Ten reasons to choose a Digital SLR over a Point and Shoot

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=, Nov 16, 2007.

  1. Ten reasons to choose a Digital SLR over a Point and Shoot

    1. You shoot in low light.

    Modern digital SLRs are able to produce low noise images at ISO speeds
    up to 1600, depending on the camera. Point and shoot cameras, with their
    small sensors, begin to exhibit noise at ISO 200, with some poorer
    models being too noisy even at 100 ISO.

    2. You want to use flash attachments.

    While a few higher end point and shoot digital models have hot shoes for
    an external flash, most do not. Some Canon P&S models without hot shoes
    can use a wireless flash, but it's not a great flash unit.

    3. You need a wide-angle lens.

    Digital SLRs have super-wide-angle zoom lenses available with an
    effective focal length of as little as 16mm. There are no point and
    shoot digital cameras with lenses that wide.

    4. You need a long telephoto lens.

    Whether it’s doing wildlife photography in Alaska, or shooting at
    sporting events, only a digital SLR can use long telephoto lenses. If
    you only need a specialty lens for rare occasions, you can even rent one
    for a couple of days.

    5. You need fast auto-focus.

    Most digital SLRs (with the exception of Pentax) use lenses with
    internal high-speed focusing motors). Point and shoot digital cameras
    cannot focus nearly as fast.

    6. You need low shutter lag.

    Whether it’s photographing your child on a merry-go-round, or capturing
    the crack of the bat against the baseball, you cannot obtain these shots
    with a digital point and shoot camera because the time between when you
    press the shutter and the image is captured is far too long.

    7. You want to produce images that can be printed in large sizes.

    Only a high-resolution digital SLR is suitable for poster size prints.

    8. You want an optical viewfinder.

    While a few point and shoot cameras have retained an optical viewfinder,
    it’s been cost-reduced out of most models. Composing a picture on the
    LCD screen, in bright sunlight, is very difficult.

    9. You want full manual control.

    While some high-end point and shoot models have retained some level of
    manual control, most have cost-reduced it out. On some Canon models,
    there is third-party software that can get some of the manual control back.

    10. Expandability and upgradability.

    Not only a wide variety of specialty lenses, but flash attachments,
    filters, vertical grips, remote shutter releases, etc. If you eventually
    want to upgrade to a better D-SLR body, a lot of the lenses and
    accessories can be used on the new body if it’s from the same manufacturer.
     
    =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=, Nov 16, 2007
    #1
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  2. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    John Bean Guest

    On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 14:07:03 -0800, SMS ???• ?
    <> wrote:

    >Ten reasons to choose a Digital SLR over a Point and Shoot


    [...]

    Plus:

    11. It fits in your pocket

    Oops... perhaps that should be added to the "Ten reasons to
    choose a Point and Shoot over a Digital SLR" thread that
    hasn't yet appeared.

    What a pointless load of nonsense.


    --
    John Bean
     
    John Bean, Nov 16, 2007
    #2
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  3. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    Ali Guest

    SMS-san

    You forgot to mention the availability of big aperture, sharp, prime lenses.
    Also, some DSLR lenses go less than 16mm, although I assume you mean 35mm
    equivalent focal length.

    I would like to know why all DSLR's don't have 100% optical viewfinders. I
    would also like to know why camera manufacturers don't have aperture
    bracketing (for DOF), which is nothing more than firmware? Camera
    manufactures have used exposure bracketing for a long time, but for some
    strange reason don't want to provide aperture bracketing.



