SUB C Nicad Batteries

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Mathew Good, Feb 19, 2007.

  1. Mathew Good

    Mathew Good Guest

    I have brought some 2/3 A ones some time back and can't seem to find the firm that I got them from,
    but I am now after some SUB C Nicads at some 1500mha or larger.


    Any one know of a NZ firm that has some in stock..


    Thanks
    Mathew Good, Feb 19, 2007
    #1
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  2. Mathew Good

    El Chippy Guest

    On Mon, 19 Feb 2007 20:00:45 +1300, Mathew Good <mg wrote:

    > I have brought some 2/3 A ones some time back and can't seem to find the firm that I got them from,
    > but I am now after some SUB C Nicads at some 1500mha or larger.
    >
    >
    > Any one know of a NZ firm that has some in stock..
    >
    >
    > Thanks


    Try Tesa electronics in Penrose, Auckland. http://www.tesa.co.nz. They
    have good range of batteries, and repack powertool battery packs so should
    have most of the non-consumer sizes.

    Not sure about NiCd tho, aren't they are dead technology? why not switch
    to NiMH?
    El Chippy, Feb 19, 2007
    #2
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  3. Mathew Good

    EMB Guest

    El Chippy wrote:

    > Try Tesa electronics in Penrose, Auckland. http://www.tesa.co.nz.


    They list a Sanyo tagged sub-C at 1700mAh, part no. MH170

    --
    EMB
    EMB, Feb 19, 2007
    #3
  4. Mathew Good

    The Biker Guest

    "Mathew Good" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > I have brought some 2/3 A ones some time back and can't seem to find the
    > firm that I got them from,
    > but I am now after some SUB C Nicads at some 1500mha or larger.
    >
    >
    > Any one know of a NZ firm that has some in stock..
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    >Jaycar ..

    http://www.jaycar.co.nz/productResults.asp?FORM=CAT
    To my knowledge their prices are better than most retailers.
    The Biker, Feb 19, 2007
    #4
  5. Mathew Good

    The Biker Guest

    "The Biker" <> wrote in message
    news:45d9f7a1$...
    >
    > "Mathew Good" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >>
    >> I have brought some 2/3 A ones some time back and can't seem to find the
    >> firm that I got them from,
    >> but I am now after some SUB C Nicads at some 1500mha or larger.
    >>
    >>
    >> Any one know of a NZ firm that has some in stock..
    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >>
    >>Jaycar ..

    > http://www.jaycar.co.nz/productResults.asp?FORM=CAT
    > To my knowledge their prices are better than most retailers.
    >
    >OOPS......

    you will need to select "batteries" and the sub category "NI-MH
    or Ni Cad whichever you want.
    The Biker, Feb 19, 2007
    #5
  6. Mathew Good

    bAZZ Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    >
    > I have brought some 2/3 A ones some time back and can't seem to find the firm that I got them from,
    > but I am now after some SUB C Nicads at some 1500mha or larger.
    >
    >
    > Any one know of a NZ firm that has some in stock..
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    >

    DPT.co.nz maybe ? I think they have a few batteries.

    bazz
    bAZZ, Feb 19, 2007
    #6
  7. Mathew Good

    Mathew Good Guest

    On 19 Feb 2007 20:53:27 +1300, El Chippy <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 19 Feb 2007 20:00:45 +1300, Mathew Good <mg wrote:
    >
    >> I have brought some 2/3 A ones some time back and can't seem to find the firm that I got them from,
    >> but I am now after some SUB C Nicads at some 1500mha or larger.
    >>
    >>
    >> Any one know of a NZ firm that has some in stock..
    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    >Try Tesa electronics in Penrose, Auckland. http://www.tesa.co.nz. They
    >have good range of batteries, and repack powertool battery packs so should
    >have most of the non-consumer sizes.
    >
    >Not sure about NiCd tho, aren't they are dead technology? why not switch
    >to NiMH?


    Thanks, I will give Tesa a look but last time from memory they did not list the 2/3 A cells

    NiMH have high internal drain, there are some AA cells made by Sanyo that are listed with low
    internal drain, they hold a charge of 90% after 6 months and 85% after one year.
    Mathew Good, Feb 19, 2007
    #7
  8. Mathew Good

    Mathew Good Guest

    On Tue, 20 Feb 2007 00:27:24 +1300, EMB <> wrote:

    >El Chippy wrote:
    >
    >> Try Tesa electronics in Penrose, Auckland. http://www.tesa.co.nz.

