"Swell ... Now Dell' Cells Are Puttin' Me Through HELL!"

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by MissSouth, Aug 15, 2006.

  1. MissSouth

    MissSouth Guest

    Dell, the computer-maker whose quality control and sales have been
    SLIDING for more than 2 years, issues a recall of 4 million Sony-made
    laptop batteries following fires and fears!

    -----

    "Fire Hazard Causes Dell To Recall Laptop Batteries"

    "Action Affects Over 4 Million Devices"

    By Sara Kehaulani Goo and Annys Shin
    Washington Post Staff Writers
    Tuesday, August 15, 2006; A01

    Dell Inc. said yesterday that it would recall 4.1 million lithium-ion
    batteries for laptop computers after several dangerous incidents in
    which the batteries burst into flames and damaged other property.

    The move by the world's largest PC maker marks one of the biggest
    safety recalls in the history of consumer electronics and serves as a
    setback for Dell, which has been hit by stiff competition and steep
    customer-service costs, causing earnings to tumble and its stock price
    to lag in recent months. The recall is also likely to intensify reviews
    underway at agencies that have been studying the dangers of battery
    packs commonly used in many electronic devices, from iPods to portable
    DVD players and cellphones.

    The National Transportation Safety Board last month held a hearing
    about the safety of lithium batteries on airplanes after a fire
    occurred Feb. 7 on a cargo jet. The UPS plane, which was carrying
    lithium-ion batteries, among other items, caught fire in flight and
    landed safely in Philadelphia. Investigators have not announced the
    cause of the fire and have not made any safety recommendations about
    the transportation of such batteries.

    In a separate incident, a Dell laptop ignited during a conference
    several months ago in Japan. Digital photos from the event posted at
    online news sites show flames shooting from the laptop, as if an
    explosion had occurred, leaving burn marks on the green tablecloth
    under the computer. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which
    said Dell brought the situation to the agency's attention under federal
    guidelines, said the company has documented half a dozen such
    accidents.

    "We feel we have determined what the problem is and that problem has
    been corrected. Considering the volumes of lithium-ion batteries used
    in the world today, not just in notebook computers . . . the incidents
    involving some kind of overheating are really quite rare," said Jess
    Blackburn, a Dell spokesman. "We certainly have our customer safety at
    the front of our concerns."

    The recalled batteries, components of which were made by Sony Corp.,
    were used in several types of Dell Latitude, Inspiron, Precision and
    XPS models sold from April 2004 through July 2006 through the company's
    catalogue, Web site or over the phone. Consumers are advised to stop
    using the batteries immediately and contact Dell for a replacement at
    http://www.dellbatteryprogram.com , which the company said would be
    online as of today. Customers may continue to use the computers by
    turning them off, ejecting the battery and using the power cord
    instead.

    Sony said the recall would have a financial impact on the company but
    declined to discuss details. "Sony is very sensitive and concerned
    about the quality of our products and safety of our products," said
    Rick Clancy, a Sony spokesman. "We are supporting Dell's recall."

    The problem of lithium-ion batteries overheating is not new, and
    consumer groups and the aviation safety communities have long been
    concerned. Battery packs contain cells that sometimes contain
    microscopic metal pieces, which can become overheated when they come
    into contact with other components. Usually, when a battery overheats,
    it causes the computer to shut down. In a few cases, however, the
    battery has ignited. No one has died in such an accident, the Consumer
    Product Safety Commission said.

    "Once the battery reaches incredibly high temperatures, it doesn't have
    a mechanism to vent heat or cut itself off," commission spokesman Scott
    Wolfson said. The Dell recall stemmed from a quality-control issue, he
    said.

    In an incident last month, Thomas Forqueran, 62, of Arizona, was
    loading his truck and smelled smoke. Flames were shooting out of his
    Dell Inspiron laptop, which he had placed on the passenger side of the
    vehicle, and spread as the fire ignited ammunition that was also in the
    truck. The truck, a 1966 Ford F-250 passed down from his father, was
    destroyed by fire.

    "I see Dell commercials half a dozen times a night, saying 'What can we
    build for you today?' " Forqueran said. "And I say, 'Grandpa's truck.'
    "

    Consumer electronics companies play down the safety hazard of
    lithium-ion batteries, saying that such incidents are rare. Sony said
    there have been only "a small number" of fires linked to lithium-ion
    batteries. Sales of the batteries are rising rapidly, the Portable
    Rechargeable Battery Association said. It said that 2 billion
    lithium-ion cells, used in making the batteries, are to be sold this
    year.

