Tales of the South Pacific

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by samsloan, Jul 13, 2011.

  1. samsloan

    samsloan Guest

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988
    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988

    Tales of the South Pacific
    By James A. Michener

    Introduction by Sam Sloan

    Tales of the South Pacific was the first book by James A. Michener and
    the book that made him famous. It was followed by many more books in
    the historical novel format, taking known and accurate historical
    events and weaving into them fictional personalities created by the
    writer's imagination.

    This, his first book, was written in 1946 and published in 1947 when
    he was 40. It became the basis for the Broadway and film musical South
    Pacific by Rodgers and Hammerstein. Tales of the South Pacific won the
    Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1948. The Broadway plays on which it is
    based are the most popular plays ever created. Rodgers and Hammerstein
    produced the most popular songs ever to come out of a single
    production. Through the genius of Rogers and Hammerstein, we have
    today "Bali Ha'i", "I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My Hair",
    "Some Enchanted Evening", "Happy Talk", "Younger than Springtime" and
    "I'm in Love with a Wonderful Guy". These are songs we still hear over
    and over again. "I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My Hair" is the
    song most closely identified with the work (especially since she did
    not wash him out of her hair but ended up marrying him). However,
    "Some Enchanted Evening" by different recording artists is the song
    most often heard.

    Another song, "You've Got to Be Carefully Taught", has been criticized
    as too controversial for the musical stage. The song basically says
    that people are not born with racial prejudices, they are taught them.
    It has been called indecent and pro-Communist and attempts to ban the
    movie have been based on this song. The movie producers wanted to cut
    this and other references to racial differences from the film, but
    James Michener strenuously objected, saying that to cut this out would
    cut out the essence of what the movie was all about, and so it stayed
    in. James Michener recalled, “The authors replied stubbornly that this
    number represented why they had wanted to do this play, and that even
    if it meant the failure of the production, it was going to stay in.”

    The 1958 movie version (the most popular version) changes the sequence
    of events, starting with an early “There Is Nothing Like a Dame” by
    the sailors. This sets the plot. The only women on the island, besides
    Bloody Mary, are Navy nurses, but they have all been made officers and
    thus are off limits to all but the American officers. The American
    enlisted men can only dream about women, because none are available.
    There is an island nearby named "Bali Ha'i" with a multitude of
    beautiful and available women, but this island is off-limits to the
    enlisted men, who can only get there if an officer authorizes their
    trip. Such an officer is found in Lieutenant Joe Cable, and his
    interest is perked when Bloody Mary sings to him "Bali Ha'i I hear you
    calling."

    The book consists of a series of short stories. They were woven into a
    musical and later a movie by combining some of the characters. Emile
    de Becque, a middle-aged French planter with a dark past who happens
    to live on the island, woos and weds 22-year-old nurse Ensign Nellie
    Forbush from Little Rock Arkansas. His character is combined with The
    Remittance Man, who broadcasts information about the Japanese ship and
    troop movements from a vantage point at the top of a high mountain. In
    the book, The Remittance Man is eventually captured and beheaded by
    the Japanese and his head is found impaled on a stick on page 77. In
    the movie, Emile de Becque survives and comes back and Nellie Forbush
    decides after all to marry him on page 116.

    Both the book and the movie deal with the delicate subject of
    interracial marriage. Nowadays, this seems quaint because interracial
    marriage has become common, but in 1946 when Michener wrote this book
    is was a hot subject. Interracial marriage was illegal in many states
    including Virginia until 1967 when the United States Supreme Court in
    Loving vs. Virginia, 388 US 1 (1967) declared unconstitutional the
    laws forbidding interracial marriage.

    Michener was especially interested in the subject of interracial
    marriage, because his own marriage had been interracial. His book and
    movie Sayonara about the marriage between a United States Army Officer
    and a Japanese woman was essentially autobiographical because Michener
    himself had married a Japanese woman under similar circumstances.

    The background of Michener himself is most surprising, because
    Michener had no background.

    James Michener himself was a foundling. A foundling is a baby who is
    abandoned at birth by her mother and often left on the steps of a
    church or a hospital or, worse yet, left in a trash dumpster. Michener
    was never able to find out who his mother and father were. This was
    unfortunate for them, as Michener became a millionaire due to the
    popularity of his works and they could have gotten the money had they
    identified themselves.

    Michener also did not have children, as his Japanese wife never had
    children, so Michener has neither known ancestors nor descendants.

