Tennis VS Raquetball VS Badminton

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Willian Penn, Feb 24, 2004.

  1. Willian Penn

    Willian Penn Guest

    Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:

    Tennis (my vote)
    Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    Badminton (sissy)
















     
    Willian Penn, Feb 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. I'm not quite sure what this has to do with digital photography but, for
    what it's worth, anyone who thinks badminton is "sissy" has clearly never
    played the sport. It is a faster game and requires far more sustained
    physical energy than tennis. I cannot comment on raquetball because I have
    never played it.

    A final point which will hopefully dispel any notions that badminton is of
    no attraction to the red blooded male: can you name any other sport in which
    the standard mixed doubles formation requires the lady to don a short skirt,
    stand in front of her male partner and then bend over? I rest my case.

    Keith
     
    Keith Sheppard, Feb 24, 2004
    #2
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  3. Willian Penn

    Alan D-W Guest

    "Willian Penn" <> wrote in message
    news:-nm.com...
    > Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    >
    > Tennis (my vote)
    > Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    > Badminton (sissy)
    >


    And this is related to digital photography in some way? 35mm photography?
     
    Alan D-W, Feb 24, 2004
    #3
  4. Willian Penn

    Neil Guest

    digital photography is sissy, real men use film....

    ;-)

    "Alan D-W" <> wrote in message
    news:403b2914$0$7068$...
    >
    > "Willian Penn" <> wrote in message
    > news:-nm.com...
    > > Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    > >
    > > Tennis (my vote)
    > > Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    > > Badminton (sissy)
    > >

    >
    > And this is related to digital photography in some way? 35mm photography?
    >
    >
    >
     
    Neil, Feb 24, 2004
    #4
  5. Willian Penn

    Naked Alien Guest

    Neil wrote:

    > digital photography is sissy, real men use film....


    Only men who aren't smart enough to figure out how to operate digital
    cameras.
    --
    Naked. Alien. Naked Alien.
     
    Naked Alien, Feb 24, 2004
    #5
  6. Willian Penn

    ag Guest

    Having played all 3 sports to a good degree (and still playing Racquetball
    and Tennis week in and week out) I have to say that even for a recreational
    player:

    Badminton (very demanding and need best reflexes)
    Tennis (less demanding but needs more brains and definitely fun)
    Racquetball (pure fun that doubles as a great workout)

    If you think that Badminton is sissy, you've never played the sport as it
    should be.

    AG


    "Willian Penn" <> wrote in message
    news:-nm.com...
    > Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    >
    > Tennis (my vote)
    > Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    > Badminton (sissy)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    ag, Feb 24, 2004
    #6
  7. Willian Penn

    Kunndi Guest

    "Willian Penn" <> wrote in message
    news:-nm.com...
    > Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    >
    > Tennis (my vote)
    > Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    > Badminton (sissy)


    I've played all three and think that badminton is the best 'bang for the
    time' workout.
    It is a 'wristy' racket sport and requires quickness - a wiry person would
    do well at it.
    Tennis requires more strenth in several areas and forces you to use multiple
    different techniques
    (superset of what badminton requires).
    Racketball has aspects of both, but is inbetween.
    I would choose tennis as my favorite - I don't like being constricted inside
    a room (raquetball)
    and I prefer the larger tennis court (than a badminton court).


    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Kunndi, Feb 24, 2004
    #7
  8. Willian Penn

    Chris Guest

    "Willian Penn" <> wrote in message
    news:-nm.com...
    > Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    >
    > Tennis (my vote)
    > Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    > Badminton (sissy)


    All 3 played by both sexes, so none. Did we forget last time?
     
    Chris, Feb 24, 2004
    #8
  9. Willian Penn

    A Reys Guest

    "Willian Penn" <> wrote in message
    news:-nm.com...
    > Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    >
    > Tennis (my vote)
    > Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    > Badminton (sissy)


    Warning: Long-ish

    The most masculine? How do you define that? If you're simply looking at how
    physically demanding the three are, badminton wins hands down. The average
    career span of a modern-day professional mens singles player is around 2
    years because their bodies can't take the constant strain and begin to break
    down.

