Surge Protectors

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by nYcTracks, Sep 22, 2005.

  1. nYcTracks

    nYcTracks Guest

    Hi,



    I'm looking for three surge protectors to protect my home studio. I live in
    an area that produces frequent violent lightning storms.



    Please help me to identify quality brands and models to purchase?



    Thanks,



    nYcTracks


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    nYcTracks, Sep 22, 2005
    #1
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  2. nYcTracks

    philo Guest

    nYcTracks wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    >
    >
    > I'm looking for three surge protectors to protect my home studio. I live in
    > an area that produces frequent violent lightning storms.
    >
    >



    a surge protector will offer only limited protection

    a UPS will offer better protection

    but the only sure protection is to disconnect

    your AC and your dsl/cable or modem during a storm
    philo, Sep 22, 2005
    #2
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  3. nYcTracks

    nYcTracks Guest

    Thanks philo,

    what are some of the mid to high priced popular models used for home
    recording studios?

    -nYcTracks

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    "philo" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > nYcTracks wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I'm looking for three surge protectors to protect my home studio. I live
    >> in an area that produces frequent violent lightning storms.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > a surge protector will offer only limited protection
    >
    > a UPS will offer better protection
    >
    > but the only sure protection is to disconnect
    >
    > your AC and your dsl/cable or modem during a storm
    nYcTracks, Sep 22, 2005
    #3
  4. nYcTracks

    samuel Guest

    samuel, Sep 22, 2005
    #4
  5. nYcTracks

    dadiOH Guest

    nYcTracks wrote:

    > I'm looking for three surge protectors to protect my home studio. I
    > live in an area that produces frequent violent lightning storms.
    >
    > Please help me to identify quality brands and models to purchase?


    Buy a brand that will pay off without a fuss when your stuff gets
    zapped. Belkin does.

    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
    dadiOH, Sep 22, 2005
    #5
  6. nYcTracks

    JIm Guest

    nYcTracks wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    >
    >
    > I'm looking for three surge protectors to protect my home studio. I live in
    > an area that produces frequent violent lightning storms.
    >
    >
    >
    > Please help me to identify quality brands and models to purchase?
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    >
    >
    > nYcTracks
    >
    >

    APC do a cool range of uninterrupted power supplies
    JIm, Sep 22, 2005
    #6
  7. nYcTracks

    Mitch Guest

    In article <brqYe.155548$084.14184@attbi_s22>, nYcTracks
    <> wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    >
    >
    > I'm looking for three surge protectors to protect my home studio. I live in
    > an area that produces frequent violent lightning storms.


    I'd go for an uninterruptible where the supply is completely discrete
    from the output. In other words, the battery is the only thing powered
    by incoming current, and the battery supplies continuous and sable
    output current.
    In such cases, the battery needs to be protected from spikes (lightning
    is not a surge, and spikes are very hard to detect and clamp down on
    safely). But the equipment is much safer.
    Mitch, Sep 22, 2005
    #7
  8. nYcTracks

    philo Guest

    nYcTracks wrote:
    > Thanks philo,
    >
    > what are some of the mid to high priced popular models used for home
    > recording studios?
    >
    > -nYcTracks
    >



    Well I'd really go with the UPS...
    the surge suppressor only offers minimum protection...
    and NO protection at all if your power drops out even for a second or so
    philo, Sep 23, 2005
    #8
  9. nYcTracks

    w_tom Guest

    The surge protector inside a plug-in UPS is the same
    protector circuit found in power strip protectors.
    Furthermore, since neither even claim to provided 'effective'
    protection, then they both contain only enough (grossly
    undersized) protector components to 'claim' surge protection.

    The ineffective protector is often so grossly undersized as
    to be damaged even by insignificant transients. Surges that
    are too small to overwhelm protection inside the appliance
    will instead damage the grossly undersized plug-in protector -
    both UPS or power strip type.

    Others with professional experience are describing real
    world protection in the newsgroup rec.audio.pro. This in
    response to the same post from the same author with the same
    title: "Surge Protectors".

    How to identify an ineffective protector - one that does not
    even claim to protect from typically destructive transients:
    1) protector has no dedicated wire for the essential 'less
    than 10 foot' connection to earth ground, and 2) manufacturer
    avoids all discussion about earthing.

    Earthing is the protection. An effective protector is
    nothing more than a connection to protection. No protection -
    no earth ground - means an ineffective protector. And so the
    manufacturers of ineffective and grossly overpriced power
    strip and UPS protectors avoid this whole discussion.

    Real world protectors are from manufacturers of responsible
    electricial equipment such as Square D, Polyphaser,
    Intermatic, Leviton, Siemens, Cutler-Hammer, and GE.
    Ineffective protectors are sold under brand names such as APC,
    Tripplite, and Belkin. Effective protectors are sold in Home
    Depot (Intermatic) and Lowes (Cutler-Hammer and GE).
    Ineffective protetors are sold in Sears, Radio Shack, Walmart,
    Circuit City, Staples, Best Buy, and Office Max. Visit that
    discussion entitled "Surge Protectors" in the newsgroup
    rec.audio.pro starting 22 Spet 2005 for further information.