    >
    >They list a Sanyo tagged sub-C at 1700mAh, part no. MH170



    Thanks

    Price looks a bit high..

    I have since found that Jaycar have them for $8.90
    Mathew Good, Feb 19, 2007
    #8
  9. Mathew Good

    Don Hills Guest

    Re: SUB C Nicad Batteries

    In article <>,
    Mathew Good < wrote:
    >
    >I have brought some 2/3 A ones some time back and can't seem to find the firm that I got them from,
    >but I am now after some SUB C Nicads at some 1500mha or larger.
    >
    >
    >Any one know of a NZ firm that has some in stock..


    Jaycar is probably best for Sub C.
    If you need 2/3 A again, I bought some from www.sicom.co.nz
    They weren't cheap, but they were the only ones that had them at the time.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286
    Don Hills, Feb 20, 2007
    #9
  10. Mathew Good

    Don Hills Guest

    Re: SUB C Nicad Batteries

    In article <45d95777$>,
    El Chippy <> wrote:
    >Not sure about NiCd tho, aren't they are dead technology? why not switch
    >to NiMH?


    It depends. If you're rebuilding power tool batteries, you need NiCd.
    NiMH cells have a higher internal resistance than NiCd, which is important
    for very high peak drain applications such as power tools, R/C models etc.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286
    Don Hills, Feb 20, 2007
    #10
  11. Mathew Good

    El Chippy Guest

    On Tue, 20 Feb 2007 11:17:53 +1300, Mathew Good <mg wrote:

    > On 19 Feb 2007 20:53:27 +1300, El Chippy <> wrote:
    >


    >>
    >>Not sure about NiCd tho, aren't they are dead technology? why not switch
    >>to NiMH?

    >
    > Thanks, I will give Tesa a look but last time from memory they did not list the 2/3 A cells
    >
    > NiMH have high internal drain, there are some AA cells made by Sanyo that are listed with low
    > internal drain, they hold a charge of 90% after 6 months and 85% after one year.


    Ah, okay, i've only ever had to worry about devices that were designed to
    be charged daily.
    El Chippy, Feb 20, 2007
    #11
  12. Mathew Good

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Re: SUB C Nicad Batteries

    Don Hills wrote:
    > In article <45d95777$>,
    > El Chippy <> wrote:
    > > Not sure about NiCd tho, aren't they are dead technology? why not
    > > switch to NiMH?

    >
    > It depends. If you're rebuilding power tool batteries, you need NiCd.
    > NiMH cells have a higher internal resistance than NiCd, which is
    > important for very high peak drain applications such as power tools,
    > R/C models etc.


    Thanks for that Don. I'd wondered why I hadn't seen any NiMH cordless
    drills. The cheap NiCad ones I keep buying end up with stuffed batteries
    after a year (usually only being used a half-dozen times).
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Feb 20, 2007
    #12
  13. Mathew Good

    Richard Guest

    Re: SUB C Nicad Batteries

    ~misfit~ wrote:

    > Thanks for that Don. I'd wondered why I hadn't seen any NiMH cordless
    > drills. The cheap NiCad ones I keep buying end up with stuffed batteries
    > after a year (usually only being used a half-dozen times).


    My makita has a nimh pack. Plenty of power and torque.
    Richard, Feb 20, 2007
    #13
  14. Mathew Good

    Don Hills Guest

    Re: SUB C Nicad Batteries

    In article <45dabc5c$>, Richard <> wrote:
    >~misfit~ wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for that Don. I'd wondered why I hadn't seen any NiMH cordless
    >> drills. The cheap NiCad ones I keep buying end up with stuffed batteries
    >> after a year (usually only being used a half-dozen times).


    They use cheap unmatched cells. I'm setting up to do some tests on a group
    of these batteries to see just how badly matched they are. While I was
    disassembling batteries to access the individual cells, I found one 14.4
    volt pack that seemed somewhat lighter than the others. Instead of finding
    sub C sized cells inside, I found AA sized cells... unfortunately I only had
    the battery, not the drill, and there was no brand on it.

    >My makita has a nimh pack. Plenty of power and torque.


    18 or 24 volt? I'll bet there's a warning on the battery to let it cool down
    before recharging, too.
    The trend to higher voltages annoys me a bit. It just hastens the eventual
    death of the battery as there are more cells to develop capacity
    differences. I had an old Ryobi Tradeline 7.2 volt drill that had more
    torque than an 18 volt De Walt. The Ryobi would push a long 13 mm wood bit
    through two fenceposts back to back and then tighten a lag bolt into the
    hole, but a dual-speed 18 volt De Walt? Nah.