    Of the three, racquetball is more of a power game (I mean, at a certain
    skill level you can launch kill shots from anywhere on the court that will
    bounce twice within 5 feet of the main wall) but lacks depth. To be sure,
    it's immense fun and requires extremely good movement skills, but once you
    hit a specific point it's just a "hit it as low as you can" game. The great
    thing about racquetball is that it's very easy to get into. There's no net,
    there are no boundaries that you have to keep the ball away from (serve
    excluded) and it's just plain fun to be able to smack each shot as hard as
    you can.

    Tennis and badminton both require nearly identical mental and creative
    abilities. Both are very deep in terms of both strategy and their respective
    physical aspects. Aside from this the games play totally differently. Tennis
    uses a bigger court, but since the ball doesn't fly at anywhere near
    shuttlecock speeds, it allows a much greater margin for error. Exhaustion in
    tennis often comes more from hittnig shots than getting to them. Returning a
    serve or hard ground stroke will take more out of you than taking the
    necessary 5 steps to get into position.

    Badminton, on the other hand, will kill you just getting to the shot. If
    you've ever seen a professional badminton match, those guys seem to teleport
    around the court, and if you've ever played at a competitive level you can
    relate to just how hard it IS vs how easy it SEEMS to move like they do. It
    doesn't require the same kind of upper body strength as tennis or
    racquetball, focusing more on technique (yah I've met 13 year old girls that
    smash harder than me :-( ), but it requires quick feet (no matter what kind
    of shape you're in, it doesn't matter if you can run a 4 minute mile, if you
    can't move your feet quickly and change direction and momentum in a fraction
    of a second, you will never do well in competitive badminton) and absolutely
    insane reflexes. Let me emphasize that: *INSANE* reflexes. In-bloody-sane.
    Especially in doubles. Unlike tennis, singles badminton is often more of a
    finesse game while doubles badminton focuses on smashes/drives to score
    points since it's tough to finesse your way around two people on such a
    small court.

    Ok enough essay writing for now, heh. Final verdict: badminton > tennis >
    racquetball on a purely technicaly/physical level. Aside from that, it's
    just what you enjoy more (which for me breaks down identically to the
    technical scale).

    Also the whole
    mixed-doubles-partner-wearing-a-short-skirt-and-bending-over-in-front-of-you
    part is nice :)

    AReys
     
    A Reys, Feb 24, 2004
    #9
  10. Willian Penn

    A Reys Guest

    Let me just add this link if anyone is interested:
    http://www.bnl.gov/bera/activities/bminton/ten-bad.html

    It's a stastical comparison of the final matches of the 1985 All England
    Championships and the 1985 World Badminton Championships: (copied + pasted)
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    At the 1985 All England (Tennis) Championships, Boris Becker defeated Kevin
    Curren 6-3, 6-7, 7-6, 6-4. At the 1985 World Badminton Championships in
    Calgary, Canada, Han Jian of China defeated Morten Frost of Denmark, 14-18,
    15-10, 15-8. The following is a statistical comparison of those matches.
    Tennis Badminton
    Time: 3 hrs & 18 mins 1 hr & 16 mins
    Ball/Shuttle in Play: 18 mins 37 mins
    Match Intensity*: 9 percent 48 percent
    Rallies: 299 146
    Shots: 1,004 1,972
    Shots Per Rally: 3.4 3.5
    Distance Covered: 2 miles 4 miles
    * The actual time the ball/shuttle was in flight, divided by the length of
    the match.
    Note that the badminton players competed for half the time, yet ran twice as
    far and hit nearly twice as many shots.
     