    The recall yesterday was not the first for Dell, which has recalled
    more than 330,000 batteries in the past six years because of
    overheating problems.

    The most recent recall came in December and involved about 22,000
    notebook computer batteries. Dell had received three reports of
    batteries overheating. No injuries were reported. In May 2001, Dell
    voluntarily recalled about 284,000 batteries, warning they could
    "become very hot, release smoke, and possibly catch fire," a safety
    commission news release said.

    Seven months earlier, Dell had recalled about 27,000 batteries, saying
    they could "short circuit, even when the battery is not in use."

    Problems with overheating rechargeable batteries have led to recalls at
    several other well-known laptop computer retailers, including
    Hewlett-Packard Co. and Apple Computer Inc.

    In documents, the NTSB detailed several dozen fires in cargo shipments
    and on planes that could be linked to various kinds of batteries. The
    Federal Aviation Administration also is reviewing the issue. In 2004,
    rechargeable lithium batteries in a plastic case started a fire during
    cargo loading at a FedEx hub in Memphis. In March and June 2005,
    packages of rechargeable lithium batteries caught fire while being
    shipped.

    Staff writer Del Quentin Wilber contributed to this report.



    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/14/AR2006081400881.html
     
    MissSouth, Aug 15, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. MissSouth

    Alex Clayton Guest

    "MissSouth" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Dell, the computer-maker whose quality control and sales have been
    > SLIDING for more than 2 years, issues a recall of 4 million Sony-made
    > laptop batteries following fires and fears!
    >
    > -----

    While I am not impressed with Dell, I find it hard to blame them for
    batteries made by Sony.
    --
    Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer.
    Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does
    not go nearly as well with pizza. --Dave Barry
     
    Alex Clayton, Aug 15, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. MissSouth

    Keith Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > "MissSouth" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Dell, the computer-maker whose quality control and sales have been
    > > SLIDING for more than 2 years, issues a recall of 4 million Sony-made
    > > laptop batteries following fires and fears!
    > >
    > > -----

    > While I am not impressed with Dell, I find it hard to blame them for
    > batteries made by Sony.


    Don't discount the way they're used, in particular the charging
    circuit/method.

    --
    Keith
     
    Keith, Aug 15, 2006
    #3
  4. MissSouth

    Alex Clayton Guest

    "Keith" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > says...
    >> "MissSouth" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Dell, the computer-maker whose quality control and sales have been
    >> > SLIDING for more than 2 years, issues a recall of 4 million Sony-made
    >> > laptop batteries following fires and fears!
    >> >
    >> > -----

    >> While I am not impressed with Dell, I find it hard to blame them for
    >> batteries made by Sony.

    >
    > Don't discount the way they're used, in particular the charging
    > circuit/method.
    >
    > --
    > Keith


    Since I don't own a Dell, I have not really cared much about this. Is the
    problem something to do with the PC's and not the batteries? If that the
    case I am sure the lawyers will soon let us know since there will surly be
    someone getting sued here.
    --
    Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer.
    Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does
    not go nearly as well with pizza. --Dave Barry
     
    Alex Clayton, Aug 15, 2006
    #4
  5. MissSouth

    Keith Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > "Keith" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > In article <>,
    > > says...
    > >> "MissSouth" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> > Dell, the computer-maker whose quality control and sales have been
    > >> > SLIDING for more than 2 years, issues a recall of 4 million Sony-made
    > >> > laptop batteries following fires and fears!
    > >> >
    > >> > -----
    > >> While I am not impressed with Dell, I find it hard to blame them for
    > >> batteries made by Sony.

    > >
    > > Don't discount the way they're used, in particular the charging
    > > circuit/method.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Keith

    >
    > Since I don't own a Dell, I have not really cared much about this. Is the
    > problem something to do with the PC's and not the batteries? If that the
    > case I am sure the lawyers will soon let us know since there will surly be
    > someone getting sued here.


    It really could be either, but the (battery) technology has had a
    lot of troubles. Cell phones have been known to burst into flames
    too. The battery in my XM MyFi Radio was replaced as a "recall"
    (they sent me a new battery and instructed me to replace it
    immediately) about six months ago.