    "SMS 斯蒂文• å¤" <> wrote in message
    news:473e141a$0$79880$...
    > Ten reasons to choose a Digital SLR over a Point and Shoot
    >
    > 1. You shoot in low light.
    >
    > Modern digital SLRs are able to produce low noise images at ISO speeds up
    > to 1600, depending on the camera. Point and shoot cameras, with their
    > small sensors, begin to exhibit noise at ISO 200, with some poorer models
    > being too noisy even at 100 ISO.
    >
    > 2. You want to use flash attachments.
    >
    > While a few higher end point and shoot digital models have hot shoes for
    > an external flash, most do not. Some Canon P&S models without hot shoes
    > can use a wireless flash, but it's not a great flash unit.
    >
    > 3. You need a wide-angle lens.
    >
    > Digital SLRs have super-wide-angle zoom lenses available with an effective
    > focal length of as little as 16mm. There are no point and shoot digital
    > cameras with lenses that wide.
    >
    > 4. You need a long telephoto lens.
    >
    > Whether it’s doing wildlife photography in Alaska, or shooting at sporting
    > events, only a digital SLR can use long telephoto lenses. If you only need
    > a specialty lens for rare occasions, you can even rent one for a couple of
    > days.
    >
    > 5. You need fast auto-focus.
    >
    > Most digital SLRs (with the exception of Pentax) use lenses with internal
    > high-speed focusing motors). Point and shoot digital cameras cannot focus
    > nearly as fast.
    >
    > 6. You need low shutter lag.
    >
    > Whether it’s photographing your child on a merry-go-round, or capturing
    > the crack of the bat against the baseball, you cannot obtain these shots
    > with a digital point and shoot camera because the time between when you
    > press the shutter and the image is captured is far too long.
    >
    > 7. You want to produce images that can be printed in large sizes.
    >
    > Only a high-resolution digital SLR is suitable for poster size prints.
    >
    > 8. You want an optical viewfinder.
    >
    > While a few point and shoot cameras have retained an optical viewfinder,
    > it’s been cost-reduced out of most models. Composing a picture on the LCD
    > screen, in bright sunlight, is very difficult.
    >
    > 9. You want full manual control.
    >
    > While some high-end point and shoot models have retained some level of
    > manual control, most have cost-reduced it out. On some Canon models, there
    > is third-party software that can get some of the manual control back.
    >
    > 10. Expandability and upgradability.
    >
    > Not only a wide variety of specialty lenses, but flash attachments,
    > filters, vertical grips, remote shutter releases, etc. If you eventually
    > want to upgrade to a better D-SLR body, a lot of the lenses and
    > accessories can be used on the new body if it’s from the same
    > manufacturer.
     
    Ali, Nov 16, 2007
    #3
  4. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    nospam Guest

    In article <473e141a$0$79880$>, SMS ÊñØËíÇÊñá’Ä¢
    夏 <> wrote:

    > 2. You want to use flash attachments.
    >
    > While a few higher end point and shoot digital models have hot shoes for
    > an external flash, most do not. Some Canon P&S models without hot shoes
    > can use a wireless flash, but it's not a great flash unit.


    if there is no hotshoe or flash sync socket, then as little as $10 will
    buy a flash slave (and some of the slaves handle pre-flashes).

    > 3. You need a wide-angle lens.
    >
    > Digital SLRs have super-wide-angle zoom lenses available with an
    > effective focal length of as little as 16mm. There are no point and
    > shoot digital cameras with lenses that wide.


    there are wide angle attachments and nikon even makes a fisheye
    attachment for the coolpix cameras.

    <http://nikonimaging.com/global/products/accessory/converter/fc-e9/index.
    htm>

    > 4. You need a long telephoto lens.
    >
    > Whether it’s doing wildlife photography in Alaska, or shooting at
    > sporting events, only a digital SLR can use long telephoto lenses. If
    > you only need a specialty lens for rare occasions, you can even rent one
    > for a couple of days.


    there are telephoto attachments and some cameras have fairly long range
    zooms without any adapter.

    > 5. You need fast auto-focus.
    >
    > Most digital SLRs (with the exception of Pentax) use lenses with
    > internal high-speed focusing motors). Point and shoot digital cameras
    > cannot focus nearly as fast.


    pentax is not anywhere near as slow as you make it out to be, nor is
    screw coupling in general.

    > 6. You need low shutter lag.
    >
    > Whether it’s photographing your child on a merry-go-round, or capturing
    > the crack of the bat against the baseball, you cannot obtain these shots
    > with a digital point and shoot camera because the time between when you
    > press the shutter and the image is captured is far too long.


    shutter lag can be minimized with careful pre-focus/preset exposure.
    however, that is not ideal in all situations.

    > 7. You want to produce images that can be printed in large sizes.


    you mean like the billboard in times square from a 3 megapixel coolpix
    990? so much for not being able to make large prints.

    > Only a high-resolution digital SLR is suitable for poster size prints.


    it depends on viewing distance, among other things.