    I still have the Ryobi, the battery died long ago but I notice Jaycar have
    them in stock... about $100 for a battery? It had better be good.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286
    Don Hills, Feb 20, 2007
    #14
  15. Mathew Good

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Re: SUB C Nicad Batteries

    Don Hills wrote:
    > In article <45dabc5c$>, Richard <>
    > wrote:
    > > ~misfit~ wrote:
    > >
    > > > Thanks for that Don. I'd wondered why I hadn't seen any NiMH
    > > > cordless drills. The cheap NiCad ones I keep buying end up with
    > > > stuffed batteries after a year (usually only being used a
    > > > half-dozen times).

    >
    > They use cheap unmatched cells. I'm setting up to do some tests on a
    > group of these batteries to see just how badly matched they are.
    > While I was disassembling batteries to access the individual cells, I
    > found one 14.4 volt pack that seemed somewhat lighter than the
    > others. Instead of finding sub C sized cells inside, I found AA sized
    > cells... unfortunately I only had the battery, not the drill, and
    > there was no brand on it.
    >
    > > My makita has a nimh pack. Plenty of power and torque.

    >
    > 18 or 24 volt? I'll bet there's a warning on the battery to let it
    > cool down before recharging, too.
    > The trend to higher voltages annoys me a bit. It just hastens the
    > eventual death of the battery as there are more cells to develop
    > capacity differences. I had an old Ryobi Tradeline 7.2 volt drill
    > that had more torque than an 18 volt De Walt. The Ryobi would push a
    > long 13 mm wood bit through two fenceposts back to back and then
    > tighten a lag bolt into the hole, but a dual-speed 18 volt De Walt?
    > Nah.
    >
    > I still have the Ryobi, the battery died long ago but I notice Jaycar
    > have them in stock... about $100 for a battery? It had better be good.


    Interesting, thanks. The batteries for my old Makita were about that, not
    that I ever needed to buy one.

    I worked as a cabinetmaker a wee while back and we all used Makita. I bought
    a cordless driver/drill that came in a (very solid compared with most of the
    shite today) blow-moulded case, two battery packs (The type that fit inside
    the handle, similar to laptop packs, not a big bulge on the bottom) and a 1
    hour fast charger, self-switching, that switched to trickle when charged. I
    think it was also 7.2V. That drill would work an 8 hour day assembling
    kitchen units, driving screws into MDF, drilling holes, rarely out of my
    hand except when I was on the sawbench. Two battery changes a day max,
    usually only one. It also lasted me the year between buying it and leaving
    the job without noticable deterioration of the batteries. No keyless chuck
    on that baby. Two-speed, also with variable speed trigger. Extremely
    accurate controllable speed.

    Ok, it cost over $300 trade, on special. However, that was maybe 10 years
    ago. I gave it to my dad when I left the job as he then had more use for it
    than I did and he'd always coveted it. I've always hoped for the price of
    excellent quality drills like this to come down as the battery technology
    got better. However, it doesn't seem to have happened at all and I've never
    had anything like it since, despite buying around 5 moderately priced drills
    since. (Hard to justify a tradesman's tool for around-the-house use on my
    budget.)

    Wish I still have a drill like that, it could give your wrist a nasty twist
    if it jammed and you weren't ready for it. Almost never needed to get the
    mains-powered drill out. 10 years on, the $80, 14.4V drill that I have now
    never had 1/4 the power of the old Makita and is as good as useless after
    doing less work in a year than the Makita did in a day (for a year).

    So much for progress.
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Feb 20, 2007
    #15
  16. Mathew Good

    El Chippy Guest

    Re: SUB C Nicad Batteries

    On Tue, 20 Feb 2007 20:56:18 +1300, ~misfit~ wrote:

    > Don Hills wrote:


    >>
    >> It depends. If you're rebuilding power tool batteries, you need NiCd.
    >> NiMH cells have a higher internal resistance than NiCd, which is
    >> important for very high peak drain applications such as power tools,
    >> R/C models etc.

    >
    > Thanks for that Don. I'd wondered why I hadn't seen any NiMH cordless
    > drills. The cheap NiCad ones I keep buying end up with stuffed batteries
    > after a year (usually only being used a half-dozen times).