    A UPS connects AC mains direct to the appliance when not in
    battery backup mode. Ineffective protector forgets to mention
    that it does not even claim to protect from a surge that
    typically damages electronics - so that others will recommend
    it. You tell me how that UPS is going to stop what three miles
    of sky could not? SAnd yet that is exact what that UPS must
    do to provide any useful protection. Just another fact made
    obvious by no dedicated earthing connection.

    philo wrote:
    > Well I'd really go with the UPS...
    > the surge suppressor only offers minimum protection...
    > and NO protection at all if your power drops out even
    > for a second or so
    w_tom, Sep 23, 2005
    #9
  10. nYcTracks

    w_tom Guest

    Mitch confuses a type of transient that typically does no
    damage with another type - a destructive common mode
    transient. Common mode means the transient appears on both
    side of a battery equally as it passes destructively through
    adjacent electronics. Since the transient is equal on both
    sides of the battery, then that battery never even sees the
    transient while adjacent electronics are being destroyed.

    Ineffective protectors hope you will assume as Mitch has -
    not learn of another type of transient that seeks earth
    ground, destructively, through adjacent electronics. It also
    hopes Mitch forgets to mention the wire that completely
    bypasses a UPS to carry a destructive transient directly into
    electronics motherboard. Just a few of so many reasons why a
    plug-in UPS would rather avoid all discussion about earthing -
    so that Mitch will recommend it.

    Learn additional facts in a discussion of the same title in
    rec.audio.pro. Or review a discussion posted 10 September
    2005 entitled "lightning strike on the computer" in this
    newsgroup 24hoursupport.helpdesk. As was well proven even in
    the 1930s - a protectors is only as effective as its earth
    ground - which that plug-in UPS recommendation hopes you never
    learn.

    Mitch wrote:
    > I'd go for an uninterruptible where the supply is completely discrete
    > from the output. In other words, the battery is the only thing powered
    > by incoming current, and the battery supplies continuous and sable
    > output current.
    > In such cases, the battery needs to be protected from spikes (lightning
    > is not a surge, and spikes are very hard to detect and clamp down on
    > safely). But the equipment is much safer.
    w_tom, Sep 23, 2005
    #10
  11. nYcTracks

    philo Guest

    <snip>

    >
    > A UPS connects AC mains direct to the appliance when not in
    > battery backup mode.

    <snip>


    My UPS employs a ferroresonant transformer...
    the power pole supplying my house suffered a direct hit...
    nothing on the UPS was damaged...


    I would not leave my system protected by just an MOV...
    that is quite minimal protection.
    philo, Sep 23, 2005
    #11
  12. nYcTracks

    w_tom Guest

    So all the smoke detectors were damaged? All the kitchen
    appliances had to be replaced? All bathroom GFCIs were
    destroyed? What protected them? If we are to believe philo,
    then he must also say his other and unprotected appliances
    were damaged. IOW the protector did not protect anything. A
    direct strike may have been properly earthed on the telephone
    pole. Therefore appliances already with effective internal
    protection were not overwhelmed.

    Next time, philo may not be so lucky. This is why we spend
    about $1 per protected appliance for 'real world' protection
    rather than how much for a ferroresonant UPS that only
    protects one appliance - ineffectively?

    What philo also forgot to mention: a wire that completely
    bypasses his ferroresonant transformer makes a direct
    connection to electronics. Not only does philo have us
    believe his transformer stopped what three miles of sky could
    not, but he also forgets to mention that the transformer is
    completely bypassed.

    Meanwhile, philo also forgot to mention that same protection
    already exists in electronic power supplies. So what is his
    ferroresonant transformer doing? Nothing. The appliance
    already has such protection internally. Protection that is
    not overwhelmed when 'primary protection' (an earthed power
    pole) and secondary protection (a properly earthed 'whole
    house' protector) are installed.

    Philo forgets to mention that a direct strike did not damage
    smoke detectors and therefore also would not damage
    electronics on the UPS. He claims damage did not occur and
    yet really cannot say why. He forgets to mention that damage
    would not have occurred without a ferroresonant UPS -
    protection is also bypassed by an internal wire.

    Philo also did not read. He assumed protection is provided by
    an MOV. He forgets that protection is only as effective as
    the earth ground. But this is why so many useless plug-in
    protectors are recommended. They must forget what 1930 GE and
    Westinghouse science papers proved. Somehow philo thinks MOVs
    provide protection. Again philo forgets that protection is
    earth ground. He has to because he paid so much money for a
    ferroresonant UPS - that has no dedicated connection to earth
    ground.

    philo wrote:
    > My UPS employs a ferroresonant transformer...
    > the power pole supplying my house suffered a direct hit...
    > nothing on the UPS was damaged...
    >
    > I would not leave my system protected by just an MOV...
    > that is quite minimal protection.
    w_tom, Sep 23, 2005
    #12
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