    > 8. You want an optical viewfinder.
    >
    > While a few point and shoot cameras have retained an optical viewfinder,
    > it’s been cost-reduced out of most models. Composing a picture on the
    > LCD screen, in bright sunlight, is very difficult.


    not always. and if it is a problem, there are lcd shades that are
    quite cheap (plus just using a hand to shadow it works).

    > 9. You want full manual control.
    >
    > While some high-end point and shoot models have retained some level of
    > manual control, most have cost-reduced it out. On some Canon models,
    > there is third-party software that can get some of the manual control back.


    a lot of p&s cameras have manual control.

    > 10. Expandability and upgradability.
    >
    > Not only a wide variety of specialty lenses, but flash attachments,
    > filters, vertical grips, remote shutter releases, etc. If you eventually
    > want to upgrade to a better D-SLR body, a lot of the lenses and
    > accessories can be used on the new body if it’s from the same manufacturer.


    what is it with you and vertical grips? someone who buys a p&s camera
    is NOT interested in bloating it up with a vertical grip. that
    basically defeats the size advantage of a p&s. nevertheless, if you
    insist on a vertical grip, nikon (and maybe others) have one for some
    of their models, such as the 8700.

    <http://a.img-dpreview.com/reviews/NikonCP8700/Images/Accessories/mb-e57
    00.jpg>

    also, many p&s cameras have filter threads and they can be controlled
    by the usb port (or serial port for the older models). nikon even made
    a filter kit, remote control with intervalometer and a ring flash for
    the coolpix cameras:

    <http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/NikonCP8700/page4.asp>
    <http://www.steves-digicams.com/2002_reviews/nikon4500/4500_sl-1.jpg>
     
    nospam, Nov 16, 2007
    #4
  5. Sigh... the idiot needs to be corrected again. This is the problem with armchair
    photographers who only use the internet for all their photography and
    experience. They'll keep posting this crap forever because it's all they ever do
    and can do, they don't have a camera.



    On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 14:07:03 -0800, SMS ???• ? <>
    wrote:

    >Ten reasons to choose a Digital SLR over a Point and Shoot
    >
    >1. You shoot in low light.
    >
    >Modern digital SLRs are able to produce low noise images at ISO speeds
    >up to 1600, depending on the camera. Point and shoot cameras, with their
    >small sensors, begin to exhibit noise at ISO 200, with some poorer
    >models being too noisy even at 100 ISO.
    >


    Not needed when your long-zoom lenses have apertures large enough to use slower
    shutter speeds. dSLR's NEED those high ISOs to make them functional.



    >2. You want to use flash attachments.
    >
    >While a few higher end point and shoot digital models have hot shoes for
    >an external flash, most do not. Some Canon P&S models without hot shoes
    >can use a wireless flash, but it's not a great flash unit.
    >


    Every camera can use a slave flash, or slave-trigger for any existing flash, or
    use its built-in hotshoe. Do a little more research to find out just how many
    P&S cameras, even some ultra-compacts, have external flash capability.


    >3. You need a wide-angle lens.
    >
    >Digital SLRs have super-wide-angle zoom lenses available with an
    >effective focal length of as little as 16mm. There are no point and
    >shoot digital cameras with lenses that wide.
    >


    While you have a whole bag of lenses to accomplish this, only one accessory lens
    is needed for a P&S camera to attain even greater wide-angle ranges than you can
    get with your dSLR.


    >4. You need a long telephoto lens.
    >
    >Whether it’s doing wildlife photography in Alaska, or shooting at
    >sporting events, only a digital SLR can use long telephoto lenses. If
    >you only need a specialty lens for rare occasions, you can even rent one
    >for a couple of days.
    >


    Odd, my P&S camera with the right tele-converter has all the reach I have ever
    needed for wildlife photography. That's my primary use for any camera. If you
    have to go out of your way to rent a long-zoom lens for your camera isn't that
    telling you something? Quite a few things actually. An important one being that
    you can't even afford what I can easily carry in my pocket.


    >5. You need fast auto-focus.
    >
    >Most digital SLRs (with the exception of Pentax) use lenses with
    >internal high-speed focusing motors). Point and shoot digital cameras
    >cannot focus nearly as fast.


    If you are a photographer with any REAL experience, this isn't any real issue.
    REAL photographers know all about hyperfocal distances and the advantages of
    using manual focus presets on their cameras. This is particularly true in
    high-speed situations where anyone depending on auto-focus only reveals their
    inability to be a photographer, they will miss most of the shots. Because no
    matter how fast you think your camera is at focusing, it's still not going to be
    fast enough.

