Suggested reading?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by =?iso-8859-1?q?Martin_S=F8rensen?=, Feb 19, 2007.

  1. Ok, I got my D80 earlier this month and am a bit overwhelmed by the
    countless settings, programs, metering methods, AF-modes etc.

    I come from an FA with 35mm and 105mm, used it for 17 years. Most of
    the time I was using the 105 on S with the time on 1/250, if there was
    not enough light for that I was told and I had to take care of
    vibrations. Metering was mostly matrix (or whatever it was called) on
    the FA, but with sanity check against "sunny 16" or a measurement in
    my palm (close enough to 18% when you shoot negative).

    I other words, I have some idea about photography. Any recommendation
    of what/where I should read to figure out how best to use my new
    digital wonder? I have seen Thom Hogan does an e-book on the D80,
    would that be a starting point for me?

    I _have_ Read (TF) Manual, but whereas it tells about all the menus
    and buttons, I don't have much of an overview and I have only little
    clue where to start fiddling and what to leave for now.

    TIA

    Martin
     
    =?iso-8859-1?q?Martin_S=F8rensen?=, Feb 19, 2007
    #1
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  2. "Martin Sørensen" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ok, I got my D80 earlier this month and am a bit overwhelmed by the
    > countless settings, programs, metering methods, AF-modes etc.
    >
    > I come from an FA with 35mm and 105mm, used it for 17 years. Most of
    > the time I was using the 105 on S with the time on 1/250, if there was
    > not enough light for that I was told and I had to take care of
    > vibrations. Metering was mostly matrix (or whatever it was called) on
    > the FA, but with sanity check against "sunny 16" or a measurement in
    > my palm (close enough to 18% when you shoot negative).
    >
    > I other words, I have some idea about photography. Any recommendation
    > of what/where I should read to figure out how best to use my new
    > digital wonder? I have seen Thom Hogan does an e-book on the D80,
    > would that be a starting point for me?
    >
    > I _have_ Read (TF) Manual, but whereas it tells about all the menus
    > and buttons, I don't have much of an overview and I have only little
    > clue where to start fiddling and what to leave for now.


    Go to the library and check out a few books on basic photography. You
    probably should study exposure first. The film photography books are fine
    for learning about exposure.

    Then, proceed on to other topics such as composition.
     
    Charles Schuler, Feb 19, 2007
    #2
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  3. On Feb 19, 10:42 pm, "Charles Schuler" <>
    wrote:
    > "Martin Sørensen" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > > Ok, I got my D80 earlier this month and am a bit overwhelmed by the
    > > countless settings, programs, metering methods, AF-modes etc.

    >
    > > I come from an FA with 35mm and 105mm, used it for 17 years. Most of
    > > the time I was using the 105 on S with the time on 1/250, if there was
    > > not enough light for that I was told and I had to take care of
    > > vibrations. Metering was mostly matrix (or whatever it was called) on
    > > the FA, but with sanity check against "sunny 16" or a measurement in
    > > my palm (close enough to 18% when you shoot negative).

    >
    > > I other words, I have some idea about photography. Any recommendation
    > > of what/where I should read to figure out how best to use my new
    > > digital wonder? I have seen Thom Hogan does an e-book on the D80,
    > > would that be a starting point for me?

    >
    > > I _have_ Read (TF) Manual, but whereas it tells about all the menus
    > > and buttons, I don't have much of an overview and I have only little
    > > clue where to start fiddling and what to leave for now.

    >
    > Go to the library and check out a few books on basic photography. You
    > probably should study exposure first. The film photography books are fine
    > for learning about exposure.
    >

    I think you misunderstand, but let me refrase: I have used a Nikon FA
    for 17 years, some of the time doing my own B/W and colour negative
    printing. I do know about shupper speed, aperture, DOF, the idea of
    the zone system (even if I did not have the patience to use it). I
    focussed manually. I checked what the camera suggested and changed
    settings if I didn't like it, have done a lot of low light pictures.

    What I am after is "what is different about using DSLR compared to
    film SLR".

    > Then, proceed on to other topics such as composition.


    Ooh - I think I can do that the way I have done for the last 20 years
    - ought to scan and post some of the old stuff...

    Regards

    Martin
     
    =?iso-8859-1?q?Martin_S=F8rensen?=, Feb 19, 2007
    #3
  4. =?iso-8859-1?q?Martin_S=F8rensen?=

    TSKO Guest

    "Martin Sørensen" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Feb 19, 10:42 pm, "Charles Schuler" <>
    wrote:
    > "Martin Sørensen" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > > Ok, I got my D80 earlier this month and am a bit overwhelmed by the
    > > countless settings, programs, metering methods, AF-modes etc.

    >
    > > I come from an FA with 35mm and 105mm, used it for 17 years. Most of
    > > the time I was using the 105 on S with the time on 1/250, if there was
    > > not enough light for that I was told and I had to take care of
    > > vibrations. Metering was mostly matrix (or whatever it was called) on
    > > the FA, but with sanity check against "sunny 16" or a measurement in
    > > my palm (close enough to 18% when you shoot negative).