    There is a lot of energy in those little batteries. If someone
    lets the magic smoke escape it's going to be noticeable.

    --
    Keith
     
    Keith, Aug 15, 2006
    #5
  6. MissSouth

    Alex Clayton Guest

    "Keith" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > It really could be either, but the (battery) technology has had a
    > lot of troubles. Cell phones have been known to burst into flames
    > too. The battery in my XM MyFi Radio was replaced as a "recall"
    > (they sent me a new battery and instructed me to replace it
    > immediately) about six months ago.
    >
    > There is a lot of energy in those little batteries. If someone
    > lets the magic smoke escape it's going to be noticeable.
    >
    > --
    > Keith


    Weren't the Cell batteries that were problems counterfeits? I had read a
    couple articles about that, but the ones I read blamed it on batteries that
    had been made then had a fake label put on them. I had read that some even
    made it into the supply stream of the manufacturers, which caused the
    "recall". I know I used to buy Cell batteries from the cheapest place I
    could find them until I read about this. I decided from now on to just buy
    from the big name places. Same with things like flash memory. I had bought
    several 512 jump drives and SD cards off Ebay. I guess I got lucky as I
    later found out the same problem was going on with these. Now if
    Wal-Mart.com has what I need they are my first choice even if they are
    slightly higher. At least I know with them if there is ANY trouble all I
    have to do is take it to any store and it's a no hassle return.
    --
    "Little girls like butterflies, need no excuse".

    Lazarus Long
     
    Alex Clayton, Aug 15, 2006
    #6
  7. In comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips Keith <> wrote in part:
    > Don't discount the way they're used, in particular the
    > charging circuit/method.


    Agreed. Short of mechanical damage, it's rather rare for
    anything to happen to a battery that is just sitting there,
    not receiving or providing current.

    But do anything and you will get heat. Even "floating"
    there will be heat from the 60 Hz ripple and the charging
    overvoltage and internal resistance.

    If the heat isn't properly removed (HSF?!?) temperature will
    increase pretty much without limit until it is removed.

    -- Robert
     
    Robert Redelmeier, Aug 15, 2006
    #7
  8. MissSouth

    Keith Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > "Keith" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > It really could be either, but the (battery) technology has had a
    > > lot of troubles. Cell phones have been known to burst into flames
    > > too. The battery in my XM MyFi Radio was replaced as a "recall"
    > > (they sent me a new battery and instructed me to replace it
    > > immediately) about six months ago.
    > >
    > > There is a lot of energy in those little batteries. If someone
    > > lets the magic smoke escape it's going to be noticeable.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Keith

    >
    > Weren't the Cell batteries that were problems counterfeits? I had read a
    > couple articles about that, but the ones I read blamed it on batteries that
    > had been made then had a fake label put on them. I had read that some even
    > made it into the supply stream of the manufacturers, which caused the
    > "recall".


    That's the story they're trying to tell. FWIG, Li-Ion chemistry is
    pretty fickle and the charger has to be designed for that
    particular cell (some laptop batteries have electronics in them) so
    this excuse may even be close to the truth. ;-)

    BTW, apparently it's not only Li-Ion that has problems. I've heard
    some pretty bad horror stories from model airplane hobbyists using
    fast charge NiMH batteries too. According to the reports, a couple
    of cars have been taken out by these things.

    > I know I used to buy Cell batteries from the cheapest place I
    > could find them until I read about this. I decided from now on to just buy
    > from the big name places. Same with things like flash memory. I had bought
    > several 512 jump drives and SD cards off Ebay. I guess I got lucky as I
    > later found out the same problem was going on with these.


    Buying on the cheap always has its risks. I'm looking for memory
    for my laptop (1GB DDR2 PC2-5300, IIRC). I've always used Crucial,
    but not sure if the 50% margin is worth it. I know the next 50%
    for the manufacturer's part isn't.

    > Now if
    > Wal-Mart.com has what I need they are my first choice even if they are
    > slightly higher. At least I know with them if there is ANY trouble all I
    > have to do is take it to any store and it's a no hassle return.


