TCP Sliding Window?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Wendy, Dec 1, 2004.

  1. Wendy

    Wendy Guest

    Does the receiver have to wait for the Window to fill before sending an ACK?

    Regards,
    Rygel
    Wendy, Dec 1, 2004
    #1
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  2. Wendy wrote:

    > Does the receiver have to wait for the Window to fill before sending an ACK?


    No.

    Regards,

    Marco.
    M.C. van den Bovenkamp, Dec 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. Wendy

    Hansang Bae Guest

    In article <>, rygel_16
    @hotmail.com says...
    > Does the receiver have to wait for the Window to fill before sending an ACK?


    No. But typically, Delayed-ACK is in play so it will ack every two
    packets (or when the delayed-ack timer goes off)


    --

    hsb

    "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
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    Hansang Bae, Dec 2, 2004
    #3
  4. Wendy wrote:
    > Does the receiver have to wait for the Window to fill before sending an ACK?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Rygel


    Most operating systems send an ACK for every 2nd segment they receive or
    after 200ms if there are no more segments.
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Ignaz_Kr=E4henmann?=, Dec 5, 2004
    #4
  5. In article <41b33897$>,
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Ignaz_Kr=E4henmann?= <> wrote:
    :Wendy wrote:
    :> Does the receiver have to wait for the Window to fill before sending an ACK?

    :Most operating systems send an ACK for every 2nd segment they receive or
    :after 200ms if there are no more segments.

    Hansang mentioned 'Delayed ACK' in his posting, which is the same
    feature as the 200ms timer that Ignaz mentions.

    As a small clarification: 200 ms is a common maximum timeout value.
    The actual timeout used is theoretically uniformly randomly distributed
    between 1 ms and an implimentation-dependant maximum value. The largest
    timeout allowed by the standards is 1/2 second (500 ms.)

    In practice, the times are often not uniformly randomly distributed.
    For example, recently on SGI's IRIX, I noted timeouts in the range of
    176 ms to 214 ms, but 201 to 203 ms were noticably more common than
    other values. I also noticed that on IRIX, all the connections with a
    given remote machine ran off of the -same- timer, resulting in those
    connections operating in lock-step, rather than being independant
    for each connection.
    --
    WW{Backus,Church,Dijkstra,Knuth,Hollerith,Turing,vonNeumann}D ?
    Walter Roberson, Dec 5, 2004
    #5
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