Subnetting

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by Alok Singh, Aug 4, 2003.

  1. Alok Singh

    Alok Singh Guest

    Hi All,

    Please help me out understand this.

    How come a subnet with 255.255.255.0 and another one of 255.0.0.0 can work
    together? The ip address are like 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.3. The network
    ids are different in this case but still i can share information for these
    computers.

    Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks in advance

    Alok
    Alok Singh, Aug 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. Alok Singh

    Consultant Guest

    www.learntosubnet.com

    "Alok Singh" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > Please help me out understand this.
    >
    > How come a subnet with 255.255.255.0 and another one of 255.0.0.0 can work
    > together? The ip address are like 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.3. The network
    > ids are different in this case but still i can share information for these
    > computers.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.
    > Thanks in advance
    >
    > Alok
    >
    >
    Consultant, Aug 4, 2003
    #2
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  3. Alok Singh

    Zenner Guest

    Because the 255.0.0.0 subnet mask includes hosts within the 255.255.255.0
    network.

    Any network with 192. *. *. * is part of 255.255.255.0
    192.168.1.* is included in ".

    However, some networks of the 255.0.0.0 subnet will not be available .

    "Alok Singh" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > Please help me out understand this.
    >
    > How come a subnet with 255.255.255.0 and another one of 255.0.0.0 can work
    > together? The ip address are like 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.3. The network
    > ids are different in this case but still i can share information for these
    > computers.
    >
    > Any help would be appreciated.
    > Thanks in advance
    >
    > Alok
    >
    >
    Zenner, Aug 4, 2003
    #3
  4. Alok Singh

    Alok Singh Guest

    ok got it. thanks a lot

    alok

    "Zenner" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Because the 255.0.0.0 subnet mask includes hosts within the 255.255.255.0
    > network.
    >
    > Any network with 192. *. *. * is part of 255.255.255.0
    > 192.168.1.* is included in ".
    >
    > However, some networks of the 255.0.0.0 subnet will not be available .
    >
    > "Alok Singh" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi All,
    > >
    > > Please help me out understand this.
    > >
    > > How come a subnet with 255.255.255.0 and another one of 255.0.0.0 can

    work
    > > together? The ip address are like 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.3. The

    network
    > > ids are different in this case but still i can share information for

    these
    > > computers.
    > >
    > > Any help would be appreciated.
    > > Thanks in advance
    > >
    > > Alok
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    Alok Singh, Aug 4, 2003
    #4
  5. Alok Singh

    Mocirne Guest

    It's basically an addressing "hack". If ComputerA, with
    192.168.1.2/24 sends a message to ComputerB, with
    192.168.1.3/8, it'll send it addressed to 192.168.1.3/24.
    Thus, according to ComputerA, the first 24 bits belongs to
    the network, and 8 bits belongs to the host. ComputerB,
    who thinks instead that the first 8 bits belongs to the
    network, and 24 bits belongs to the host, picks it up. It
    looks at the first 8 network bits, sees that it's 192,
    looks at the remaining 24 host bits, sees that it's
    168.1.3, and realizes that the packet belongs to it.
    Mocirne, Aug 5, 2003
    #5
  6. Alok Singh

    Andy Foster Guest

    <Top posting corrected>

    > > "Alok Singh" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Hi All,
    > > >
    > > > Please help me out understand this.
    > > >
    > > > How come a subnet with 255.255.255.0 and another one of 255.0.0.0 can

    > work
    > > > together? The ip address are like 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.3. The

    > network
    > > > ids are different in this case but still i can share information for

    > these
    > > > computers.
    > > >
    > > > Any help would be appreciated.
    > > > Thanks in advance
    > > >
    > > > Alok
    > > >



    "Kilo The MagnifiKat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > Because the 255.0.0.0 subnet mask includes hosts within the

    255.255.255.0
    > > network.
    > >
    > > Any network with 192. *. *. * is part of 255.255.255.0
    > > 192.168.1.* is included in ".
    > >
    > > However, some networks of the 255.0.0.0 subnet will not be available .
    > >


    > "Zenner" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > Could you expand on this a little bit more for me. It seems to me like

    these
    > are two different classes...class A and a class C subnets. Without a

    router
    > I don't understand how they would be able to communicate. 192-223 is a

    class
    > C range of address.In one instance 192.168.1.2 with a subnet mask
    > 255.0.0.0? 255.0.0.0 already dictates that this is a class A address which
    > runs from 1-126. I don't understand how you would get an IP address of 192
    > to be using a class A subnet and be able to communicate.
    > Thanks for your answer.


    There are essentially 3 places a network resource can reside.

    1. On your PC
    2. On the local subnet - as defined by the subnet mask - your PC will
    communicate directly with the resource PC
    3. Outside the local subnet - as defined by the subnet mask - your PC will
    communicate with the Default Gateway, for the packets to be forwarded

    Your PC uses the subnet mask to determine whether it can find the resource
    on the local subnet.
    Class A,B and C address ranges haven't dictated subnet masks for a long
    time - there aren't enough network addresses.
    If a subnet mask is insufficiently restrictive eg. 255.0.0.0 when the
    physical segment covers a 255.255.255.0 range, your PC will be able to
    communicate with resources on the local subnet, but would expect to find
    other resources on the local subnet instead of going through the default
    gateway.

    HTH

    Andy
    Andy Foster, Aug 5, 2003
    #6
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