    Although there are modifications, the movies and musicals generally
    follow the stories in the book. One big difference is in the movie
    Emile de Becque is a widower with two cute half-Polynesian children.
    Before she knows about this, Nellie Forbush decides to marry him.
    However, upon learning of his racially mixed children, Nellie backs
    out, refuses to see Emile again and asks to be transferred to another
    base.

    This seems unreasonable to us nowadays. We first met Nellie on page
    46. Nellie should have known that Emile, at age 45 and having lived in
    the islands for 26 years, would have had a prior relationship and
    children. However, in the book, the situation is more extreme. In the
    book, Emile de Becque has eight daughters, ranging in ages from 23 to
    7, all by different women, some by Javanese women and some by
    Tonkinese women. Emile has never married any of these women. However,
    he lived with a Polynesian woman who is now dead and he has a daughter
    by her.

    This is Nellie's objection. It is his former life with a Polynesian
    woman that primarily concerns Nellie. She feels that she cannot be
    married to a man who has lived with a nigger (spelled with a small 'n'
    on page 111). Nowadays the N-word is only applied to African-
    Americans, but some Polynesians are just as dark or even darker.

    Nellie finally changes her mind and decides to marry Emile on page 116
    and accepts his daughters.

    In the book, before she meets Emile, Nellie has a brief affair with
    Commander William Harbison which, however, does not result in sex as
    this was written in 1946 and back then good girls did not even have
    sex on the first date. After dating for a while, Commander Harbison
    tries to force himself on her but she bangs him on the head with a
    coconut on page 48 and their relationship ends. Nellie now realizes
    that he is upper-crust and she is a low class working girl, so it
    would be socially beneath him to marry her. This theme of class and
    racial differences goes throughout the book and movie versions.

    In the 2001 remake of the movie, Nellie Forbush is played by Glen
    Close. Glen Close is a fine actress, but age is a problem with her
    playing Nellie. Glen Close was 54 in 2001, actually older than the
    Emile character.

    One reason the love story in the book is compelling is Nellie has a
    lot of alternatives. Nellie is 22. She is cute and has a great singing
    voice. All the Navy Seabees would like to get her and even Commander
    William Harbison tried for her but was rebuffed. Yet, she falls for a
    45 year old French man.

    Glan Close at age 54 had better take any man she can get as there will
    not be many more opportunities for a woman of her age.

    Bloody Mary, one of the major stars in the movie and the musical,
    first appears on page 139 of the book. One wonders why an unattractive
    old woman with most of her teeth missing (in the book she is aged 55
    and has only 6 teeth left) is in this movie with many beautiful young
    girls. We find out why she is in the movie when she starts singing.
    She sings "Bali Ha'i is your special island" to First Lieutenant Joe
    Cable. Later, we find out why this is his “special island”. It is
    because Bloody Mary plans to marry the Lieutenant Cable to her
    teenaged daughter, Liat.

    This part of the movie would be difficult to film under today's laws.
    Bloody Mary leaves the Lieutenant alone with her very young daughter
    who speaks not a word of English, obviously expecting intercourse.
    Lieutenant Cable sings to her, “Younger Than Springtime” which seems
    most likely to put her under the legal age. Meanwhile, Bloody Mary is
    announcing to others that her daughter and the lieutenant are going to
    marry.

    The book explains that on page 139 Bloody Mary is “about fifty-five,
    not more than five feet tall, weighed about 110 pounds, had few teeth
    and those funereally black, was sloppy in dress and had thin ravines
    running out from the corners of her mouth.”

    This description has given work to many actresses who otherwise would
    never have gotten a leading role in the movies or on Broadway. Bloody
    Mary is a great singer, although in the 1958 movie version her singing
    voice is supplied by a black singer, Muriel Smith, who was the off-
    film ghost singer in several other hit movies.

    The island of "Bali Ha'i" first appears on page 147. The book explains
    that "Bali Ha'i" is a small island, hidden from view by a much larger
    island. All of the women are kept there, to protect them from being
    raped by the Americans. This abundance of women is what makes it seem
    like a paradise.

    Upon reaching "Bali Ha'i", Bloody Mary takes Lieutenant Cable through
    the jungle to a small hut where, on page 153, he meets Liat, perhaps
    aged 17. There is never any doubt about what will happen, as he
    caresses her and removes her clothing immediately. With moments, they
    have had intercourse on page 154. She was a virgin and she washes up
    the blood. It is not until after they have had intercourse that she
    begins speaking. She speaks fluent French, having been taught it by
    the nurses on the island.

