SurgeStrip Belkin

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Nowhere, Nov 23, 2005.

  1. Nowhere

    Nowhere Guest

    4 sockets, 6,500 amps,. What is the best way to set it up for max
    protection. Can I run tv, dvd, pc on it? Can I run a separate lead from it,
    connecting to further devices? Thanks.
     
    Nowhere, Nov 23, 2005
    #1
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  2. Nowhere

    Paul - xxx Guest

    Nowhere came up with the following;:
    > 4 sockets, 6,500 amps,. What is the best way to set it up for max
    > protection. Can I run tv, dvd, pc on it? Can I run a separate lead from
    > it, connecting to further devices? Thanks.


    Plug in devices until it's full, (4, four, no more, not 5 or six and
    godellpus never 7, just four, 4. It may be less as circumstances dictate,
    but never more than the magical number four.[1]). Don't daisy chain any more
    sockets and devices than it supports.

    [1] I know Monty Python dictates three to be the magical number, but wgaf?

    --
    Paul ...
    (8(|) Homer Rules ..... Doh !!!
     
    Paul - xxx, Nov 23, 2005
    #2
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  3. Nowhere

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2005-11-23, Nowhere <> wrote:
    > 4 sockets, 6,500 amps,. What is the best way to set it up for max
    > protection. Can I run tv, dvd, pc on it? Can I run a separate lead from it,
    > connecting to further devices? Thanks.


    Are you sure about that current? If the thing is plugged into a standard
    240v 13 amp socket, you have 13 amps shared between the four extension
    sockets. That's about 3kw, enough for a three-bar radiant heater. If you
    daisy-chain another extension lead from it you will still only have a
    total of 13 amps or 3kw. As long as the total load is within the 13 amp
    maximum it doesn't matter (from an electrical overload point of view) how
    many devices are plugged in - and computers, audio, and TV sets, each have
    a much lower demand than 13 amps/3kw.

    The maximum consumption of each appliance should be marked on it (look on
    the mains adaptor, not the gadget itself, if the mains adaptor is not
    built in) so you can work out what the total load of any combination would
    be.

    The more things you plug into a single wall-socket, the more 'noise' they
    will inflict on each other. I prefer to keep computer-related things
    running from one wall socket, TV etc from another, and HiFi from yet
    another; with room-heaters, lamps, vacuum-cleaners, and so on, running
    from further wall sockets.

    The biggest 'power-strip' extension leads I've seen have ten sockets in
    one unit (with 'surge protection' for each socket and for a telephone line
    too), which is probably neater than daisy-chaining several smaller 'power
    strips' off each other. Some power strips incorporate LED 'load meters'
    to give you visual warning of possible overloads.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Nov 23, 2005
    #3
  4. Re: SurgeStrip Belkin long answer, but several points to consider about surge strips

    On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 12:50:53 -0000, "Nowhere"
    <> wrote:

    >4 sockets, 6,500 amps,. What is the best way to set it up for max
    >protection. Can I run tv, dvd, pc on it? Can I run a separate lead from it,
    >connecting to further devices? Thanks.
    >


    Jules, not amps. That is enough amps to run a large neighborhood. It
    is not possible.

    Protection from what? If you want protection from a power overload, a
    surge strip will offer little to no protection. A surge strip will
    offer absolutely no protection from blackouts, outages, and brownouts.
    Nothing will protect from a direct lightning strike, but those are so
    rare as to not be a practical risk.

    If you want protection from blackouts, brownouts and outages, a
    Uniterruptable Power Supply (UPS) is the only answer. Actually, not
    all of them are good for brownouts.

    If you want protection from surges, buy a different brand of surge
    strip. Unless they have recently added to their line, I am not aware
    of any decent surge supression unit that Belkin sells.

    That is not necessarily a negative comment about Belkin. Good quality
    surge supressors are simply not their marketing goal. In the same
    vain, many good automobile companies don't make a good truck and many
    good truck companies don't make any automobiles, let alone good ones.
    It is simply a different market.

    APC and Tripplite are the two major brands for the good stuff. Both
    also make cheap units, but you get what you pay for within those
    brands. You need to pay at LEAST $50 USD or it is not good enough even
    for home use, in my opinion. Not that money is a measure of quality,
    just that nothing priced less than that is "the good stuff." Quality
    costs more.

    I can turn a $1.99 USD power strip into a surge protector by adding a
    $0.99 USD part. That makes it a surge strip, but a terrible quality
    one. Some of the cheap ones are actually not much better than that. I
    have opened some up that add two of those $0.99 USD parts and nothing
    else.

    You can run all your items on one strip, but it isn't necessarily a
    great idea. As another poster stated, each device adds some electronic
    "noise" on the line. Some surge protectors address this by isolating
    each outlet or pair of outlets. That helps somewhat.

    "Another lead to connect further devices" is not a great idea for the
    same reason. It is better to buy two surge protectors if you are going
    to plug in that many items.

    You will get some of that electronic "noise" even then, but it will be
    less. Will it be enough to cause problems is the issue. Only trial and
    error will tell because each device has a unique tolerence to this
    "noise."

    Even the lesser expensive units often contain protection for phone
    lines and/or cable tv lines. I have had customers get lightning damage
    via those lines so it is a practical risk, not just a theoretical one.
     
    computer repair pro, Nov 25, 2005
    #4
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