    They'll put the magic smoke back in the battery? ;-)

    --
    Keith
     
    Keith, Aug 15, 2006
    #8
  9. MissSouth

    Alex Clayton Guest

    "Keith" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >> Now if
    >> Wal-Mart.com has what I need they are my first choice even if they are
    >> slightly higher. At least I know with them if there is ANY trouble all I
    >> have to do is take it to any store and it's a no hassle return.

    >
    > They'll put the magic smoke back in the battery? ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Keith


    LOL, no I don't know if they sell Batteries for Cell. I meant for PC stuff
    like memory. I had someone who knows a hell of a lot more about these things
    (PC's) than I do recommend NewEgg. I was wanting an external drive to use as
    a back up so I ordered one from them. Came to me DOA. Then I found that to
    send it back to them I had to pay shipping and pay them to "re stock" their
    defective shit. That was the last time they will get me. I ordered another
    one from Wally. It worked, but if it had not all I would have had to do was
    take it to one of their stores.
    For my cell batteries I guess I will just buy from whichever carrier I am
    using at that time. They are about twice as much but what the hell how many
    am I going to ever buy? Rather than risk it I will just order an extra from
    them.
    --
    "Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites.
    Moderation is for monks."

    [Lazarus Long]
     
    Alex Clayton, Aug 15, 2006
    #9
  10. On Tue, 15 Aug 2006 14:46:18 -0400, Keith <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > says...
    >> "Keith" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> >
    >> > It really could be either, but the (battery) technology has had a
    >> > lot of troubles. Cell phones have been known to burst into flames
    >> > too. The battery in my XM MyFi Radio was replaced as a "recall"
    >> > (they sent me a new battery and instructed me to replace it
    >> > immediately) about six months ago.
    >> >
    >> > There is a lot of energy in those little batteries. If someone
    >> > lets the magic smoke escape it's going to be noticeable.
    >> >
    >> > --
    >> > Keith

    >>
    >> Weren't the Cell batteries that were problems counterfeits? I had read a
    >> couple articles about that, but the ones I read blamed it on batteries that
    >> had been made then had a fake label put on them. I had read that some even
    >> made it into the supply stream of the manufacturers, which caused the
    >> "recall".

    >
    >That's the story they're trying to tell. FWIG, Li-Ion chemistry is
    >pretty fickle and the charger has to be designed for that
    >particular cell (some laptop batteries have electronics in them) so
    >this excuse may even be close to the truth. ;-)


    Yeah, it's not clear to me where control circuitry is in the various
    implementations; I believe the laptop (Thinkpad) Li-Ions have quite a bit
    (most ?) of the circuitry in the battery housing - not sure about things
    like digi-cams etc.

    >BTW, apparently it's not only Li-Ion that has problems. I've heard
    >some pretty bad horror stories from model airplane hobbyists using
    >fast charge NiMH batteries too. According to the reports, a couple
    >of cars have been taken out by these things.
    >
    >> I know I used to buy Cell batteries from the cheapest place I
    >> could find them until I read about this. I decided from now on to just buy
    >> from the big name places. Same with things like flash memory. I had bought
    >> several 512 jump drives and SD cards off Ebay. I guess I got lucky as I
    >> later found out the same problem was going on with these.

    >
    >Buying on the cheap always has its risks. I'm looking for memory
    >for my laptop (1GB DDR2 PC2-5300, IIRC). I've always used Crucial,
    >but not sure if the 50% margin is worth it. I know the next 50%
    >for the manufacturer's part isn't.


    I got some Patriot brand PC-3200 DDR for a recent desktop build simply
    because it was on a "special combo" purchase and it's worked fine at rated
    speed: 2-3-2-5-1T. OTOH I'm wary of mfrs like that who obliterate the
    original chip part nos and write their own logos, and sometimes part nos.,
    in its place.

    --
    Rgds, George Macdonald
     
    George Macdonald, Aug 16, 2006
    #10
  11. MissSouth

    Keith Guest

    In article <>, fammacd=!
    SPAM^ says...
    > On Tue, 15 Aug 2006 14:46:18 -0400, Keith <> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <>,
    > > says...
    > >> "Keith" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> >
    > >> > It really could be either, but the (battery) technology has had a
    > >> > lot of troubles. Cell phones have been known to burst into flames
    > >> > too. The battery in my XM MyFi Radio was replaced as a "recall"
    > >> > (they sent me a new battery and instructed me to replace it
    > >> > immediately) about six months ago.
    > >> >
    > >> > There is a lot of energy in those little batteries. If someone
    > >> > lets the magic smoke escape it's going to be noticeable.
    > >> >
    > >> > --
    > >> > Keith
    > >>
    > >> Weren't the Cell batteries that were problems counterfeits? I had read a
    > >> couple articles about that, but the ones I read blamed it on batteries that
    > >> had been made then had a fake label put on them. I had read that some even
    > >> made it into the supply stream of the manufacturers, which caused the
    > >> "recall".