    In the move version, Liat speaks not a word of either language.
    However, she is a great swimmer and they do underwater swim dancing
    and love making. Lieutenant Cable is in love and forgets all about the
    girl he left behind in Philadelphia. He has sung “My Girl Back Home"
    about her.

    Bloody Mary and her daughter Tonkinese. Tonkinese are not native to
    the islands. They are Chinese from the Bay of Tonkin area of Vietnam.
    They came to the islands only nine years ago.

    In the book, Lieutenant Cable makes the mistake of taking Liat to a
    party given by Sister Clement. Liat does not want to go but Lieutenant
    Cable insists that she come. There are many upper-crust French girls
    at the party. They are affronted by the fact that an islander girl has
    been brought amongst them.

    Later, Sister Clement insists in page 174 that Lieutenant Cable drop
    Liat. If he has an urgent need to marry, he can have any one of the
    French girls in the island. This will not be a problem for Liat, as
    many local boys on the island want to marry her, Sister Clement says.

    In the book, on page 178, Lieutenant Cable tells Bloody Mary that he
    cannot marry Liat because he cannot take her home with him. The reason
    is obviously race. Bloody Mary says that he can stay here. She offers
    him money. She has a lot of money (from selling black market goods for
    “Fo Dolla”) plus she has a rich brother in Hanoi.

    This scene is in the movie and here they break into song, singing
    "Happy Talk".

    In the book, on page 180, Lieutenant Cable sneaks back to see Liat
    again and again, and each time they make love. Liat says she knew all
    along that Lieutenant Cable could never marry her. Now, she just wants
    to have a baby with him. She wants to become pregnant!!!!

    In the movie, Liat refuses to marry any man other than Lieutenant
    Cable. However, the book has a different ending. Cable makes love to
    Liat a few more times. When Cable still refuses to marry her, Bloody
    Mary angrily drags her off to marry a fat and ugly French planter
    named Benoit, who has many children by other women.

    Cable knows Benoit and goes to meet him. Benoit proudly announces on
    page 186 that he is going to marry a girl that he has been wanting to
    marry for a long time. Benoit probably has no idea that Cable has been
    making love to Liat for a long time and that she might even be
    pregnant.

    Cable goes to see Liat. She and Bloody Mary are waiting for him. Liat
    tells Cable on page 187 that she is going to marry Benoit. She is
    surprised when Cable tells her that he knows Benoit. Bloody Mary gives
    Cable one “last chance” to marry Liat. Liat offers to make love to
    Cable again, even while she is waiting for Benoit to arrive. Cable
    says that he still cannot marry her. He is about to move on to another
    island further north to fight in the war.

    Cable leaves and watches from the distance while Benoit arrives, puts
    his arm around Liat on page 189 and takes her away.

    On page 190, as the troops are moving out, Bloody Mary tells the other
    marines on the trucks what has been going on. She tells them that
    Cable has been coming again and again to see Liat
    “Makes . . .” (implying that she might be pregnant). The other Marines
    call her by her nickname of “Fo' Dolla”, because that is the price at
    which she often sells her goods.

    The movie ends with Lieutenant Cable killed while working with Emile
    de Becque to spot the Japanese troop movements, leaving Liat
    distraught.

    In the book, there are several more stories that are only vaguely
    mentioned in the movie, such as the story about the Boar's Head.

    The book ends with several of the principle characters in the book
    being killed in the war. The grave digger on page 324 takes the reader
    on a tour of the graves he has dug. He likes this job because he is
    Black and here all men are finally equal. There is no race here, no
    rank. There are no bad men here. All are good. All are heroes. Their
    families back home will remember them as heroes, whether the really
    were or not.

    “There are no officers and men. There are only men. Here is the grave
    of First Lieutenant Joe Cable, USMCR. He got his'self into some
    trouble down south. Everybody called him 'Fo Dollar'. Made him mighty
    mad. . . . Well come the beachhead, he go after the Japs mighty tough.
    Finally he got his. Go down all in a lump.”