    A Reys, Feb 24, 2004
    #10
  11. Willian Penn

    Alan D-W Guest

    "A Reys" <> wrote in message
    news:OwP_b.2185$...
    >
    > Warning: Too Long-ish
    >
    > The most masculine? How do you define that? If you're simply looking at

    how

    Yawn. Wake me up when you've finished
     
    Alan D-W, Feb 24, 2004
    #11
  12. Willian Penn

    Henry Hooray Guest

    Some years ago I went to a badminton match between China and Indonesia in
    the Royal Albert Hall - I think it was the final of the Thomas Cup, and
    China were back in world badminton, back in the sate seventies or early
    eighties. Specifically there was a great match between Liem Swie King and
    Han Xian (or however you would like to spell his name), truly one of the
    most amazing players I have ever seen - he beat King.

    I was chatting to one of the ushers there, and he told me that he was used
    to be present at boxing matches. But he was really impressed with the speed
    and the power of the badminton players. He said he had always thought
    badminton was a sissy game, but he certainly didn't think so anymore.

    I conceded that I never considered boxing (which I did a little of during my
    spell as an MP in my nation's defence) was a sport for sissies either. We
    parted a great pals.

    Henry.

    "Keith Sheppard" <> wrote in message
    news:X7F_b.3955$...
    > I'm not quite sure what this has to do with digital photography but, for
    > what it's worth, anyone who thinks badminton is "sissy" has clearly never
    > played the sport. It is a faster game and requires far more sustained
    > physical energy than tennis. I cannot comment on raquetball because I

    have
    > never played it.
    >
    > A final point which will hopefully dispel any notions that badminton is of
    > no attraction to the red blooded male: can you name any other sport in

    which
    > the standard mixed doubles formation requires the lady to don a short

    skirt,
    > stand in front of her male partner and then bend over? I rest my case.
    >
    > Keith
    >
    >
     
    Henry Hooray, Feb 24, 2004
    #12
  13. Willian Penn

    A Reys Guest

    "Alan D-W" <> wrote in message
    news:403bcca9$0$10342$...
    >
    > "A Reys" <> wrote in message
    > news:OwP_b.2185$...
    > >
    > > Warning: Too Long-ish
    > >
    > > The most masculine? How do you define that? If you're simply looking at

    > how
    >
    > Yawn. Wake me up when you've finished


    Hey, wake up, asshole! That good enough?

    PS: Your reply was HI-llarious. What'd you spend on adding in the "Too,"
    3...4 hours?
     
    A Reys, Feb 25, 2004
    #13
  14. >>He said he had always thought badminton was a sissy game, but he certainly
    didn't think so anymore.

    I've never really worked out where this notion comes from. The only
    justification I can think of is that the thing you hit has feathers on it
    (also true of some forms of hunting, but let's not go into that), and that
    ladies sometimes wear things with feathers on. By the same token, I would
    therefore presume using a diamond tipped glass cutter is also "sissy"
    (whatever that means).

    Keith
     
    Keith Sheppard, Feb 25, 2004
    #14
  15. Willian Penn

    Henry Hooray Guest

    Perhaps if you imagine the ladies in their Victorian garb back at Badminton
    House in Wiltshire swishing and swashing their rackets about in the air ...

    Actually, let's not go there - could be a bit off topic :eek:)

    Henry.

    "Keith Sheppard" <> wrote in message
    news:ra__b.9$...
    > >>He said he had always thought badminton was a sissy game, but he

    certainly
    > didn't think so anymore.
    >
    > I've never really worked out where this notion comes from. The only
    > justification I can think of is that the thing you hit has feathers on it
    > (also true of some forms of hunting, but let's not go into that), and that
    > ladies sometimes wear things with feathers on. By the same token, I would
    > therefore presume using a diamond tipped glass cutter is also "sissy"
    > (whatever that means).
    >
    > Keith
    >
    >
     
    Henry Hooray, Feb 25, 2004
    #15
  16. Willian Penn

    tjsimeone Guest

    Just a relatively quick point about racquetball, which is the only one
    of these three sports that I now play regularly, although I have
    played the others in the past . . .

    I think it's a fundamental (though common) misapprehension that
    racquetball, at a high level, is just a "just a 'hit it as low as you
    can' game," as A Reys says below. In fact, that is just racquetball
    at a not-so-high level.

