11. Matt

    KLXrider Guest

    On Thu, 28 Aug 2003 12:59:39 -0700, "Jtyc" <>
    wrote:

    >on any given
    >Sunday


    Thats dirtbikes, not football.

    KLXrider, MCNGP #18
    KLXrider, Aug 28, 2003
    #11
  12. Matt

    billyw Guest

    i've actually got any given sunday (dvd) ... 6/10

    maybe air coryell, anything could happen a while back.. marino maybe.
    redskins of 82... yea great 3 yards and a cloud of dust, anything could
    happen, but invariably nothing did

    "Jtyc" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > i know.. i used to be a big fan of US football but then got bored with

    it
    >
    > whoa.... You got bored with a sport where anything can happen on any given
    > Sunday but you still watch a game that goes an hour with one goal? A game
    > in which the world champions are decided by a kickoff?
    >
    >
    >
    > you crazy english people...
    >
    >
    billyw, Aug 28, 2003
    #12
  13. Matt

    Jtyc Guest

    > i've actually got any given sunday (dvd) ... 6/10
    >
    > maybe air coryell, anything could happen a while back.. marino maybe.
    > redskins of 82... yea great 3 yards and a cloud of dust, anything could
    > happen, but invariably nothing did


    I'll have you know my team is the most prolific scoring team ever. Yes,
    that's right, the 98' Minnesota Vikings. If you missed that season, you
    missed one hell of a show.
    Jtyc, Aug 28, 2003
    #13

  14. >I'll have you know my team is the most prolific scoring

    team ever. Yes,
    >that's right, the 98' Minnesota Vikings. If you missed

    that season, you
    >missed one hell of a show.
    >


    I think I went to about 6 of those home games... That was
    the all time glory team. I don't care what anyone says.
    They were better than the 16-0 Dolphins!!! Except for the
    Denny factor.

    By the way, I am going to the game tonight... I get off
    work in about 40 min, going to walk down there (only 4
    blocks away... right down the street on 5th street) get a
    drink at the local bar (that's pub to you billy), then
    head into the game... Game time is in 2 hrs, 8 min.
    Keyboard Cowboy, Aug 28, 2003
    #14
  15. Matt

    Maestro Guest

    How long have you been waiting to share that information?

    >-----Original Message-----
    >> american foot-ball.. only one person on the team

    kicks.. maybe should be
    >> american throwball.

    >
    >It is football, just with a different set of rules.
    >
    >
    >"The story of football began sometime during the 19th

    century in England
    >when a soccer player, frustrated at using only his feet

    to manipulate the
    >ball, decided to simply pick it up and run with it.

    Although it was clearly
    >against the rules of soccer, other players soon found the

    new way of playing
    >soccer appealing and thus, the sport of rugby was born.
    >
    >The new sport soon became a world-wide success that found

    its way into
    >America by the mid-1800s. Played by many northeastern

    colleges, it was not
    >long before Harvard University and Yale University met in

    Massachussetts in
    >1876 to formalize the rules to rugby that were similar to

    those in England.
    >There were differences however: instead of playing with a

    round ball, the
    >schools opted for an egg-shaped and the game's name was

    changed from rugby
    >to football. To finalize the meeting, an organization

    called the
    >Intercollegiate Football Association(IFA) was created to

    preside over the
    >Americanized sport.
    >
    >Football was still mainly American rugby--much different

    from the popular
    >sport known today. Over the course of three years

    starting in 1880, Yale
    >player Walter Camp eventually convinced the IFA to change

    a series of rules
    >in football to create a game that is very similar today.

    For that, Camp is
    >considered by historians as the father of modern

    football. "
    >
    >
    >.
    >
    Maestro, Aug 28, 2003
    #15
  16. Matt

    Jtyc Guest

    > By the way, I am going to the game tonight... I get off
    > work in about 40 min, going to walk down there (only 4
    > blocks away... right down the street on 5th street) get a
    > drink at the local bar (that's pub to you billy), then
    > head into the game... Game time is in 2 hrs, 8 min.