    >
    >6. You need low shutter lag.
    >
    >Whether it’s photographing your child on a merry-go-round, or capturing
    >the crack of the bat against the baseball, you cannot obtain these shots
    >with a digital point and shoot camera because the time between when you
    >press the shutter and the image is captured is far too long.


    You need to get away from your keyboard and at least browse a few camera
    stores. Shutter lag is near non-existent on many of the newer ones. My latest
    P&S camera has a shutter lag of 0.05 seconds.

    >
    >7. You want to produce images that can be printed in large sizes.
    >
    >Only a high-resolution digital SLR is suitable for poster size prints.


    Print size is a function of the number of available pixels. Almost all P&S
    cameras these days have the same amount of pixels as dSLRs.


    >
    >8. You want an optical viewfinder.
    >
    >While a few point and shoot cameras have retained an optical viewfinder,
    >it’s been cost-reduced out of most models. Composing a picture on the
    >LCD screen, in bright sunlight, is very difficult.
    >


    No, I specifically don't want an optical viewfinder. I've lived with them most
    of my life and I'm glad to be rid of them. They are never 100% accurate for
    framing, they are dimmer in low-light conditions than using the electronically
    amplified scene in an EVF, any stray light entering from the back will ruin any
    exposure readings, and they don't show real-time shutter-speed effects as I
    change my shutter speed. An EVF also doesn't dim down to unusable conditions
    when I need to do a DOF preview. The DOF preview is active all the time. I'm so
    glad that dSLRs have to retain the ancient optical viewfinder, it shows just how
    poor they are in form and function.

    >9. You want full manual control.
    >
    >While some high-end point and shoot models have retained some level of
    >manual control, most have cost-reduced it out. On some Canon models,
    >there is third-party software that can get some of the manual control back.
    >


    All the better P&S cameras come with full manual controls. Some so advanced that
    even $20,000 dSLRs don't have them. One only needs to research what's available
    on any CHDK-compatible camera to see this.

    >10. Expandability and upgradability.
    >
    >Not only a wide variety of specialty lenses, but flash attachments,
    >filters, vertical grips, remote shutter releases, etc. If you eventually
    >want to upgrade to a better D-SLR body, a lot of the lenses and
    >accessories can be used on the new body if it’s from the same manufacturer.


    Yes, you need that, because your one camera can't do it all. My P&S cameras can.
     
    Misinformation Corrector, Nov 16, 2007
    #5
  6. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    Ali Guest

    Bear with it. He has made some good comments.

    I don't want to p*ss you off, but he has made a much more meaningful post
    than yours. Afterall, his post has some meaning, whereas your post has
    absolutely nothing. At least try to give a good argument for why he is
    wrong, if you feel that way.




    "Misinformation Corrector" <> wrote in message

    > Sigh... the idiot needs to be corrected again. This is the problem with
    > armchair
    > photographers who only use the internet for all their photography and
    > experience. They'll keep posting this crap forever because it's all they
    > ever do
    > and can do, they don't have a camera.
     
    Ali, Nov 16, 2007
    #6
  7. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    newshound Guest

    It's horses for courses. A pro sports photographer is going to use a DSLR. I
    carry a P&S almost everywhere; it's hard to be inconspicuous using a DSLR.
     
    newshound, Nov 16, 2007
    #7
  8. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    Ali Guest

    Yes, of course.

    Just out of interest, what are you photographing for the need to be
    inconspicuous?


    "newshound" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > It's horses for courses. A pro sports photographer is going to use a DSLR.
    > I carry a P&S almost everywhere; it's hard to be inconspicuous using a
    > DSLR.
    >
     
    Ali, Nov 16, 2007
    #8
  9. Ali wrote:
    > SMS-san
    >
    > You forgot to mention the availability of big aperture, sharp, prime
    > lenses.


    Okay, that's number 11.

    > Also, some DSLR lenses go less than 16mm, although I assume you
    > mean 35mm equivalent focal length.


    Yes, I was correcting for the crop factor. Even so, you can go less than
    16mm, even correcting for the crop factor, with the fish eye lenses that
    go done to 8mm (uncorrected for crop factor).