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988
    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988

    Sam Sloan
    samsloan, Jul 13, 2011
    #1
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  2. samsloan

    samsloan Guest

    One should not try to visit Bali Ha'i as it is a mythical island. The
    book places it next to Vanicoro Island. The real Vanikoro Island is in
    the Solomon Islands and has a smaller island named Banie next to it.
    It is probably this island that Michener was thinking of. On 26
    October 1942, The Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands was fought. It
    resulted in a victory by the Japanese. Japanese sources call it the
    Battle of the South Pacific. This is probably the reason why the book
    ends with so many of the Americans being killed.

    It is by pure coincidence that there is an island named Bali in
    Indonesia. Although it has nothing to do with the Bali Ha'i in the
    book, the Island of Bali has remade itself to resemble Bali Hai. There
    are even places on the island now named Bali Ha'i. Beautiful girls
    (some of them prostitutes) flock to Bali, making it resemble the Bali
    Hai in the book.

    Sam Sloan

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988
    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988
    samsloan, Jul 14, 2011
    #2
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  3. samsloan

    Pjk Guest

    On Jul 14, 7:48 am, samsloan <> wrote:
    > One should not try to visit Bali Ha'i as it is a mythical island. The
    > book places it next to Vanicoro Island. The real Vanikoro Island is in
    > the Solomon Islands and has a smaller island named Banie next to it.
    > It is probably this island that Michener was thinking of. On 26
    > October 1942, The Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands was fought. It
    > resulted in a victory by the Japanese. Japanese sources call it the
    > Battle of the South Pacific. This is probably the reason why the book
    > ends with so many of the Americans being killed.
    >
    > It is by pure coincidence that there is an island named Bali in
    > Indonesia. Although it has nothing to do with the Bali Ha'i in the
    > book, the Island of Bali has remade itself to resemble Bali Hai. There
    > are even places on the island now named Bali Ha'i. Beautiful girls
    > (some of them prostitutes) flock to Bali, making it resemble the Bali
    > Hai in the book.
    >
    > Sam Sloan
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988...dnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988


    Luckily I saw this in NYC before it closed and it was amazing. The
    theater was relatively small so there were no bad seats, and there is
    a section of stage that comes out into maybe two dozen orchestra rows.
    I hadn't seen it in years and I had forgotten how many great numbers
    there are in it. Not a dry eye in the place at the end. ($125.00 /
    ticket!) I can't watch the film anymore. And curiously, this is the
    only Mitchner I cannot get through.

    Pjk
    Pjk, Jul 14, 2011
    #3
  4. Pjk <> wrote in
    news::


    > Luckily I saw this in NYC before it closed and it was amazing. The
    > theater was relatively small so there were no bad seats, and there is
    > a section of stage that comes out into maybe two dozen orchestra rows.
    > I hadn't seen it in years and I had forgotten how many great numbers
    > there are in it. Not a dry eye in the place at the end. ($125.00 /
    > ticket!) I can't watch the film anymore.


    I went on the 4th of July not long before it closed, with a coupon for
    $65.00 seats. With the huge cast and big orchestra, it's remarkable
    that they could keep the show going as long as they did even at
    $125! Last year was terrible for me, and that was one of the few
    highlights.

    - Sol L. Siegel, Philadelphia, PA USA
    Sol L. Siegel, Jul 15, 2011
    #4
  5. samsloan

    samsloan Guest

    The original “road show” or “director's cut” of the movie was 15
    minutes longer. Among the scenes cut out were one of Bloody Mary
    hawking her grass skirts while singing and dancing, one where Stew Pot
    touches Luther Billis on the arm because it suggests that they might
    be gay and one showing the workshop operated by Luther Billis where he
    has the other Seabees making “authentic shrunken heads”.

    There were extensive cuts of the two most expensive scenes. When
    Lieutenant Cable and Luther Billis arrive by boat and are immediately
    surrounded by a bevy of beautiful girls, some swimming in the water,
    others laughing and giggling, there are just too many girls, more than
    one hundred, and some are cut. Later, during the Boar's Head ceremony
    where supposedly native dancers are performing their traditional
    ceremony before killing the boar, only a fraction of the scene
    survives, even though a professional choreographer had been brought in
    to create the scene.