    > >
    > >That's the story they're trying to tell. FWIG, Li-Ion chemistry is
    > >pretty fickle and the charger has to be designed for that
    > >particular cell (some laptop batteries have electronics in them) so
    > >this excuse may even be close to the truth. ;-)

    >
    > Yeah, it's not clear to me where control circuitry is in the various
    > implementations; I believe the laptop (Thinkpad) Li-Ions have quite a bit
    > (most ?) of the circuitry in the battery housing - not sure about things
    > like digi-cams etc.


    ThinkPad batteries certainly have electronics in them, but it's not
    clear how much of the charging circuit is in there. There is some
    NVRAM of some sort in there to count charging cycles and some ROM
    (perhaps in the same NVRAM) that contains the capacity and such,
    but I don't believe the charging circuitry is in the battery.
    Could be, I guess.

    > >BTW, apparently it's not only Li-Ion that has problems. I've heard
    > >some pretty bad horror stories from model airplane hobbyists using
    > >fast charge NiMH batteries too. According to the reports, a couple
    > >of cars have been taken out by these things.
    > >
    > >> I know I used to buy Cell batteries from the cheapest place I
    > >> could find them until I read about this. I decided from now on to just buy
    > >> from the big name places. Same with things like flash memory. I had bought
    > >> several 512 jump drives and SD cards off Ebay. I guess I got lucky as I
    > >> later found out the same problem was going on with these.

    > >
    > >Buying on the cheap always has its risks. I'm looking for memory
    > >for my laptop (1GB DDR2 PC2-5300, IIRC). I've always used Crucial,
    > >but not sure if the 50% margin is worth it. I know the next 50%
    > >for the manufacturer's part isn't.

    >
    > I got some Patriot brand PC-3200 DDR for a recent desktop build simply
    > because it was on a "special combo" purchase and it's worked fine at rated
    > speed: 2-3-2-5-1T. OTOH I'm wary of mfrs like that who obliterate the
    > original chip part nos and write their own logos, and sometimes part nos.,
    > in its place.


    Yep. Even though there is a "lifetime" guaranty on much of the
    memory out there, cutting corners can cause a lot of grief down the
    road. The cost difference is substantial though ($70 cheap stuff,
    $125 Crucial, $180 from Lenovo).

    --
    Keith
     
    Keith, Aug 16, 2006
    #11
  12. MissSouth

    Keith Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > "Keith" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >> Now if
    > >> Wal-Mart.com has what I need they are my first choice even if they are
    > >> slightly higher. At least I know with them if there is ANY trouble all I
    > >> have to do is take it to any store and it's a no hassle return.

    > >
    > > They'll put the magic smoke back in the battery? ;-)
    > >
    > > --
    > > Keith

    >
    > LOL, no I don't know if they sell Batteries for Cell. I meant for PC stuff
    > like memory. I had someone who knows a hell of a lot more about these things
    > (PC's) than I do recommend NewEgg. I was wanting an external drive to use as
    > a back up so I ordered one from them. Came to me DOA. Then I found that to
    > send it back to them I had to pay shipping and pay them to "re stock" their
    > defective shit. That was the last time they will get me. I ordered another
    > one from Wally. It worked, but if it had not all I would have had to do was
    > take it to one of their stores.


    I've likely ordered from NewEgg a fifty times. No problems, but I
    suppose all it takes is once. I just bought a couple of USB drive
    enclosures for an IDE drive that was gathering dust and a SATA that
    was wasting power (never did get it to work in my K8 system - also
    mostly from NewEgg). They work great. NewEgg is near the top of
    my short "will do business with" list.

    I've also ordered small things from WallyWorld. No problems there
    either.

    > For my cell batteries I guess I will just buy from whichever carrier I am
    > using at that time. They are about twice as much but what the hell how many
    > am I going to ever buy? Rather than risk it I will just order an extra from
    > them.


