Studio Set Up

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by picture parade, Sep 24, 2004.

  1. Im trying to set up a studio on my desktop for small things such as coins,
    set up shots etc not massive things but bowl size objects. Any idea on the
    type of light i should try and what cloth etc. a full kit may be the answer
     
    picture parade, Sep 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. I am currently awaiting delivery of a cloth balloon that is designed for jus
    that sort of thing. For less I have used a shower curtain from a dollar
    store....foamcore for reflectors. Video floods from a thrift store. Halogen
    desk lamps. Shop lamps....anything that puts out light. Try window puts out
    light from one side...not sunbeams but soft light. Put the shower curtain
    between window and object...and foamcore on opposite side. Might not need
    electrical light.


    "picture parade" <> wrote in message
    news:b4W4d.1032$...
    > Im trying to set up a studio on my desktop for small things such as coins,
    > set up shots etc not massive things but bowl size objects. Any idea on the
    > type of light i should try and what cloth etc. a full kit may be the

    answer
    >
    >
     
    Gene Palmiter, Sep 24, 2004
    #2
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  3. picture parade

    Hunt Guest

    In article <b4W4d.1032$>,
    says...
    >
    >Im trying to set up a studio on my desktop for small things such as coins,
    >set up shots etc not massive things but bowl size objects. Any idea on the
    >type of light i should try and what cloth etc. a full kit may be the answer
    >


    You might want to take a look at some of the gear that Calumet Photo (www.
    calumetphoto.com) offers from several sources. One that I've used is the
    ImperiumDome, made by Gary Register in CO. Basically a collapsible white tent,
    with shock-corded support rods and a white floor. It is small, and has
    velcro'ed openings for lights, or cameras around it. I don't know if it is
    still being built, or if Register is still in business, but the unit is/was
    very good, and folds into a small travel/storage bag. If you light from
    outside, tungsten or strobe can be used. If you mount a light in the top, you
    will need strobe.

    Also, Publishing Prefection (www.publishingprefection.com [?]) has an all
    inclusive digital light chamber background unit, but I've never used it.

    As for background, if you use say a velvet, just know that the cloth will go
    very dark in an evenly lit situation, and any detail in it will have to be
    generated by highlight producing instruments placed low to the plane of the
    cloth. I'd say go with a less light absorbant material and use it for color,
    rather than texture.

    Just some thoughts...
    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Sep 24, 2004
    #3
  4. picture parade

    Frank ess Guest

    picture parade wrote:
    > Im trying to set up a studio on my desktop for small things such as
    > coins, set up shots etc not massive things but bowl size objects. Any
    > idea on the type of light i should try and what cloth etc. a full kit
    > may be the answer


    "Quick and Dirty" but it works:

    · A piece of gray-faced Foamcore™ heated and bent 90 degrees at a
    1/3-2/3 proportion

    · Ott-light clamp-on desk lamp (I prefer diffused sunlight in the patio,
    but I presume you are talking about around-the-clock use...)

    · Table-top tripod

    It all fits on a desk-top, sets up and stows away in a minute. If the
    Ott-light needs diffusion, a sheet of high-brilliance copy paper can be
    hung from it.

    Here's a three-year-old one under just those^ circumstances, from a
    CP995 Nikon:
    http://www.fototime.com/0DB16848BB161BC/orig.jpg

    Today I might set up a couple folded-paper reflectors, but the photo you
    see there was in the Web-posting process ten minutes after I decided to
    make it.

    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Sep 24, 2004
    #4
  5. picture parade

    Alan Meyer Guest

    "picture parade" <> wrote in message
    news:b4W4d.1032$...
    > ... Any idea on the
    > type of light i should try ...


    Of course one great thing about most digital cameras
    today is that you can set the white balance yourself. So
    you don't have the same problems matching "color
    temperature" with film that photographers had in the
    past. That should greatly increase your options for
    lighting.

    Alan
     
    Alan Meyer, Sep 24, 2004
    #5
  6. picture parade

    Alan Browne Guest

    Alan Meyer wrote:

    > you don't have the same problems matching "color
    > temperature" with film that photographers had in the
    > past.


    Whaddya mean "had in the past." We still have this problem!


    --
    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Sep 24, 2004
    #6
  7. picture parade

    Alan Browne Guest

    Frank ess wrote:

    > picture parade wrote:
    >
    >>Im trying to set up a studio on my desktop for small things such as
    >>coins, set up shots etc not massive things but bowl size objects. Any
    >>idea on the type of light i should try and what cloth etc. a full kit
    >>may be the answer

    >
    >
    > "Quick and Dirty" but it works:
    >
    > · A piece of gray-faced Foamcore™ heated and bent 90 degrees at a
    > 1/3-2/3 proportion
    >
    > · Ott-light clamp-on desk lamp (I prefer diffused sunlight in the patio,
    > but I presume you are talking about around-the-clock use...)
    >
    > · Table-top tripod
    >
    > It all fits on a desk-top, sets up and stows away in a minute. If the
    > Ott-light needs diffusion, a sheet of high-brilliance copy paper can be
    > hung from it.
    >
    > Here's a three-year-old one under just those^ circumstances, from a
    > CP995 Nikon:
    > http://www.fototime.com/0DB16848BB161BC/orig.jpg


    Too dark at the bottom of the car IMO. Otherwise very nice.

    How did you heat the foam core ... is a hairdryer hot enough?
    What was the aprox radius of the bend?

