Technical ignorance allows for some funny situations

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Jun 8, 2014.

  1. On 6/10/2014 1:40 PM, Martin Brown wrote:
    > On 10/06/2014 18:15, nospam wrote:
    >> In article <Vyylv.237450$4>, Martin Brown

    >
    >>> UFOs are much rarer now than they were at the height of the paranoid
    >>> Cold War era. Not least because orbital elements of known space objects
    >>> is widely available with predictions of the strartlingly bright Iridium
    >>> flares now very precise. And I bet most people have never seen one!

    >>
    >> the ufos might be rarer, but the loonies are in full force.

    >
    > If you haven't seen an Iridium flare put your lat & long into this
    > website and pick one that is -6 to -8 - they are startling.
    >
    > You have to be looking in the right place when they occur.
    >
    > http://heavens-above.com/
    >
    > Magnitude is a log scale. To put it into perspective a full moon is -13
    > ISS is usually between -2 and -3.5 (rare ideal conditions can be -6)
    >

    Being a reader of science fiction, I was once excited to look up from
    jammed traffic in Washington DC in the late 60's and see an echelon of
    pink discs going across the orange sunset sky. I only had to blink and
    refocus after a second or two to realize that they were Canada geese lit
    by the setting sun.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
    James Silverton, Jun 10, 2014
    #41
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  2. On 6/10/2014 2:12 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2014-06-10 17:15:17 +0000, nospam <> said:
    >
    >> In article <>, PeterN
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>> he claims homeopathic cures (which is nothing more than ordinary water)
    >>>> can cure anything.
    >>>
    >>> Not all homeopathic medicines are water.

    >>
    >> the majority are water and so highly diluted that there is not even 1
    >> molecule of the original substance.
    >>
    >> a little sugar might be added for taste but that's about it.
    >>
    >>> Some actually work. Some only
    >>> work because of the placebo effect. And others do not work at all.

    >>
    >> if they do anything at all, it's a complete coincidence.
    >>
    >> it's a complete scam.

    >
    > Homeopathy is all placebo. You might as well have a shaman dance around
    > you while shaking a rattle.
    >

    I've always liked the dilution to less than one molecule in a dose. I
    guess you have be lucky and get the molecule.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
    James Silverton, Jun 10, 2014
    #42
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  3. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/10/2014 4:37 PM, James Silverton wrote:

    <snip>

    >>

    > Being a reader of science fiction, I was once excited to look up from
    > jammed traffic in Washington DC in the late 60's and see an echelon of
    > pink discs going across the orange sunset sky. I only had to blink and
    > refocus after a second or two to realize that they were Canada geese lit
    > by the setting sun.
    >


    Better pink geese, than pink elephants in your mirror. ;-)

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 10, 2014
    #43
  4. RichA

    Martin Brown Guest

    On 10/06/2014 21:15, PeterN wrote:
    > On 6/10/2014 3:51 PM, nospam wrote:
    >> In article <>, PeterN
    >> <> wrote:


    >>> Here's what WebMD has to say about it.
    >>> <http://www.webmd.com/balance/guide/homeopathy-topic-overview>

    >>
    >> that doesn't say much of anything.
    >>

    > From the article:
    > "highly diluted or "potentiated" substances. There is some evidence to
    > show that homeopathic medicines may have helpful effects."


    No stronger than the placebo effect which is what it exploits.

    The entire semiconductor industry would collapse if the bullshit that
    these jokers believe was even remotely close to being correct.

    Basically any charlatan that wants to practice homeopathy should be
    obliged to live for a year in a malaria region protected only by the
    quackery that they intend to sell to the willfuly ignorant worried well.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown
    Martin Brown, Jun 10, 2014
    #44
  5. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <20140610155149941-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    > > Here is a thought provoking article on the efficacy of TCM.
    > >
    > > <http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/553037>

    >
    > That might be interesting to read if I didn't have to log in.


    you didn't find the back door either!
    nospam, Jun 11, 2014
    #45
  6. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > >>> Homeopathy is all placebo. You might as well have a shaman dance around
    > >>> you while shaking a rattle.
    > >>
    > >> Here is a thought provoking article on the efficacy of TCM.
    > >>
    > >> <http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/553037>

    > >
    > > requires a login.
    > >

    > You cannot figure the back door?
    > Oh my!


    can't be bothered.

    post a workable link.
    nospam, Jun 11, 2014
    #46
  7. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > >> Here's what WebMD has to say about it.
    > >> <http://www.webmd.com/balance/guide/homeopathy-topic-overview>

    > >
    > > that doesn't say much of anything.
    > >

    > From the article:
    > "highly diluted or "potentiated" substances. There is some evidence to
    > show that homeopathic medicines may have helpful effects."