    > I would like to know why all DSLR's don't have 100% optical
    > viewfinders. I would also like to know why camera manufacturers don't
    > have aperture bracketing (for DOF), which is nothing more than
    > firmware? Camera manufactures have used exposure bracketing for a long
    > time, but for some strange reason don't want to provide aperture
    > bracketing.


    That's a good question. It would be easy to implement. Maybe they figure
    not enough users are interested. Firmware isn't free, there's a
    development cost. Still it would be a marketing bullet to be able to
    boast about it.
     
    =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=, Nov 16, 2007
    #9
  10. newshound wrote:
    > It's horses for courses. A pro sports photographer is going to use a DSLR. I
    > carry a P&S almost everywhere; it's hard to be inconspicuous using a DSLR.


    Sometimes you _want_ to be conspicuous.

    Two years ago I was really getting upset over how people were driving
    near my son's school. I started carrying my D-SLR with me, and taking
    photos of them driving through crosswalks without stopping, etc. It got
    to the point where just raising the camera to my face and aiming it at
    their car would get them to behave, whereas using a small P&S or a
    camera phone would have no effect. I got yelled at by some of them that
    were upset about being photographed. I had tried using a P&S, but I
    needed very low shutter lag. See "http://nordicgroup.us/dtshos/" Before
    the dummy corp goes non-linear, note that I was using a long zoom for
    many of these shots, and I reduced the resolution for the web site so
    they will load faster.
     
    =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=, Nov 16, 2007
    #10
  11. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    acl Guest

    On Nov 17, 2:15 am, "newshound" <> wrote:
    > It's horses for courses. A pro sports photographer is going to use a DSLR. I
    > carry a P&S almost everywhere; it's hard to be inconspicuous using a DSLR.


    Another approach to becoming inconspicuous, at least in a smallish
    town, is the following: carry a large camera, preferably with lenses,
    all the time; randomly stop and take photographs, making sure to be
    highly visible while doing so. Eventually, more and more people will
    just say "oh, it's that weirdo with the camera again" when they spot
    you, and then just ignore you.

    Works for me :)
     
    acl, Nov 17, 2007
    #11
  12. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    Guest

    On Nov 16, 3:48 pm, Misinformation Corrector <>
    wrote:
    > Sigh... the idiot needs to be corrected again. This is the problem with armchair
    > photographers who only use the internet for all their photography and
    > experience. They'll keep posting this crap forever because it's all they ever do
    > and can do, they don't have a camera.
    >
    > On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 14:07:03 -0800, SMS ???* ? <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Ten reasons to choose a Digital SLR over a Point and Shoot

    >
    > >1. You shoot in low light.

    >
    > >Modern digital SLRs are able to produce low noise images at ISO speeds
    > >up to 1600, depending on the camera. Point and shoot cameras, with their
    > >small sensors, begin to exhibit noise at ISO 200, with some poorer
    > >models being too noisy even at 100 ISO.

    >
    > Not needed when your long-zoom lenses have apertures large enough to use slower
    > shutter speeds. dSLR's NEED those high ISOs to make them functional.
    >
    > >2. You want to use flash attachments.

    >
    > >While a few higher end point and shoot digital models have hot shoes for
    > >an external flash, most do not. Some Canon P&S models without hot shoes
    > >can use a wireless flash, but it's not a great flash unit.

    >
    > Every camera can use a slave flash, or slave-trigger for any existing flash, or
    > use its built-in hotshoe. Do a little more research to find out just how many
    > P&S cameras, even some ultra-compacts, have external flash capability.
    >
    > >3. You need a wide-angle lens.

    >
    > >Digital SLRs have super-wide-angle zoom lenses available with an
    > >effective focal length of as little as 16mm. There are no point and
    > >shoot digital cameras with lenses that wide.

    >
    > While you have a whole bag of lenses to accomplish this, only one accessory lens
    > is needed for a P&S camera to attain even greater wide-angle ranges than you can
    > get with your dSLR.
    >
    > >4. You need a long telephoto lens.

    >
    > >Whether it's doing wildlife photography in Alaska, or shooting at
    > >sporting events, only a digital SLR can use long telephoto lenses. If
    > >you only need a specialty lens for rare occasions, you can even rent one
    > >for a couple of days.