    Oh yeah... I get to spend 10 bucks if I want to hear it over the internet...


    f'n capitalists...
    Jtyc, Aug 28, 2003
    #16
  17. Matt

    Maestro Guest

    ahhh... so patience is a virtue! :)

    >-----Original Message-----
    >> How long have you been waiting to share that

    information?
    >
    >Years my friend.... years.
    >
    >
    >.
    >
    Maestro, Aug 28, 2003
    #17
  18. Matt

    Marko Guest

    Although their views are all different to some extent, I
    agree with all that has been said here by the likes of
    Chris, Samir and Maestro. We went off topic after awhile.

    I simply asked Why as a matter of curiousity since I was
    struggling to conceive of any good reason. More so, one
    of two things would happen - he would pass, or fail.
    Remember, these exams aren't easy, even for wiz kid
    geniuses. Even for adults with considerable experience.

    If he was to PASS then that would likely do a lot of very
    positive things for him, at least in the short term. But
    it might adversely influence what he ends up doing in life
    or even over the next few years. He may have ended up a
    as a world's best surgeon but ends up consumed with
    computers instead. You just don't know.

    If he was to FAIL - what lasting, worthwhile, positive
    impact what that have?

    Simply, I guess I am not a big fan of making kids grow up
    fast doing adult things. Let the boy play sport for
    awhile.
    Marko, Aug 29, 2003
    #18
  19. Matt

    Jtyc Guest

    > More Like American kick his ass ball!
    > I'm from Texas and we LOVE FOOTBALL!!


    I hope your not a Cowboys fan.
    Jtyc, Aug 29, 2003
    #19
  20. To FAIL is to learn the lessons of life and to overcome, get up and try
    again not be a quitter or a loser! Besides even with failure you keep the
    knowledge and learn even more. Especially that life and tests are
    gennerally not fair! So learn to rise above the failure.
    Diana K Brown

    AS, BS, JD, N+, MCP 210, 215

    MCNGP #25?
    http://www.mcngp.tk
    The MCNGP Team - We're here to help

    "Marko" <> wrote in message
    news:07b901c36dd0$fe18a900$...
    > Although their views are all different to some extent, I
    > agree with all that has been said here by the likes of
    > Chris, Samir and Maestro. We went off topic after awhile.
    >
    > I simply asked Why as a matter of curiousity since I was
    > struggling to conceive of any good reason. More so, one
    > of two things would happen - he would pass, or fail.
    > Remember, these exams aren't easy, even for wiz kid
    > geniuses. Even for adults with considerable experience.
    >
    > If he was to PASS then that would likely do a lot of very
    > positive things for him, at least in the short term. But
    > it might adversely influence what he ends up doing in life
    > or even over the next few years. He may have ended up a
    > as a world's best surgeon but ends up consumed with
    > computers instead. You just don't know.
    >
    > If he was to FAIL - what lasting, worthwhile, positive
    > impact what that have?
    >
    > Simply, I guess I am not a big fan of making kids grow up
    > fast doing adult things. Let the boy play sport for
    > awhile.
    >
    >
    Diana K Brown, Aug 29, 2003
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. HamMan

    TERMS AND CONDITIONS VIOLATION

    HamMan, Sep 2, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    472
  2. HamMan

    TERMS AND CONDITIONS VIOLATION

    HamMan, Sep 2, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    409
    HamMan
    Sep 2, 2003
  3. Dave - Dave.net.nz

    Terms and Conditions enforcement. rant

    Dave - Dave.net.nz, May 23, 2005, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    534
    Scooter
    Jun 1, 2005
  4. Ralph Fox

    Paradise.net Terms & Conditions

    Ralph Fox, Oct 28, 2005, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    364
    joe_90
    Oct 29, 2005
  5. Matty F

    New Microsoft Terms and Conditions

    Matty F, Mar 11, 2006, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    442
    Matty F
    Mar 13, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page