Stupid Safety Question About Photograghing Sunsets

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by pmoscatello@comcast.net, Jun 20, 2008.

  1. Guest

    , Jun 20, 2008
    #1
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  2. Stewy Guest

    In article
    <>,
    wrote:

    > I bought a Nikon Coolpix L11 a while back and I'm very happy with it.
    > http://www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/Product/Digital-Camera/25563/COOLPIX-L
    > 11.html
    >
    > What I'd like to know:
    > Is it safe to look directly at the sun through the LCD viewing screen
    > while taking many sunset photos?
    >

    I've been photographing sunsets since buying my first digital in 2001.
    I've never encountered any problems. If it's too bright to look at -
    more than 2 or 3 diameters from the horizon, then wait. If you can look
    directly for a second or so and have an afterimage but nothing more,
    then there's no problem.

    Remember that clouds make the most spectacular sunsets - in western
    Scotland it often rains mid-afternoon making this area the most
    beautiful for sunsets.
     
    Stewy, Jun 20, 2008
    #2
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  3. wrote:
    > I bought a Nikon Coolpix L11 a while back and I'm very happy with it.
    > http://www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/Product/Digital-Camera/25563/COOLPIX-L11.html
    >
    > What I'd like to know:
    > Is it safe to look directly at the sun through the LCD viewing screen
    > while taking many sunset photos?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Phil


    You aren't looking /through/ the LCD screen, but "at" it. So it's OK.

    However, be aware that in certain circumstances, an image of the sun can
    damage the sensor (more precisely, the all-important colour filter bonded
    to the front of the sensor), so you would be wise to minimise the time the
    camera points at the sun, especially if it doesn't have a visible shutter
    across the front of the lens when switched off.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jun 20, 2008
    #3
  4. David J Taylor wrote:

    > wrote:
    >> I bought a Nikon Coolpix L11 a while back and I'm very happy with it.
    >> http://www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/Product/Digital-Camera/25563/COOLPIX-L11.html
    >>
    >> What I'd like to know:
    >> Is it safe to look directly at the sun through the LCD viewing screen
    >> while taking many sunset photos?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Phil

    >
    > You aren't looking /through/ the LCD screen, but "at" it. So it's OK.


    On the other hand, if they *could* make LCDs as bright as the sun we could
    finally easily see the damned things on sunny days. :)


    --
    Blinky
    Is your ISP dropping Usenet?
    Need a new feed?
    http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html
     
    Blinky the Shark, Jun 20, 2008
    #4
  5. Blinky the Shark wrote:
    []
    > On the other hand, if they *could* make LCDs as bright as the sun we
    > could finally easily see the damned things on sunny days. :)


    My GPS has a transreflective colour LCD, and I have no difficulty seeing
    that on the sunniest of days - the sunnier the better.....

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jun 20, 2008
    #5
  6. Guest

    On Jun 20, 2:18 am, "David J Taylor" <-
    this-bit.nor-this-bit.co.uk> wrote:

    > You aren't looking /through/ the LCD screen, but "at" it.  So it's OK.
    >
    > David


    Exactly, looking at the LCD screen is correct. If I were looking
    through it, it wouldn't be safe. It seems to me that looking at the
    LCD screen is about as safe as watching a sunset cam on a computer.

    Phil
     
    , Jun 20, 2008
    #6
  7. Marvin Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:

    >
    > You aren't looking /through/ the LCD screen, but "at" it. So it's OK.
    >
    > However, be aware that in certain circumstances, an image of the sun can
    > damage the sensor (more precisely, the all-important colour filter bonded
    > to the front of the sensor), so you would be wise to minimise the time the
    > camera points at the sun, especially if it doesn't have a visible shutter
    > across the front of the lens when switched off.
    >
    > David
    >
    >

    That is why I take sunset pictures after sunset or when the
    sun is behind a cloud. My rule of thumb is that I shouldn't
    point the camera at a light that is too bright for me to
    stare at.
     
    Marvin, Jun 20, 2008
    #7
  8. On Jun 19, 9:02 pm, wrote:
    > I bought a Nikon Coolpix L11 a while back and I'm very happy with it.http://www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/Product/Digital-Camera/25563/...
    >
    > What I'd like to know:
    > Is it safe to look directly at the sun through the LCD viewing screen
    > while taking many sunset photos?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Phil


    Safe for you or the camera?
     
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Jun 20, 2008
    #8
  9. On Jun 19, 9:02 pm, wrote:
    > I bought a Nikon Coolpix L11 a while back and I'm very happy with it.http://www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/Product/Digital-Camera/25563/...
    >
    > What I'd like to know:
    > Is it safe to look directly at the sun through the LCD viewing screen
    > while taking many sunset photos?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Phil


    Sorry, I bumped the enter key accidently.

    It is safe for you, but may NOT be safe for camera.

    The imaging chip itself can withstand sun viewing for awhile with
    higher f/#s but the filters, as someone else said, may be damaged more
    easily. Again it would depend on the relative aperture of your lens.
    A fast lens would probably burn a filter pretty fast. However, if the
    sun is low down right at horizon, the solar radiance is also
    attenuated. So the camera is at risk but how much depends on how long
    it is pointed at sun and how high the f/# is. This says cheaper
    cameras may be safer than more expensive ones with faster lenses :)

    Personally if I were taking a sunset picture with the sun above the
    horizon I would use a neutral density filter on the lens.
     
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Jun 20, 2008
    #9
  10. Paul Furman Guest

    Mike Beede wrote:
    > In article
    > <>,
    > Don Stauffer in Minnesota <> wrote:
    >
    >> The imaging chip itself can withstand sun viewing for awhile with
    >> higher f/#s but the filters, as someone else said, may be damaged more
    >> easily.

    >
    > I thought the camera only stopped down briefly before taking
    > a picture, not while composing. I know that's the way it
    > works with an SLR, but don't know anything much about how
    > other kinds of digital cameras work. Are there cameras that
    > stop down during preview?


    P&S models or DSLRs with live view work that way.

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Jun 21, 2008
    #10
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