    >
    > Odd, my P&S camera with the right tele-converter has all the reach I have ever
    > needed for wildlife photography. That's my primary use for any camera. If you
    > have to go out of your way to rent a long-zoom lens for your camera isn't that
    > telling you something? Quite a few things actually. An important one being that
    > you can't even afford what I can easily carry in my pocket.
    >
    > >5. You need fast auto-focus.

    >
    > >Most digital SLRs (with the exception of Pentax) use lenses with
    > >internal high-speed focusing motors). Point and shoot digital cameras
    > >cannot focus nearly as fast.

    >
    > If you are a photographer with any REAL experience, this isn't any real issue.
    > REAL photographers know all about hyperfocal distances and the advantages of
    > using manual focus presets on their cameras. This is particularly true in
    > high-speed situations where anyone depending on auto-focus only reveals their
    > inability to be a photographer, they will miss most of the shots. Because no
    > matter how fast you think your camera is at focusing, it's still not going to be
    > fast enough.
    >
    >
    >
    > >6. You need low shutter lag.

    >
    > >Whether it's photographing your child on a merry-go-round, or capturing
    > >the crack of the bat against the baseball, you cannot obtain these shots
    > >with a digital point and shoot camera because the time between when you
    > >press the shutter and the image is captured is far too long.

    >
    > You need to get away from your keyboard and at least browse a few camera
    > stores. Shutter lag is near non-existent on many of the newer ones. My latest
    > P&S camera has a shutter lag of 0.05 seconds.
    >
    >
    >
    > >7. You want to produce images that can be printed in large sizes.

    >
    > >Only a high-resolution digital SLR is suitable for poster size prints.

    >
    > Print size is a function of the number of available pixels. Almost all P&S
    > cameras these days have the same amount of pixels as dSLRs.
    >
    >
    >
    > >8. You want an optical viewfinder.

    >
    > >While a few point and shoot cameras have retained an optical viewfinder,
    > >it's been cost-reduced out of most models. Composing a picture on the
    > >LCD screen, in bright sunlight, is very difficult.

    >
    > No, I specifically don't want an optical viewfinder. I've lived with them most
    > of my life and I'm glad to be rid of them. They are never 100% accurate for
    > framing, they are dimmer in low-light conditions than using the electronically
    > amplified scene in an EVF, any stray light entering from the back will ruin any
    > exposure readings, and they don't show real-time shutter-speed effects as I
    > change my shutter speed. An EVF also doesn't dim down to unusable conditions
    > when I need to do a DOF preview. The DOF preview is active all the time. I'm so
    > glad that dSLRs have to retain the ancient optical viewfinder, it shows just how
    > poor they are in form and function.
    >


    I have to chime in on this point:

    I have NEVER taken a photo with my
    Powershot G3 by looking throug the optical
    viewfinder. Every pic was taken looking
    at the LCD viewer. It gives you a MUCH better
    idea of what you will actually capture.

    I decided on the Canon 40D instead of
    the Canon 400D, in large part because the more
    expensive 40D has the "Live View" feature!

    I will miss the rotatable and angle-adjustable
    screen of my G3, because it's an AWESOME way
    to take pics over the heads of crowds of people, or
    to take "snail's-eye" view pics, without lying on the
    ground.
     
    , Nov 17, 2007
    #12
  13. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    Mr. Strat Guest

    In article
    <>,
    <> wrote:

    > I have NEVER taken a photo with my
    > Powershot G3 by looking throug the optical
    > viewfinder. Every pic was taken looking
    > at the LCD viewer. It gives you a MUCH better
    > idea of what you will actually capture.


    Loser!

    > I decided on the Canon 40D instead of
    > the Canon 400D, in large part because the more
    > expensive 40D has the "Live View" feature!


    Loser again!
     
    Mr. Strat, Nov 17, 2007
    #13
  14. Misinformation Corrector wrote:
    [snip-snap]

    Dear Misinformation

    Finally you have found an appropriate name for yourself.
    May I suggest you stick with it?

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Nov 17, 2007
    #14
  15. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    Guest

    You forget one of the biggest reasons.

    You can impress everyone. This seems to be the thinking of many, not
    all. How often have you had a discussion about digital photography
    with a DSLR owner only to find out he doesn't really even know how
    to take advantage of it's attributes. A point and shoot would be just
    as useful in his hands........ Sure is impressive though.
     
