Systems can be 1-3 kms apart; 1 or multiple LANs?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by qazmlp1209@rediffmail.com, Apr 2, 2007.

  1. Guest

    We need to keep the server(server-1) and the clients which connect to
    this server, within the campus distance(1-3 km).
    We have other servers also, as part of the network.

    I would like to know whether it is a good idea to keep the server-1
    and its clients as part of the same LAN, or different LANs(and they
    communicate via the router). What are the factors that I should
    consider to decide this. For the time being, please ignore the VLAN
    configuration for it.
    , Apr 2, 2007
    #1
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  2. Guest

    On 2 Apr, 12:17, wrote:
    > We need to keep the server(server-1) and the clients which connect to
    > this server, within the campus distance(1-3 km).
    > We have other servers also, as part of the network.
    >
    > I would like to know whether it is a good idea to keep the server-1
    > and its clients as part of the same LAN, or different LANs(and they
    > communicate via the router). What are the factors that I should
    > consider to decide this. For the time being, please ignore the VLAN
    > configuration for it.


    Hello,

    With such small distances, the distance as such is not
    relevant as to whether to choose once VLAN design
    over another.

    What is relevant is the relative location of the clients and servers
    with respect to the communications channels available and
    the bandwidth of those channels relative to the expected traffic
    levels.

    Cisco now has some excellent documents on its web site.
    Look for "System Reference Network Design" (SRND) for
    "Campus" networks.

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns656/networking_solutions_program_category_home.html

    These days the move is towards more and more layer 3
    and less and less layer 2. L3 switches can run at wire rate on
    all ports so there are no longer the performance limitations
    of routers to consider in many cases. The industry has moved to
    having servers centralised (in the network topology and
    physically too) and clients distributed as required with
    client VLANS being chosen based on location. (Wireless
    can be different).

    That's all for now, good luck.
    , Apr 2, 2007
    #2
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  3. Guest

    On Apr 2, 5:38 pm, wrote:
    > On 2 Apr, 12:17, wrote:
    > Cisco now has some excellent documents on its web site.
    > Look for "System Reference Network Design" (SRND) for
    > "Campus" networks.
    >
    > http://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns656/networking_solutions_program_...

    That was a nice article and it was useful.

    Btw, I would like to know what exactly/roughly can be the maximum
    distance for a Campus network.
    I understand that as we use L3 switches for the systems in the 2 LANs
    to communicate, the distance can be more. But, still I feel there must
    be a standard/typical definition for the Campus network and it must
    mention about the distance.
    , Apr 2, 2007
    #3
  4. Guest

    On 2 Apr, 15:38, wrote:
    > On Apr 2, 5:38 pm, wrote:> On 2 Apr, 12:17, wrote:
    > > Cisco now has some excellent documents on its web site.
    > > Look for "System Reference Network Design" (SRND) for
    > > "Campus" networks.

    >
    > >http://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns656/networking_solutions_program_...

    >
    > That was a nice article and it was useful.
    >
    > Btw, I would like to know what exactly/roughly can be the maximum
    > distance for a Campus network.
    > I understand that as we use L3 switches for the systems in the 2 LANs
    > to communicate, the distance can be more. But, still I feel there must
    > be a standard/typical definition for the Campus network and it must
    > mention about the distance.


    Why?

    One thing is that the performance of file systems, database servers
    etc. diminishes with network round trip time but
    other than for special purposes this is not an issue over
    10s or 100s of km. It is an issue over 1000s of km.
    Research "Bandwidth delay product" if you are interested.

    With the distances you mention there are no issues at all
    for almost all purposes in most parts of the world (i.e. where
    such networking is cheap).
    , Apr 3, 2007
    #4
  5. Guest

    On 3 Apr, 02:14, wrote:
    > On 2 Apr, 15:38, wrote:
    >
    > > On Apr 2, 5:38 pm, wrote:> On 2 Apr, 12:17, wrote:
    > > > Cisco now has some excellent documents on its web site.
    > > > Look for "System Reference Network Design" (SRND) for
    > > > "Campus" networks.

    >
    > > >http://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns656/networking_solutions_program_...

    >
    > > That was a nice article and it was useful.

    >
    > > Btw, I would like to know what exactly/roughly can be the maximum
    > > distance for a Campus network.
    > > I understand that as we use L3 switches for the systems in the 2 LANs
    > > to communicate, the distance can be more. But, still I feel there must
    > > be a standard/typical definition for the Campus network and it must
    > > mention about the distance.

    >
    >
    > With the distances you mention there are no issues at all
    > for almost all purposes in most parts of the world (i.e. where
    > such networking is cheap).


    For example - the largest corporation or university with
    buildings spread accross the extremities of a large city
    could use a "Campus Network Architecture" for its entire
    network.

    It stops being a Campus network when either
    RTT becomes large, or when bandwidth is restricted
    due to the high cost of communications links.
    , Apr 3, 2007
    #5
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