    I play racquetball at the Open level, currently ranked something like
    17th in the country in the 30+ division. (I certainly would not
    claim, however, to be the 17th-best 30+ player in the country --
    rankings are partly a matter of accumulating tournament points.) But
    still, I am familiar with the game at a high level.

    I am not, however, a particularly hard hitter, or a very good "pure"
    shooter -- I don't, compared to my peers, "hit it low" very well. But
    yet I am relatively successful. Why? Because, as in most sports,
    much of racquetball is mental -- and, in fact, there is far more to
    think about in racquetball than in most sports. Notably, the two
    professional racquetball players to spend the most time ranked #1 over
    the last couple of years (Jason Mannino and Jack Huczek) are both
    "control" players who generally favor lobs and passes over kill shots
    -- although, like all pros, they can certainly shoot the ball.

    So what is there to think about? Consider the serve: Pro and Open
    players only get one serve -- unlike in tennis -- so many players use
    lob serves, which one can more reliably get "in." I use both "drive"
    and "lob" serves, and, at a conservative estimate, I regularly use
    something like 15 very different-looking serves. Straight drive
    serves, "jam" serves, "Z" serves, high lobs and half lobs, "nick"
    lobs, overhand serves, and combinations of them. Good serve
    selections make the difference in many matches.

    Then there's shot selection: From, say, 3/4 deep in the court toward
    the side wall, an advanced player has many shots to choose from --
    down the line pass, cross-court, wide-angle pass, pinch or splat,
    cross-court corner kill, ceiling ball, "around-the world" ball,
    straight-in kill, etc. And in the Open division, the choice among
    them generally must be made very quickly , since the ball travels as
    fast as 180 mph, and maintains speeds over 100 mph even as it rebounds
    off the front wall. (By comparison, the serves of even the hardest
    servers in tennis slow to well below 100 mph once they bounce.) In my
    view, the most important aspect of racquetball, at a genuinely
    advanced level, is not hitting the ball hard and low, but making good
    shot selections. I regularly beat players who are far better shooters
    -- although I also regularly lose to some who are better shooters and
    make good shot selections.

    Retrieving the ball well is, of course, also as important as shooting
    well: Pro players routinely dive several times in a rally -- if you
    maintain good court position and are willing to dive, almost any ball
    is retrievable. I am certainly not at the level of the pros when it
    comes to diving, but it would still be unusual for me to play a
    serious match without diving 5 or 10 times. And the dive is just the
    last resort. Good court position and anticipation are far more
    important. Advanced players frequently return shots that look
    unreturnable because they knew what was coming.

    Taking all of these things together, I find racquetball to be more
    mentally stimulating than tennis or squash (where serve and shot
    selections are limited), although I find squash (again, at a high
    level) to be a tougher workout (the rallies are far longer -- rallies
    of 100 shots are not unknown at the highest levels). Mentally, the
    closest sport to racquetball, in my opinion, is table tennis (which I
    played competitively in college), where the element of spin
    complicates the game enormously (far more than in tennis, because the
    effects of spin on the ball are far more dramatic).

    Anyway, just my two (more like five, really) cents worth on why
    "hitting the ball low" really isn't what racquetball is about.--tjs

















    "A Reys" <> wrote in message news:<OwP_b.2185$>...
    > "Willian Penn" <> wrote in message
    > news:-nm.com...
    > > Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    > >
    > > Tennis (my vote)
    > > Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    > > Badminton (sissy)