    , Nov 17, 2007
    #15
  16. On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 15:44:08 -0800, SMS ???• ? <>
    wrote:

    >Ali wrote:
    >> SMS-san
    >>
    >> You forgot to mention the availability of big aperture, sharp, prime
    >> lenses.

    >
    >Okay, that's number 11.
    >
    >> Also, some DSLR lenses go less than 16mm, although I assume you
    >> mean 35mm equivalent focal length.

    >
    >Yes, I was correcting for the crop factor. Even so, you can go less than
    >16mm, even correcting for the crop factor, with the fish eye lenses that
    >go done to 8mm (uncorrected for crop factor).
    >
    >> I would like to know why all DSLR's don't have 100% optical
    >> viewfinders. I would also like to know why camera manufacturers don't
    >> have aperture bracketing (for DOF), which is nothing more than
    >> firmware? Camera manufactures have used exposure bracketing for a long
    >> time, but for some strange reason don't want to provide aperture
    >> bracketing.

    >
    >That's a good question. It would be easy to implement. Maybe they figure
    >not enough users are interested. Firmware isn't free, there's a
    >development cost. Still it would be a marketing bullet to be able to
    >boast about it.


    You're right, firmware upgrading isn't free, but it should be. However software
    to correct all the limitations with original firmware is most definitely free.

    http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK

    What a shame that you can't run that on your dSLRs. You could have your DOF,
    Aperture, Shutter Speed, EV, and even ISO bracketing if you so desired. To as
    many stops and frames as you needed for any subject. You could have all that
    capability in the next minute for FREE, if you weren't waiting to depend on a
    dSLR to do that for you.

    Enjoy your dSLR dedication. :)
     
    HaroldSpencer, Nov 17, 2007
    #16
  17. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    rwalker Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > You forget one of the biggest reasons.
    >
    > You can impress everyone. This seems to be the thinking of many, not
    > all. How often have you had a discussion about digital photography
    > with a DSLR owner only to find out he doesn't really even know how
    > to take advantage of it's attributes. A point and shoot would be just
    > as useful in his hands........ Sure is impressive though.


    You are a boring idiot. And you have a nasty case of small penis syndrome.
     
    rwalker, Nov 17, 2007
    #17
  18. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    Prometheus Guest

    In article <g%o%i.14488$>, Ali
    <> writes
    >
    >"SMS ???• ?" <> wrote in message
    >news:473e141a$0$79880$...
    >> Ten reasons to choose a Digital SLR over a Point and Shoot
    >>
    >> 1. You shoot in low light.
    >>
    >> Modern digital SLRs are able to produce low noise images at ISO
    >>speeds up to 1600, depending on the camera. Point and shoot cameras,
    >>with their small sensors, begin to exhibit noise at ISO 200, with
    >>some poorer models being too noisy even at 100 ISO.
    >>
    >> 2. You want to use flash attachments.
    >>
    >> While a few higher end point and shoot digital models have hot shoes
    >>for an external flash, most do not. Some Canon P&S models without hot
    >>shoes can use a wireless flash, but it's not a great flash unit.
    >>
    >> 3. You need a wide-angle lens.
    >>
    >> Digital SLRs have super-wide-angle zoom lenses available with an
    >>effective focal length of as little as 16mm. There are no point and
    >>shoot digital cameras with lenses that wide.
    >>
    >> 4. You need a long telephoto lens.
    >>
    >> Whether it’s doing wildlife photography in Alaska, or shooting at
    >>sporting events, only a digital SLR can use long telephoto lenses. If
    >>you only need a specialty lens for rare occasions, you can even rent
    >>one for a couple of days.
    >>
    >> 5. You need fast auto-focus.
    >>
    >> Most digital SLRs (with the exception of Pentax) use lenses with
    >>internal high-speed focusing motors). Point and shoot digital cameras
    >>cannot focus nearly as fast.
    >>
    >> 6. You need low shutter lag.
    >>
    >> Whether it’s photographing your child on a merry-go-round, or
    >>capturing the crack of the bat against the baseball, you cannot
    >>obtain these shots with a digital point and shoot camera because the
    >>time between when you press the shutter and the image is captured is
    >>far too long.
    >>
    >> 7. You want to produce images that can be printed in large sizes.
    >>
    >> Only a high-resolution digital SLR is suitable for poster size prints.
    >>
    >> 8. You want an optical viewfinder.
    >>
    >> While a few point and shoot cameras have retained an optical
    >>viewfinder, it’s been cost-reduced out of most models. Composing a
    >>picture on the LCD screen, in bright sunlight, is very difficult.
    >>
    >> 9. You want full manual control.
    >>
    >> While some high-end point and shoot models have retained some level
    >>of manual control, most have cost-reduced it out. On some Canon
    >>models, there is third-party software that can get some of the manual
    >>control back.
    >>
    >> 10. Expandability and upgradability.
    >>
    >> Not only a wide variety of specialty lenses, but flash attachments,
    >>filters, vertical grips, remote shutter releases, etc. If you
    >>eventually want to upgrade to a better D-SLR body, a lot of the
    >>lenses and accessories can be used on the new body if it’s from the
    >>same manufacturer.