    'may have'.

    not 'does have'.

    it's at best, a placebo.
    nospam, Jun 11, 2014
    #47
  8. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > >> If you look at the definition, vaccines, and anti-venoms, fall into the
    > >> category of homeopathic medicines.

    > >
    > > no they don't.

    >
    > Here's a quote from the above article:
    > "Homeopathy is based on the idea that "like cures like." That is, if a
    > substance causes a symptom in a healthy person, giving the person a very
    > small amount of the same substance may cure the illness. In theory, a
    > homeopathic dose enhances the body's normal healing and self-regulatory
    > processes."
    >
    > That is exactly how vaccines work.


    no it isn't.

    vaccines have enough material to cause the body to generate an immune
    response.

    homeopathic remedies do not. they don't even have 1 molecule of the
    original 'substance', which has little to do with whatever ailment it's
    supposedly trying to cure anyway.

    > > vaccines contain inert antigens so the body's immune system can build
    > > up antibodies, but on occasion, there can be side effects and even
    > > death.
    > >

    >
    > Some, but not all. Some are live vaccines.


    some are, but that doesn't change anything.

    > > a homeopathic remedy (it's not medicine) is a substance that is highly
    > > diluted in water, so much so that it won't even have one *molecule* of
    > > the substance in the final product.
    > >
    > > in other words, it's plain water.

    >
    > And your authority for that statement applying to ALL?


    it's what homeopathy is.

    > > it's complete bullshit and does absolutely nothing whatsoever to cure
    > > anything that plain ordinary water would not do.
    > >
    > > however, it can't hurt, because it's just water.

    >
    > Depends on the dilution factor.


    duh.

    > You are also aware that an excess of water is a major killer of people?


    nobody is claiming to drink fatal amounts of water.

    you're as usual, trying to twist things.

    > >> Acupuncture and trans-cutaneous electrical devices really do provide
    > >> pain relief.

    > >
    > > also not homeopathy and they make extreme claims.
    > >

    > Such extreme claims that TNS requires a prescription. It seems that body
    > builders were using them to cure pain, to the degree that they were
    > suffering pulled tendons without feeling the pain.
    > BTW I used to be on the board of a TNS manufacturer, and have seen the
    > results of controlled efficacy studies. I am telling you that they
    > greatly reduce pain. However, the newer ones are not as good.


    it's still considered to be a non-standard treatment.
    nospam, Jun 11, 2014
    #48
  9. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/10/2014 6:51 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2014-06-10 19:39:51 +0000, PeterN <> said:
    >
    >> On 6/10/2014 2:12 PM, Savageduck wrote:

    >
    > << Le Snip >>
    >
    >>> Homeopathy is all placebo. You might as well have a shaman dance around
    >>> you while shaking a rattle.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Here is a thought provoking article on the efficacy of TCM.
    >>
    >> <http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/553037>

    >
    > That might be interesting to read if I didn't have to log in.
    >


    I didn't have to log in. I did a Google search on efficacy traditional
    Chinese, and I just clicked on the article.


    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #49
  10. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/10/2014 7:18 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <20140610155149941-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>, Savageduck
    > <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >
    >>> Here is a thought provoking article on the efficacy of TCM.
    >>>
    >>> <http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/553037>

    >>
    >> That might be interesting to read if I didn't have to log in.

    >
    > you didn't find the back door either!
    >


    He's not a computer expert.

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #50
  11. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/10/2014 7:21 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>>> Here's what WebMD has to say about it.
    >>>> <http://www.webmd.com/balance/guide/homeopathy-topic-overview>
    >>>
    >>> that doesn't say much of anything.
    >>>

    >> From the article:
    >> "highly diluted or "potentiated" substances. There is some evidence to
    >> show that homeopathic medicines may have helpful effects."

    >
    > 'may have'.
    >
    > not 'does have'.
    >
    > it's at best, a placebo.
    >


    I see you are a health care expert, too.


    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #51
  12. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/10/2014 7:21 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>>> If you look at the definition, vaccines, and anti-venoms, fall into the
    >>>> category of homeopathic medicines.
    >>>
    >>> no they don't.