    >
    > Warning: Long-ish
    >
    > The most masculine? How do you define that? If you're simply looking at how
    > physically demanding the three are, badminton wins hands down. The average
    > career span of a modern-day professional mens singles player is around 2
    > years because their bodies can't take the constant strain and begin to break
    > down.
    >
    > Of the three, racquetball is more of a power game (I mean, at a certain
    > skill level you can launch kill shots from anywhere on the court that will
    > bounce twice within 5 feet of the main wall) but lacks depth. To be sure,
    > it's immense fun and requires extremely good movement skills, but once you
    > hit a specific point it's just a "hit it as low as you can" game. The great
    > thing about racquetball is that it's very easy to get into. There's no net,
    > there are no boundaries that you have to keep the ball away from (serve
    > excluded) and it's just plain fun to be able to smack each shot as hard as
    > you can.
    >
    > Tennis and badminton both require nearly identical mental and creative
    > abilities. Both are very deep in terms of both strategy and their respective
    > physical aspects. Aside from this the games play totally differently. Tennis
    > uses a bigger court, but since the ball doesn't fly at anywhere near
    > shuttlecock speeds, it allows a much greater margin for error. Exhaustion in
    > tennis often comes more from hittnig shots than getting to them. Returning a
    > serve or hard ground stroke will take more out of you than taking the
    > necessary 5 steps to get into position.
    >
    > Badminton, on the other hand, will kill you just getting to the shot. If
    > you've ever seen a professional badminton match, those guys seem to teleport
    > around the court, and if you've ever played at a competitive level you can
    > relate to just how hard it IS vs how easy it SEEMS to move like they do. It
    > doesn't require the same kind of upper body strength as tennis or
    > racquetball, focusing more on technique (yah I've met 13 year old girls that
    > smash harder than me :-( ), but it requires quick feet (no matter what kind
    > of shape you're in, it doesn't matter if you can run a 4 minute mile, if you
    > can't move your feet quickly and change direction and momentum in a fraction
    > of a second, you will never do well in competitive badminton) and absolutely
    > insane reflexes. Let me emphasize that: *INSANE* reflexes. In-bloody-sane.
    > Especially in doubles. Unlike tennis, singles badminton is often more of a
    > finesse game while doubles badminton focuses on smashes/drives to score
    > points since it's tough to finesse your way around two people on such a
    > small court.
    >
    > Ok enough essay writing for now, heh. Final verdict: badminton > tennis >
    > racquetball on a purely technicaly/physical level. Aside from that, it's
    > just what you enjoy more (which for me breaks down identically to the
    > technical scale).
    >
    > Also the whole
    > mixed-doubles-partner-wearing-a-short-skirt-and-bending-over-in-front-of-you
    > part is nice :)
    >
    > AReys
     
    tjsimeone, Feb 25, 2004
    #16
  17. Willian Penn

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Willian Penn <> wrote:
    >Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    >
    >Tennis (my vote)
    >Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    >Badminton (sissy)


    Real men don't give a shit. They play what they enjoy.

    --
    Ray Fischer
     
    Ray Fischer, Feb 28, 2004
    #17
  18. Willian Penn

    Henry Hooray Guest

    Well said indeed!

    Henry.

    "Ray Fischer" <> wrote in message
    news:c1qoit$lqo$...
    > Willian Penn <> wrote:
    > >Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    > >
    > >Tennis (my vote)
    > >Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    > >Badminton (sissy)

    >
    > Real men don't give a shit. They play what they enjoy.
    >
    > --
    > Ray Fischer
    >
    >
     
    Henry Hooray, Feb 28, 2004
    #18
  19. Willian Penn

    Paolo Pizzi Guest

    Ray Fischer wrote:
    > Willian Penn <> wrote:
    >> Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    >>
    >> Tennis (my vote)
    >> Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    >> Badminton (sissy)

    >
    > Real men don't give a shit. They play what they enjoy.


    Real men play chess. ;-)
     
    Paolo Pizzi, Feb 28, 2004
    #19
  20. "Ray Fischer" <> wrote in message
    news:c1qoit$lqo$...
    > Willian Penn <> wrote:
    > >Of the following three sports, which is the most masculine:
    > >
    > >Tennis (my vote)
    > >Raquetball (unisex, corporate)
    > >Badminton (sissy)

    >
    > Real men don't give a shit. They play what they enjoy.
    >

    Right! - I'm a ping-pong man myself. Also, the three games require
    different amounts of space and money to own courts....Badminton courts are
    relatively cheap, and anyone with a reasonably medium sized back yard and
    not too much wind can build one. The other two games require playing at a
    club and/or a very expensive home.
     
    William Graham, Feb 29, 2004
    #20
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