    Yeah. I just had to order a battery for my wife's phone. $30 from
    Verizon. Amazingly, the high capacity (1.7AH vs 1.0AH) battery was
    $22.50, but none in stock. :-(

    --
    Keith
     
    Keith, Aug 16, 2006
    #12
  13. MissSouth

    Alex.Clayton Guest

    "Keith" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > I've likely ordered from NewEgg a fifty times. No problems, but I
    > suppose all it takes is once. I just bought a couple of USB drive
    > enclosures for an IDE drive that was gathering dust and a SATA that
    > was wasting power (never did get it to work in my K8 system - also
    > mostly from NewEgg). They work great. NewEgg is near the top of
    > my short "will do business with" list.
    >
    > I've also ordered small things from WallyWorld. No problems there
    > either.
    >
    >> For my cell batteries I guess I will just buy from whichever carrier I
    >> am
    >> using at that time. They are about twice as much but what the hell how
    >> many
    >> am I going to ever buy? Rather than risk it I will just order an extra
    >> from
    >> them.

    >
    > Yeah. I just had to order a battery for my wife's phone. $30 from
    > Verizon. Amazingly, the high capacity (1.7AH vs 1.0AH) battery was
    > $22.50, but none in stock. :-(
    >
    > --
    > Keith
    >


    Yes once was all they will get from me. I have no problem with someone
    sending me either a wrong item or a DOA item, shit happens. What sealed it
    for me and New Egg was their "you need us, we don't need you" attitude.
    There is too many places to buy this kind of stuff these days for me to put
    up with that kind of customer service.
    I have noticed every year when I change phones that often a "new" phone
    takes a while for batteries to show up for. Hell they last so damn long now
    though that I often wonder why I still bother to buy and extra. I guess it's
    good to have one just in case something happens to the one in the phone, but
    my phone use will never come close to running one dead.
     
    Alex.Clayton, Aug 16, 2006
    #13
  14. On Tue, 15 Aug 2006 12:18:10 -0700, "Alex Clayton" <>
    wrote:

    >"Keith" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>> Now if
    >>> Wal-Mart.com has what I need they are my first choice even if they are
    >>> slightly higher. At least I know with them if there is ANY trouble all I
    >>> have to do is take it to any store and it's a no hassle return.

    >>
    >> They'll put the magic smoke back in the battery? ;-)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Keith

    >
    >LOL, no I don't know if they sell Batteries for Cell. I meant for PC stuff
    >like memory. I had someone who knows a hell of a lot more about these things
    >(PC's) than I do recommend NewEgg. I was wanting an external drive to use as
    >a back up so I ordered one from them. Came to me DOA. Then I found that to
    >send it back to them I had to pay shipping and pay them to "re stock" their
    >defective shit. That was the last time they will get me. I ordered another
    >one from Wally. It worked, but if it had not all I would have had to do was
    >take it to one of their stores.


    Why did you not want to have NewEgg send a replacement unit? Ask for a
    refund and you'll pay a restock fee to *any* of the on-line vendors. In
    all the times, maybe hundreds of items I've bought from NewEgg, the one DOA
    I got was promptly replaced with no hassle. Paying for ship-back is
    standard practice in the on-line buying industry... can sometimes be
    avoided, at some vendors like NewEgg, depending on circumstances, if you
    get the right guy, present a good case and ask nicely.

    IMO NewEgg is about as good as it gets in on-line buying: they don't
    advertize things they don't have and in fact their stock situation has
    always been accurate for me with ETAs even, on out-of-stock stuff. I've
    seen a lot worse: "open-box" posing as "new"; multiple 'phone calls with
    hours of listening to Musak; in fact one "reputable" vendor sent me the
    wrong item and I had to get angry with them and "escalate" to get them to
    pay the ship-back - their initial response was "if you don't send it back
    we'll charge you".