    >
    >You forgot to mention the availability of big aperture, sharp, prime
    >lenses. Also, some DSLR lenses go less than 16mm, although I assume you
    >mean 35mm equivalent focal length.
    >
    >I would like to know why all DSLR's don't have 100% optical
    >viewfinders.


    The ones without are not reflex.

    >I would also like to know why camera manufacturers don't have aperture
    >bracketing (for DOF), which is nothing more than firmware?


    The nearest I have seen to this is Canon's A-DEP mode which selects an
    aperture to give the beet DoF for the scene.

    >Camera manufactures have used exposure bracketing for a long time, but
    >for some strange reason don't want to provide aperture bracketing.


    I am not quite sure of the advantage, if the object is to throw the
    uninteresting parts out of focus you will need to change the focus
    distance as well so that you can select the best effect.


    --
    Ian G8ILZ
    There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.
    ~Ansel Adams
     
    Prometheus, Nov 17, 2007
    #18
  19. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    Prometheus Guest

    In article <>, HaroldSpencer
    <> writes
    >On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 15:44:08 -0800, SMS ???• ? <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Ali wrote:
    >>> SMS-san
    >>>
    >>> You forgot to mention the availability of big aperture, sharp, prime
    >>> lenses.

    >>
    >>Okay, that's number 11.
    >>
    >>> Also, some DSLR lenses go less than 16mm, although I assume you
    >>> mean 35mm equivalent focal length.

    >>
    >>Yes, I was correcting for the crop factor. Even so, you can go less than
    >>16mm, even correcting for the crop factor, with the fish eye lenses that
    >>go done to 8mm (uncorrected for crop factor).
    >>
    >>> I would like to know why all DSLR's don't have 100% optical
    >>> viewfinders. I would also like to know why camera manufacturers don't
    >>> have aperture bracketing (for DOF), which is nothing more than
    >>> firmware? Camera manufactures have used exposure bracketing for a long
    >>> time, but for some strange reason don't want to provide aperture
    >>> bracketing.

    >>
    >>That's a good question. It would be easy to implement. Maybe they figure
    >>not enough users are interested. Firmware isn't free, there's a
    >>development cost. Still it would be a marketing bullet to be able to
    >>boast about it.

    >
    >You're right, firmware upgrading isn't free, but it should be.


    Are you going to work for free? Software doesn't write its self. The
    camera manufactures recoup the cost by sealing the hardware.

    --
    Ian G8ILZ
    There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.
    ~Ansel Adams
     
    Prometheus, Nov 17, 2007
    #19
  20. =?UTF-8?B?U01TIOaWr+iSguaWh+KAoiDlpI8=?=

    Prometheus Guest

    In article <>, newshound
    <> writes
    >It's horses for courses. A pro sports photographer is going to use a DSLR. I
    >carry a P&S almost everywhere; it's hard to be inconspicuous using a DSLR.


    At last some sense. I carry a P&S (Minolta Xt) almost everywhere and
    only take the DSLR when on holiday or visiting interesting events and
    places where I expect to take photographs. My P&S is not as good as the
    DSLR (although I do have a few landscapes taken in good light that are
    good), but it is better than no camera. In fact the camera in my phone
    is better than no camera (I would not bother to print its snaps), so
    make the P&S much better than no camera.

    --
    Ian G8ILZ
    There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.
    ~Ansel Adams
     
    Prometheus, Nov 17, 2007
    #20
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