    Plenty of NiMH cordless tools around, the best cordless drill i ever used
    was a panasonic with 15.6v Ni-MH batteries. Was a year or so old when i
    started at the company and still going strong 3 years later when i left.
    Damn thing almost twisted itself out of your hand if the bit ever
    hung up on something. Only thing i didnt like was the damn keyless chuck,
    would have prefered a decent keyed chuck.
    El Chippy, Feb 21, 2007
    #16
  17. Mathew Good

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Re: SUB C Nicad Batteries

    El Chippy wrote:
    > On Tue, 20 Feb 2007 20:56:18 +1300, ~misfit~ wrote:
    >
    > > Don Hills wrote:

    >
    > > >
    > > > It depends. If you're rebuilding power tool batteries, you need
    > > > NiCd. NiMH cells have a higher internal resistance than NiCd,
    > > > which is important for very high peak drain applications such as
    > > > power tools, R/C models etc.

    > >
    > > Thanks for that Don. I'd wondered why I hadn't seen any NiMH
    > > cordless drills. The cheap NiCad ones I keep buying end up with
    > > stuffed batteries after a year (usually only being used a
    > > half-dozen times).

    >
    > Plenty of NiMH cordless tools around, the best cordless drill i ever
    > used was a panasonic with 15.6v Ni-MH batteries. Was a year or so
    > old when i started at the company and still going strong 3 years
    > later when i left. Damn thing almost twisted itself out of your hand
    > if the bit ever
    > hung up on something. Only thing i didnt like was the damn keyless
    > chuck, would have prefered a decent keyed chuck.


    Ahh, Ok, thanks. I'm not looking at tradesman-level tools (My engineer mate
    swears by Panasonic cordless'), they're way out of my price-range. I just
    thought, with Ni-MH being so common now that it would have trickled down to
    handyman type tools. I mean, other than specialised applications, who uses
    NiCad any more? They're no cheaper than Ni-MH, have less capacity:size and
    have major 'memory' problems.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Feb 21, 2007
    #17
  18. Mathew Good

    Jerry Guest

    El Chippy wrote:
    > On Mon, 19 Feb 2007 20:00:45 +1300, Mathew Good <mg wrote:
    >
    >> I have brought some 2/3 A ones some time back and can't seem to find the firm that I got them from,
    >> but I am now after some SUB C Nicads at some 1500mha or larger.
    >>
    >>
    >> Any one know of a NZ firm that has some in stock..
    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > Try Tesa electronics in Penrose, Auckland. http://www.tesa.co.nz. They
    > have good range of batteries, and repack powertool battery packs so should
    > have most of the non-consumer sizes.
    >
    > Not sure about NiCd tho, aren't they are dead technology? why not switch
    > to NiMH?


    There is some good stuff about batteries at

    http://batteryuniversity.com/
    Jerry, Feb 21, 2007
    #18
  19. Mathew Good

    Richard Guest

    Re: SUB C Nicad Batteries

    Don Hills wrote:

    > 18 or 24 volt? I'll bet there's a warning on the battery to let it cool down
    > before recharging, too.
    > The trend to higher voltages annoys me a bit. It just hastens the eventual
    > death of the battery as there are more cells to develop capacity
    > differences. I had an old Ryobi Tradeline 7.2 volt drill that had more
    > torque than an 18 volt De Walt. The Ryobi would push a long 13 mm wood bit
    > through two fenceposts back to back and then tighten a lag bolt into the
    > hole, but a dual-speed 18 volt De Walt? Nah.
    >
    > I still have the Ryobi, the battery died long ago but I notice Jaycar have
    > them in stock... about $100 for a battery? It had better be good.


    Now you got me, its not here at the moment but I think it was 14.4 or
    18, defiantly not 24

    de walts gone to crap since the B&D buyout, and wasn't much better
    beforehand.

    miwake is what people I know that get their power tools in the states
    swear by now.
    Richard, Feb 21, 2007
    #19
  20. Mathew Good

    EMB Guest

    Re: SUB C Nicad Batteries

    El Chippy wrote:

    > Plenty of NiMH cordless tools around, the best cordless drill i ever used
    > was a panasonic with 15.6v Ni-MH batteries. Was a year or so old when i
    > started at the company and still going strong 3 years later when i left.
    > Damn thing almost twisted itself out of your hand if the bit ever
    > hung up on something. Only thing i didnt like was the damn keyless chuck,
    > would have prefered a decent keyed chuck.


    I've had 2 of them (only one left after some bastard stole one) - bloody
    marvelous drills. They've just kept going through all the abuse I've
    thrown at them over the last 4 years. Cheapest place to buy them that
    I've seen recently was Ideal Electrical who had them priced at $500 on
    promotion.


    --
    EMB
    EMB, Feb 21, 2007
    #20
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