    --
    Rgds, George Macdonald
     
    George Macdonald, Aug 16, 2006
    #14
  15. MissSouth

    Alex Clayton Guest

    "George Macdonald" <fammacd=!SPAM^> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Why did you not want to have NewEgg send a replacement unit? Ask for a
    > refund and you'll pay a restock fee to *any* of the on-line vendors. In
    > all the times, maybe hundreds of items I've bought from NewEgg, the one
    > DOA
    > I got was promptly replaced with no hassle. Paying for ship-back is
    > standard practice in the on-line buying industry... can sometimes be
    > avoided, at some vendors like NewEgg, depending on circumstances, if you
    > get the right guy, present a good case and ask nicely.
    >
    > IMO NewEgg is about as good as it gets in on-line buying: they don't
    > advertize things they don't have and in fact their stock situation has
    > always been accurate for me with ETAs even, on out-of-stock stuff. I've
    > seen a lot worse: "open-box" posing as "new"; multiple 'phone calls with
    > hours of listening to Musak; in fact one "reputable" vendor sent me the
    > wrong item and I had to get angry with them and "escalate" to get them to
    > pay the ship-back - their initial response was "if you don't send it back
    > we'll charge you".
    >
    > --
    > Rgds, George Macdonald


    I do not know where you get your info, but you don't know what your are
    talking about. Many places pay the return shipping if they send you a
    defective item. many of them offer you the choice of having a refund, or
    exchange. The reason I told them to shove it was when I found they wanted me
    to pay to return their defective item. I also had an order for some PC
    memory on the way from them. That I refused, since I am done with them. if
    "you" happen to like them, great. The way they do things is not the way
    "any" on line dealers operate. They have the same attitude the phone Co.
    used to have, "we don't care because we don't have to". I bought the
    replacement from Wally. If It had been defective I could have returned it
    for free, for either a exchange or refund of the FULL cost. Next time I need
    something Wally does not have I will try others but never New Egg again. I'm
    sure they could care less, but there is tons of places to buy from. I don't
    need them.

    --
    "Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites.
    Moderation is for monks."

    [Lazarus Long]
     
    Alex Clayton, Aug 16, 2006
    #15
  16. On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 15:00:01 -0700, "Alex Clayton" <>
    wrote:

    >"George Macdonald" <fammacd=!SPAM^> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Why did you not want to have NewEgg send a replacement unit? Ask for a
    >> refund and you'll pay a restock fee to *any* of the on-line vendors. In
    >> all the times, maybe hundreds of items I've bought from NewEgg, the one
    >> DOA
    >> I got was promptly replaced with no hassle. Paying for ship-back is
    >> standard practice in the on-line buying industry... can sometimes be
    >> avoided, at some vendors like NewEgg, depending on circumstances, if you
    >> get the right guy, present a good case and ask nicely.
    >>
    >> IMO NewEgg is about as good as it gets in on-line buying: they don't
    >> advertize things they don't have and in fact their stock situation has
    >> always been accurate for me with ETAs even, on out-of-stock stuff. I've
    >> seen a lot worse: "open-box" posing as "new"; multiple 'phone calls with
    >> hours of listening to Musak; in fact one "reputable" vendor sent me the
    >> wrong item and I had to get angry with them and "escalate" to get them to
    >> pay the ship-back - their initial response was "if you don't send it back
    >> we'll charge you".
    >>
    >> --
    >> Rgds, George Macdonald

    >
    >I do not know where you get your info, but you don't know what your are
    >talking about. Many places pay the return shipping if they send you a
    >defective item. many of them offer you the choice of having a refund, or
    >exchange.


    Names please!... with URLs of evidence! I have a *lot* of experience with
    buying on-line from *discount* computer parts suppliers so yes... I *do*
    know what I'm talking about - sounds to me like you don't. Again, NewEgg
    *is* about as good as it gets.

    > The reason I told them to shove it was when I found they wanted me
    >to pay to return their defective item. I also had an order for some PC
    >memory on the way from them. That I refused, since I am done with them. if
    >"you" happen to like them, great.


    Attitude problem maybe?.. doesn't help.:-( See last two words of my 1st
    para above.

    > The way they do things is not the way
    >"any" on line dealers operate. They have the same attitude the phone Co.
    >used to have, "we don't care because we don't have to". I bought the
    >replacement from Wally. If It had been defective I could have returned it
    >for free, for either a exchange or refund of the FULL cost. Next time I need
    >something Wally does not have I will try others but never New Egg again. I'm
    >sure they could care less, but there is tons of places to buy from. I don't
    >need them.


    Sounds like Wally World is err, your kinda store.:)

    --
    Rgds, George Macdonald
     
    George Macdonald, Aug 17, 2006
    #16
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.

Share This Page