    On Jul 14, 4:48 am, samsloan <> wrote:
    > One should not try to visit Bali Ha'i as it is a mythical island. The
    > book places it next to Vanicoro Island. The real Vanikoro Island is in
    > the Solomon Islands and has a smaller island named Banie next to it.
    > It is probably this island that Michener was thinking of. On 26
    > October 1942, The Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands was fought. It
    > resulted in a victory by the Japanese. Japanese sources call it the
    > Battle of the South Pacific. This is probably the reason why the book
    > ends with so many of the Americans being killed.
    >
    > It is by pure coincidence that there is an island named Bali in
    > Indonesia. Although it has nothing to do with the Bali Ha'i in the
    > book, the Island of Bali has remade itself to resemble Bali Hai. There
    > are even places on the island now named Bali Ha'i. Beautiful girls
    > (some of them prostitutes) flock to Bali, making it resemble the Bali
    > Hai in the book.
    >
    > Sam Sloan
    >

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988
    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988
    samsloan, Jul 15, 2011
    #5
  6. samsloan

    samsloan Guest

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988
    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988

    Here are some scenes from the movie:

    This is the opening scene. The pilot, Lt. Buzz Adams, with cigar,
    played by Tom Laughlin, flies in Lieutenant Joe Cable, played by John
    Kerr.

    This is the first song. The Navy Seabees sing “Bloody Mary is the Girl
    I Love”, to Bloody Mary, center, who is selling a variety of goods,
    including shrunken human heads. There is a sign at the left
    advertising Luther Billis Laundry. Stew Pot gives a haircut.

    Stew Pot, Luther Billis and other Nave Seabees sing “There is Nothing
    like a Dame”.

    Bloody Mary has a Boar's Tooth. Luther Billis is excited to see it and
    wants to know where she got it. She got it in Bali Hai.

    This scene was taken out of the final cut of the movie. Bloody Mary
    waves the grass skirts she is selling while singing and dancing. This
    is one of the best scenes that did not make the movie.

    Another scene that was cut out. Stew Pot touches Luther Billis on the
    arm. This was probably cut out because it suggests that they might be
    gay.

    Bloody Mary offering a shrunken human head to Lieutenant Joe Cable.
    Lieutenant refuses the offer, saying his girl back home would not
    appreciate it. However, Luther Billis is excited by the offer and
    wants to know where she got it. Bloody Mary explains that she got it
    on Bali Hai.

    Lieutenant Cable wants to know what Bali Hai. There it is, Bloody Mary
    explains, as she starts to sing the song.

    Notice the smokey, foggy background in this and other scenes. This is
    to add the mystery and allure to the fabulous but unknown island of
    Bali Hai.

    “Bali Hai I hear you calling, come to me, come to me”, sings Blody
    Mary.

    Lieutenant Joe Cable is captured in thoughts as Bloody Mary sings to
    him about Bali Hai. This is the first scene in which colored filters
    are used on the cameras. The filters are red, yellow, blue or foggy.
    In this scene, a red tint is used to depict Lieutenant Cable becoming
    excited and aroused as he stares off at Bali Hai. These filters were
    considered a great technological advance at the time but now they are
    regarded as a distraction.

    Here the scene quickly cuts to Emile and Nellie who already know each
    other. This is the first scene in the Broadway play and in the
    European edition of the movie. Emile explains in song that they met in
    “One Enchanted Evening”.

    After they have finished singing “There is Nothing Like a Dame”, a
    group of Navy nurses comes jogging past the Seabees. However, the
    nurses are off-limits because they are officers and the men are merely
    enlisted men.

    Another scene cut from the movie. Luther Billis has a side business
    called “Luther Billis Enterprises” where he has the other men making
    “human heads”.

    Nellie “Washes that Man Right Out of” her hair while the other nurses
    watch. Perhaps the most famous song from this movie.

    While Nellie is still washing her hair, Emile rides up on a horse.
    Another nurse tries to signal to Nellie that “That Man” is
    approaching. Meanwhile, the other nurses gather their things and clear
    out so as to leave Nellie alone with Emile.

    Nellie dances to an audience of military servicemen. Mitzi Gaynor was
    a professional on Broadway as a dancing performer before she got this
    role and this is one of her best scenes. Elizabeth Taylor, who
    auditioned for this role, could never have done it.

    Nellie sings those deathless lines, “She is Broad, where a Broad
    should be Broad”.

    Underwater Love Making. Joe Cable kisses Liat. She may not be able to
    speak English, but she sure can swim. It is believed that this is the
    first underwater dance scene in the movies since Esther Williams.


    Bloody Mary proposes that Cable marry Liat. She says that she has
    money and will pay for everything. Lieutenant Cable is probably not
    impressed with the financial offer, as he is a Princeton graduate and
    has been offered a partnership with a major law firm when he returns
    to Philadelphia. He does seem impressed with the girl, however.