    >>
    >> Here's a quote from the above article:
    >> "Homeopathy is based on the idea that "like cures like." That is, if a
    >> substance causes a symptom in a healthy person, giving the person a very
    >> small amount of the same substance may cure the illness. In theory, a
    >> homeopathic dose enhances the body's normal healing and self-regulatory
    >> processes."
    >>
    >> That is exactly how vaccines work.

    >
    > no it isn't.
    >
    > vaccines have enough material to cause the body to generate an immune
    > response.
    >
    > homeopathic remedies do not. they don't even have 1 molecule of the
    > original 'substance', which has little to do with whatever ailment it's
    > supposedly trying to cure anyway.
    >
    >>> vaccines contain inert antigens so the body's immune system can build
    >>> up antibodies, but on occasion, there can be side effects and even
    >>> death.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Some, but not all. Some are live vaccines.

    >
    > some are, but that doesn't change anything.
    >
    >>> a homeopathic remedy (it's not medicine) is a substance that is highly
    >>> diluted in water, so much so that it won't even have one *molecule* of
    >>> the substance in the final product.
    >>>
    >>> in other words, it's plain water.

    >>
    >> And your authority for that statement applying to ALL?

    >
    > it's what homeopathy is.


    Plain water? Wrong again.

    >
    >>> it's complete bullshit and does absolutely nothing whatsoever to cure
    >>> anything that plain ordinary water would not do.
    >>>
    >>> however, it can't hurt, because it's just water.

    >>
    >> Depends on the dilution factor.

    >
    > duh.


    You brought up dilution.

    >
    >> You are also aware that an excess of water is a major killer of people?

    >
    > nobody is claiming to drink fatal amounts of water.


    Just where did I say that. You can easily read my statement.

    >
    > you're as usual, trying to twist things.


    You just twisted my words, and then accuse me of twisting. Interesting.

    >
    >>>> Acupuncture and trans-cutaneous electrical devices really do provide
    >>>> pain relief.
    >>>
    >>> also not homeopathy and they make extreme claims.
    >>>

    >> Such extreme claims that TNS requires a prescription. It seems that body
    >> builders were using them to cure pain, to the degree that they were
    >> suffering pulled tendons without feeling the pain.
    >> BTW I used to be on the board of a TNS manufacturer, and have seen the
    >> results of controlled efficacy studies. I am telling you that they
    >> greatly reduce pain. However, the newer ones are not as good.

    >
    > it's still considered to be a non-standard treatment.
    >

    Wrong. Properly manufactured units are FDA approved and their cost is
    covered by Medicare and most insurance plans. Their use and limitations
    is also taught to physical therapy students. But since when do you let
    the facts prevent you from spouting.

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #52
  13. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <2014061016443658643-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>,
    Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    > > it's at best, a placebo.

    >
    > Homeopathic medicine is best described as irresponsible medicine.


    absolutely.

    > It will do nothing for a bacterial infection. It will do nothing for a
    > viral infection. It will not miraculously unblock a cardiac artery. It
    > doesn't do that well with snake bite. It has a lousy success rate with
    > pancreatic cancer. It won't even do a damn thing for pollen allergies.


    yep, and what's bad is that people might forego real treatment,
    thinking that the homeopathic remedy is all that's needed.

    > It might convince a believer that their headache is gone.


    typical headaches go away on their own whether you take anything for it
    or not.
    nospam, Jun 11, 2014
    #53
  14. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > >> Here is a thought provoking article on the efficacy of TCM.
    > >>
    > >> <http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/553037>

    > >
    > > That might be interesting to read if I didn't have to log in.

    >
    > I didn't have to log in. I did a Google search on efficacy traditional
    > Chinese, and I just clicked on the article.


    web sites often let you get past the paywall if it's a google search
    result.

    otherwise, it's blocked.
    nospam, Jun 11, 2014
    #54
  15. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > >>> Here is a thought provoking article on the efficacy of TCM.
    > >>>
    > >>> <http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/553037>
    > >>
    > >> That might be interesting to read if I didn't have to log in.

    > >
    > > you didn't find the back door either!