    >
    > > I other words, I have some idea about photography. Any recommendation
    > > of what/where I should read to figure out how best to use my new
    > > digital wonder? I have seen Thom Hogan does an e-book on the D80,
    > > would that be a starting point for me?

    >
    > > I _have_ Read (TF) Manual, but whereas it tells about all the menus
    > > and buttons, I don't have much of an overview and I have only little
    > > clue where to start fiddling and what to leave for now.

    >
    > Go to the library and check out a few books on basic photography. You
    > probably should study exposure first. The film photography books are fine
    > for learning about exposure.
    >

    I think you misunderstand, but let me refrase: I have used a Nikon FA
    for 17 years, some of the time doing my own B/W and colour negative
    printing. I do know about shupper speed, aperture, DOF, the idea of
    the zone system (even if I did not have the patience to use it). I
    focussed manually. I checked what the camera suggested and changed
    settings if I didn't like it, have done a lot of low light pictures.

    What I am after is "what is different about using DSLR compared to
    film SLR".

    > Then, proceed on to other topics such as composition.


    Ooh - I think I can do that the way I have done for the last 20 years
    - ought to scan and post some of the old stuff...

    Regards

    Martin


    Now I am sure you are going to get a number of recomendations of what stinks
    or what is good. I own a D50 and though I know a bit about camera's....I
    found Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure" great. Easy to follow and
    he injects humor in it to make it light reading. 2 thumbs up here. Check
    it out on Amazon and I think the reviews of the book are generally quite
    good.
     
    TSKO, Feb 19, 2007
    #4
  5. I think you misunderstand, but let me refrase: I have used a Nikon FA
    for 17 years, some of the time doing my own B/W and colour negative
    printing. I do know about shupper speed, aperture, DOF, the idea of
    the zone system (even if I did not have the patience to use it). I
    focussed manually. I checked what the camera suggested and changed
    settings if I didn't like it, have done a lot of low light pictures.

    What I am after is "what is different about using DSLR compared to
    film SLR".

    Actually, there is very little difference. The film carrier has been
    replaced by a CMOS or CCD sensor. Of course, it is great to be able to
    adjust ISO on the fly, immediately view images, view the histogram,
    immediately delete mistakes, and so on. Yes, you are right ... I
    misunderstand!

    > Then, proceed on to other topics such as composition.


    Ooh - I think I can do that the way I have done for the last 20 years
    - ought to scan and post some of the old stuff...

    You don't have to post ... if you say you know composition, I accept that
    and apologize for suggesting that you do not.
     
    Charles Schuler, Feb 19, 2007
    #5
  6. =?iso-8859-1?q?Martin_S=F8rensen?=

    Brian Guest

    On 19 Feb 2007 13:25:34 -0800, "Martin Sørensen"
    <> wrote:

    >Ok, I got my D80 earlier this month and am a bit overwhelmed by the
    >countless settings, programs, metering methods, AF-modes etc.
    >
    >I come from an FA with 35mm and 105mm, used it for 17 years. Most of
    >the time I was using the 105 on S with the time on 1/250, if there was
    >not enough light for that I was told and I had to take care of
    >vibrations. Metering was mostly matrix (or whatever it was called) on
    >the FA, but with sanity check against "sunny 16" or a measurement in
    >my palm (close enough to 18% when you shoot negative).
    >
    >I other words, I have some idea about photography. Any recommendation
    >of what/where I should read to figure out how best to use my new
    >digital wonder? I have seen Thom Hogan does an e-book on the D80,
    >would that be a starting point for me?
    >
    >I _have_ Read (TF) Manual, but whereas it tells about all the menus
    >and buttons, I don't have much of an overview and I have only little
    >clue where to start fiddling and what to leave for now.
    >
    >TIA
    >
    >Martin


    A lot of people dislike Scott Kelby's writing style - but his books
    work for me. I'd suggest having a look at his "The Digital
    Photography Book" for starters along with Bryan Peterson's
    "Understanding Exposure". If you're like me you'll then want to get
    deeper into colour management and whatever processing software you
    have.

    Brian
     
    Brian, Feb 19, 2007
    #6
  7. =?iso-8859-1?q?Martin_S=F8rensen?=

    babaloo Guest

    You can shoot digital like film, recording images in jpeg, and working as if
    you are shooting slide film that has almost no latitude for overexposure.
    You can be passively dependent on printing services just like with the
    classic consumer color film negative paradigm.
    If you want to get the most out of your images and understand what digital
    is all about then you need to learn about shooting in raw, processing images
    in Photoshop/Elements and color managed printing.
    Therefore IMHO what to read involves getting a copy of Photoshop or Elements
    and a how to book, of which there are many good primers. There are many very
    good, free video based tutorials on the web that I would reccommend you look
    into that can help jump start basic concepts like using layers in
    PS/Elements, using raw converters and color management. If you enjoyed
    darkroom work then I would bet that you will be amazed at what you can
    relatively easily accomplish in PS/Elements that you could rarely do in a
    darkroom and will vastly improve the quality of your images.
     
    babaloo, Feb 19, 2007
    #7
  8. =?iso-8859-1?q?Martin_S=F8rensen?=

    Steve Wolfe Guest

    > What I am after is "what is different about using DSLR compared to
    > film SLR".