    Emile and Nellie sing “Some Enchanted Evening” together.

    Emile first sung Some Enchanted Evening to Nellie. He sings it twice
    in the movie. The second time comes after the “I'm Going to Wash That
    Man out of My Hair” scene. The second singing was in a duet with
    Nellie but it was cut out in the final cut of the movie.

    Upon landing at Bali Hai, Joe and Luther are immediately surrounded
    with girls, so many girls that most of the scenes with them are cut.

    Cable and Luther are taken to see the Boar's Head Ceremony. However,
    almost all of it got cut out of the final cut.

    This picture is supposed to depict Native Islanders dancing in the
    Boar's Head Ceremony. However, it is obviously a picture of some
    African-Americans dancing something they learned in The Bronx.
    Mercifully, this scene was cut from the movie.

    Bloody Mary introduces her daughter Liat to Joe Cable. “You like?”,
    she asks. Joe likes and within moments, Bloody Mary leaves the room
    and the scene cuts to the sky as Joe and Liat obviously are having
    intercourse.

    Lieutenant Cable sings “Younger Than Springtime” to Liat. The actress
    who plays Liat had just turned 18 when this was filmed, making this
    scene legal, as they have already had sex.

    Scenes depicting Bali Hai as a paradise, with girls sliding down and
    diving into the water.

    Bloody Mary sings “Happy Talk” to Lieutenant Cable, while Liat makes
    cute hand signals.


    Liat and Lieutenant Cable kiss. Bloody Mary thinks she has sealed the
    deal, but moments later Cable says that he cannot marry Liat.

    Lieutenant Cable has just told Liat that he cannot marry her. Bloody
    Mary becomes angry, and struggles with Liat who wants to stay with
    Cable any way. Bloody Mary rips the watch Cable has just given to Liat
    out of her hands, throws it back to Cable and drags Liat off to marry
    another man.

    Nellie stares out into the ocean hoping that Emile has survived the
    Japanese attack. She already knows that Lieutenant Cable has been
    killed.

    Nellie comforts Liat who she has just learned is in love with
    Lieutenant Cable who has just been killed.

    Nellie previously rejected a marriage proposal by Emile after learning
    that Emile has mixed race children by a Polynesian woman who has died.
    Now, Emile has gone off to the war as a radio operator, known in the
    book as “The Remittance Man”. Nellie has overcome her racism and has
    decided to marry Emile anyway. However, she does not know if Emile is
    alive or dead. So, she takes care of Emile's children while awaiting
    his return.

    The closing scene in the movie. Emile has returned alive and holds
    hands with Nellie as the movie pans to the magnificent scenery behind
    them.

    Mitzi Gaynor as Nellie Forbush singing “I'm in Love With a Wonderful
    Guy”


    Bloody Mary proposes that Cable marry Liat. She says that she has
    money and will pay for everything. Lieutenant Cable is probably not
    impressed with the financial offer as he is a Princeton graduate and
    has been offered a partnership with a major law firm when he returns
    to Philadelphia. He does seem impressed with the girl, however.

    Liat doing cute hand signals while her mother Bloody Mary sings “Happy
    Talk”. The one actress whose career advanced because of this movie was
    France Nguyen, who plays Liat. Unknown before this movie, she
    subsequently appeared in many important productions, including the
    Star Trek series. She became a stage actress and played the lead in
    the theatrical production of “The World of Suzie Wong”. She appears in
    The Joy Luck Club and Battle for the Planet of the Apes. However, now
    she has found her true calling as a clinical psychologist in Los
    Angeles, so if you are crazy, go see France Nguyen, or go see John
    Kerr who plays Joe Cable and who works as a lawyer.

    The islanders bringing out a live boar to be eaten. However, we know
    what these islanders really ate. They did not merely eat boars. They
    ate people!!

    Mitzi Gaynor as Nellie singing “I'm Only a Cockeyed Optimist”

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988
    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988
    samsloan, Jul 16, 2011
    #6
  7. samsloan

    samsloan Guest

    The book is out and published now. I sent it to the printers a few
    minutes ago:

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988

    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988

    Bloody Mary proposes that Cable marry Liat. She says that she has
    money and will pay for everything. Lieutenant Cable is probably not
    impressed with the financial offer as he is a Princeton graduate and
    has been offered a partnership with a major law firm when he returns
    to Philadelphia. He does seem impressed with the girl, however.