    >
    > He's not a computer expert.


    neither are you.
    nospam, Jun 11, 2014
    #55
  16. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > >>> a homeopathic remedy (it's not medicine) is a substance that is highly
    > >>> diluted in water, so much so that it won't even have one *molecule* of
    > >>> the substance in the final product.
    > >>>
    > >>> in other words, it's plain water.
    > >>
    > >> And your authority for that statement applying to ALL?

    > >
    > > it's what homeopathy is.

    >
    > Plain water? Wrong again.


    when something is diluted to where not even 1 molecule is present, it's
    plain water.

    > >>> it's complete bullshit and does absolutely nothing whatsoever to cure
    > >>> anything that plain ordinary water would not do.
    > >>>
    > >>> however, it can't hurt, because it's just water.
    > >>
    > >> Depends on the dilution factor.

    > >
    > > duh.

    >
    > You brought up dilution.


    that's how it works.

    > >> You are also aware that an excess of water is a major killer of people?

    > >
    > > nobody is claiming to drink fatal amounts of water.

    >
    > Just where did I say that. You can easily read my statement.


    apparently you can't.

    > > you're as usual, trying to twist things.

    >
    > You just twisted my words, and then accuse me of twisting. Interesting.


    i did no such thing. stop lying.
    nospam, Jun 11, 2014
    #56
  17. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/10/2014 8:38 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>>> Here is a thought provoking article on the efficacy of TCM.
    >>>>
    >>>> <http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/553037>
    >>>
    >>> That might be interesting to read if I didn't have to log in.

    >>
    >> I didn't have to log in. I did a Google search on efficacy traditional
    >> Chinese, and I just clicked on the article.

    >
    > web sites often let you get past the paywall if it's a google search
    > result.


    Funny I saw no request for payment, even with the link. Simply
    registration. If you don;t know how to get around that, you're even more
    of a fool than you attitude here shows you to be.


    >
    > otherwise, it's blocked.
    >



    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #57
  18. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/10/2014 8:38 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>>>> Here is a thought provoking article on the efficacy of TCM.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> <http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/553037>
    >>>>
    >>>> That might be interesting to read if I didn't have to log in.
    >>>
    >>> you didn't find the back door either!

    >>
    >> He's not a computer expert.

    >
    > neither are you.
    >

    \I never claim to be. Despite my dropping out when I just needed four
    credits and an already approved theses to get an MS in computer science.

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #58
  19. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > >>>> Here is a thought provoking article on the efficacy of TCM.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> <http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/553037>
    > >>>
    > >>> That might be interesting to read if I didn't have to log in.
    > >>
    > >> I didn't have to log in. I did a Google search on efficacy traditional
    > >> Chinese, and I just clicked on the article.

    > >
    > > web sites often let you get past the paywall if it's a google search
    > > result.

    >
    > Funny I saw no request for payment, even with the link.


    paywall often means payment, but not always.

    > Simply
    > registration. If you don;t know how to get around that, you're even more
    > of a fool than you attitude here shows you to be.


    the only fool is you.

    i already explained one way to get around it.

    however, i have better things to do, not to mention that going through
    a back door, as you suggest, is not good advice.

    if you can't be bothered to post a valid link then *you* are the fool.
    nospam, Jun 11, 2014
    #59
  20. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/10/2014 8:46 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>>>> a homeopathic remedy (it's not medicine) is a substance that is highly
    >>>>> diluted in water, so much so that it won't even have one *molecule* of
    >>>>> the substance in the final product.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> in other words, it's plain water.
    >>>>
    >>>> And your authority for that statement applying to ALL?
    >>>
    >>> it's what homeopathy is.

    >>
    >> Plain water? Wrong again.

    >
    > when something is diluted to where not even 1 molecule is present, it's
    > plain water.
    >
    >>>>> it's complete bullshit and does absolutely nothing whatsoever to cure
    >>>>> anything that plain ordinary water would not do.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> however, it can't hurt, because it's just water.
    >>>>
    >>>> Depends on the dilution factor.
    >>>
    >>> duh.

    >>
    >> You brought up dilution.

    >
    > that's how it works.
    >
    >>>> You are also aware that an excess of water is a major killer of people?
    >>>
    >>> nobody is claiming to drink fatal amounts of water.

    >>
    >> Just where did I say that. You can easily read my statement.

    >
    > apparently you can't.
    >
    >>> you're as usual, trying to twist things.

    >>
    >> You just twisted my words, and then accuse me of twisting. Interesting.

    >
    > i did no such thing. stop lying.
    >


    The predicted response.

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #60
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