    Your dynamic range is less than that of negative film, and greater than
    that of many (most?) slide films. Other than that, the biggest difference
    is that you need to do work in post - that is probably be where the vast
    majority of your "learning curve" will be.

    steve
     
    Steve Wolfe, Feb 20, 2007
    #8
  9. On Feb 19, 11:17 pm, "Charles Schuler" <>
    wrote:

    > Actually, there is very little difference. The film carrier has been
    > replaced by a CMOS or CCD sensor. Of course, it is great to be able to
    > adjust ISO on the fly, immediately view images, view the histogram,
    > immediately delete mistakes, and so on. Yes, you are right ... I
    > misunderstand!
    >

    I sort of expected it - re-reading my post I could see how.

    > > Then, proceed on to other topics such as composition.

    >
    > Ooh - I think I can do that the way I have done for the last 20 years
    > - ought to scan and post some of the old stuff...
    >
    > You don't have to post ... if you say you know composition, I accept that
    > and apologize for suggesting that you do not.


    Apology accepted - but I think some of my old pictures are worth
    putting on the web.

    regards

    Martin
     
    =?iso-8859-1?q?Martin_S=F8rensen?=, Feb 20, 2007
    #9
  10. On Feb 20, 12:59 am, "babaloo" <> wrote:
    > You can shoot digital like film, recording images in jpeg, and working as if
    > you are shooting slide film that has almost no latitude for overexposure.


    Ok, I am used to colour negative where it is hard to overexpose. Looks
    like the Nikon default has a safety margin there, jugding by the
    histograms. And you have those, which you didn't with slides.

    > You can be passively dependent on printing services just like with the
    > classic consumer color film negative paradigm.


    Or the places where the is a "don't 'improve' my images - afair
    Pixum.de accepts that.

    > If you want to get the most out of your images and understand what digital
    > is all about then you need to learn about shooting in raw, processing images
    > in Photoshop/Elements and color managed printing.


    I sort of had that impression. At the moment I have Nikon's Picture
    Project (came with Camera) and am downloading Capture One LE which I
    have a licence for from SanDisk. I also have a licence for PhotoShop 4
    (yes!) which i can upgrade, I just don't know where to start.

    I just think I am looking at serious hw upgrade before it will be
    bearable - the household computer is a Cube (G4/450MHz), and as far as
    I have figured I need faster processor, more RAM, more disk... used
    Apple workstations keep their value far too well, and I don't
    particularly fancy getting Windows. Linux does not seem to be an
    option due to poor colour management. But I give it a go on the Cube,

    > Therefore IMHO what to read involves getting a copy of Photoshop or Elements
    > and a how to book, of which there are many good primers. There are many very
    > good, free video based tutorials on the web that I would reccommend you look
    > into that can help jump start basic concepts like using layers in
    > PS/Elements, using raw converters and color management. If you enjoyed
    > darkroom work then I would bet that you will be amazed at what you can
    > relatively easily accomplish in PS/Elements that you could rarely do in a
    > darkroom and will vastly improve the quality of your images.


    You are probably right - and thanks.

    Expenses, Expenses...

    /martin
     
    =?iso-8859-1?q?Martin_S=F8rensen?=, Feb 20, 2007
    #10
  11. Charles Schuler, Feb 20, 2007
    #11
  12. =?iso-8859-1?q?Martin_S=F8rensen?=

    Tim Guest

    Hi Martin

    As has already been mentioned the biggest change you'll find is in post
    work, cropping, rotating, perspective correcion & B&W conversion etc just
    for starters

    There are 100's of online tutorials
    If you post with specific requests I'm sure you'll find a lot of what you
    need software training wise on the net

    If you don't already have it here's a link to the pdf manual for the
    camera - I find my D70 one handy to search through
    http://www.abtelectronics.com/images/products/PDF_Files/D80_om.pdf

    The best advice I can give you is to delete your junk on the PC as you go -
    I didn't and I now have about 50Gb of rubbish to sift through looking for
    the few good shots I've managed to get so far - silly silly boy :-(

    I'm not sure about Mac specs but a reasonably good PC spec would be a 3Gh
    CPU with at least 1.5 Gb of RAM I used to have 1Mb and really noticed an
    improvement with the extra 500Mb. If you can stretch to it I'd say treat
    youself to 2Gb the machine will be a lot happier
    HTH

    Tim
    --
    http://www.timdenning.myby.co.uk/
     
    Tim, Feb 20, 2007
    #12
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