    Liat doing cute hand signals while her mother Bloody Mary sings “Happy
    Talk”. The one actress whose career advanced because of this movie was
    France Nguyen, who plays Liat. Unknown before this movie, she
    subsequently appeared in many important productions, including the
    Star Trek series. She became a stage actress and played the lead in
    the theatrical production of “The World of Suzie Wong”. She appears in
    The Joy Luck Club and Battle for the Planet of the Apes. However, now
    she has found her true calling as a clinical psychologist in Los
    Angeles, so if you are crazy, go see France Nguyen, or go see John
    Kerr who plays Joe Cable and who works as a lawyer.

    The islanders bringing out a live boar to be eaten. However, we know
    what these islanders really ate. They did not merely eat boars. They
    ate people!!

    Mitzi Gaynor as Nellie singing “I'm Only a Cockeyed Optimist”

    As Lieutenant Joe Cable and Seabee Luther Billis approach Bali Hai in
    a boat, hundreds of girls line up to greet them. French nurses in
    white are to the left, local island girls are to the right and
    swimming in the water.

    This may seem like an improbable fantasy, but any veteran of the
    Korean and Vietnam Wars will tell you that when Navy ships docked in
    Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines or Thailand, the girls would gather on
    the shore awaiting the Navy men just like this.

    Now doubt they did this in World War II, too.

    There were many Bloody Marys in those wars too, trying to marry their
    daughters to Navy men.

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988

    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988
    samsloan, Jul 17, 2011
    #7
  8. samsloan

    samsloan Guest

    It is difficult to understand what NONE a/k/a Joe Schmoe a/k/a Stan
    Booz, a 1601 rated chess player, is trying to accomplish with this.
    Now, not only is he covering up my postings about "Tales of the South
    Pacific", but he has a created a new fake posting entitles Tales of
    the South Pacific.

    Me? I am just trying to bring the way, the truth and the life to the
    Great Unwashed Masses, plus make some money while doing it.

    By the way, the book is out now, available at a bookstore near you.

    Sam Sloan

    On Jul 16, 8:46 pm, samsloan <> wrote:
    > The book is out and published now. I sent it to the printers a few
    > minutes ago:
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988
    >
    > http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988
    >
    > Bloody Mary proposes that Cable marry Liat. She says that she has
    > money and will pay for everything. Lieutenant Cable is probably not
    > impressed with the financial offer as he is a Princeton graduate and
    > has been offered a partnership with a major law firm when he returns
    > to Philadelphia. He does seem impressed with the girl, however.
    >
    > Liat doing cute hand signals while her mother Bloody Mary sings “Happy
    > Talk”. The one actress whose career advanced because of this movie was
    > France Nguyen, who plays Liat. Unknown before this movie, she
    > subsequently appeared in many important productions, including the
    > Star Trek series. She became a stage actress and played the lead in
    > the theatrical production of “The World of Suzie Wong”. She appears in
    > The Joy Luck Club and Battle for the Planet of the Apes. However, now
    > she has found her true calling as a clinical psychologist in Los
    > Angeles, so if you are crazy, go see France Nguyen, or go see John
    > Kerr who plays Joe Cable and who works as a lawyer.
    >
    > The islanders bringing out a live boar to be eaten. However, we know
    > what these islanders really ate. They did not merely eat boars. They
    > ate people!!
    >
    > Mitzi Gaynor as Nellie singing “I'm Only a Cockeyed Optimist”
    >
    > As Lieutenant Joe Cable and Seabee Luther Billis approach Bali Hai in
    > a boat, hundreds of girls line up to greet them. French nurses in
    > white are to the left, local island girls are to the right and
    > swimming in the water.
    >
    > This may seem like an improbable fantasy, but any veteran of the
    > Korean and Vietnam Wars will tell you that when Navy ships docked in
    > Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines or Thailand, the girls would gather on
    > the shore awaiting the Navy men just like this.
    >
    > Now doubt they did this in World War II, too.
    >
    > There were many Bloody Marys in those wars too, trying to marry their
    > daughters to Navy men.
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878988
    >
    > http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/product.aspx?ISBN=4871878988
    samsloan, Jul 17, 2011
    #8
  9. samsloan

    tomcervo Guest

    tomcervo, Jul 19, 2011
    #9
    1. Advertising

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