    Cheers,
    Alan

    --
    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Sep 24, 2004
    #7
  8. picture parade

    Alan Browne Guest

    picture parade wrote:

    > Im trying to set up a studio on my desktop for small things such as coins,
    > set up shots etc not massive things but bowl size objects. Any idea on the
    > type of light i should try and what cloth etc. a full kit may be the answer


    Difuse lighting coming from several directions is advised for most subjects,
    except coins. Strobes are preferable via softboxes or a light tent, but hot
    lights work well, esp. with digital cameras. A curved up surface to avoid lines
    is a good idea.

    Cheap, thin white cotton sheets are good difusers, as is thin white plastic.
    The larger the surface and the closer to the subject, the softer the effect.

    To get surface detail of a coin, make sure there are no reflections from a light
    source on the surface of the coin from the camera POV. So if shooting them
    flat, the light sources should be at least 45 deg off the lens axis. If the
    surface detail is predominantly important, then reduce to one light source with
    less difusion and shoot it at low angle to the surface (20 deg or so), this will
    bring the surface detail out. ( http://www.pbase.com/image/23707346 as you can
    see the shot had a softbox above that resulted in too much reflection off some
    of the coins... this shot was not part of a 'sales' shot, however).

    Cheers,
    Alan

    --
    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Sep 24, 2004
    #8
  9. picture parade

    Frank ess Guest

    Alan Browne wrote:
    > Frank ess wrote:
    >
    >> picture parade wrote:
    >>
    >>> Im trying to set up a studio on my desktop for small things such as
    >>> coins, set up shots etc not massive things but bowl size objects.
    >>> Any idea on the type of light i should try and what cloth etc. a
    >>> full kit may be the answer

    >>
    >>
    >> "Quick and Dirty" but it works:
    >>
    >> · A piece of gray-faced Foamcore™ heated and bent 90 degrees at a
    >> 1/3-2/3 proportion
    >>
    >> · Ott-light clamp-on desk lamp (I prefer diffused sunlight in the
    >> patio, but I presume you are talking about around-the-clock use...)
    >>
    >> · Table-top tripod
    >>
    >> It all fits on a desk-top, sets up and stows away in a minute. If the
    >> Ott-light needs diffusion, a sheet of high-brilliance copy paper can
    >> be hung from it.
    >>
    >> Here's a three-year-old one under just those^ circumstances, from a
    >> CP995 Nikon:
    >> http://www.fototime.com/0DB16848BB161BC/orig.jpg

    >
    > Too dark at the bottom of the car IMO. Otherwise very nice.
    >
    > How did you heat the foam core ... is a hairdryer hot enough?
    > What was the aprox radius of the bend?
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Alan


    I agree about "Too dark..." I think a reflector might have made a
    sufficient difference.

    As when I took the photo, impatience influenced the outcome of the foam
    core bend: next time I do it I'll make it larger than the approx.
    half-inch radius. A few of my sunlight photos make the transition more
    obvious than I like, and it seems to me a 1-inch or greater radius would
    be better. A radius larger than that would be nearer the ideal, but on
    the scales I work at, the platform size is satisfactory (20X20-inch
    base, 10X20 'wall' ). A larger bend might require a larger piece of
    material with attendant storage problems.

    I have a paint-stripper heat gun left over from a previous life. It is
    not easy to regulate the blast or the bend. Some light cuts in the
    reverse side of the foamcore would reduce resistance to the bend, as the
    paper on that side needs to stretch a bit. Once the foam cools off, it
    holds its shape, so it is important to keep the flat parts flat, too.

    Next time, another set of hands and a template of some sort will make it
    easier and more 'professional'.

    I don't know if a hair dryer is hot enough.

    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Sep 24, 2004
    #9
  10. picture parade

    Charlie Self Guest

    Frank Ess responds:

    >nd it seems to me a 1-inch or greater radius would
    >be better. A radius larger than that would be nearer the ideal, but on
    >the scales I work at, the platform size is satisfactory (20X20-inch
    >base, 10X20 'wall' ). A larger bend might require a larger piece of
    >material with attendant storage problems.
    >

    Bendable plywood exists. Shape it as needed, paint it whatever color you like,
    and that's it. Almost any radius.

    >I have a paint-stripper heat gun left over from a previous life. It is
    >not easy to regulate the blast or the bend. Some light cuts in the
    >reverse side of the foamcore would reduce resistance to the bend, as the
    >paper on that side needs to stretch a bit. Once the foam cools off, it
    >holds its shape, so it is important to keep the flat parts flat, too.
    >
    >Next time, another set of hands and a template of some sort will make it
    >easier and more 'professional'.
    >
    >I don't know if a hair dryer is hot enough.


    A hair dryer probably is not hot enough. My pro heat gun is a devil of a lot
    hotter than my wife's hair dryer when both are working at full blast.


    Charlie Self
    "Half of the American people have never read a newspaper. Half never voted for
    President. One hopes it is the same half." Gore Vidal
     
    Charlie Self, Sep 25, 2004
    #10
  11. picture parade

    Frank ess Guest

    Charlie Self wrote:
    > Frank Ess responds:
    >
    >> nd it seems to me a 1-inch or greater radius would
    >> be better. A radius larger than that would be nearer the ideal, but
    >> on
    >> the scales I work at, the platform size is satisfactory (20X20-inch
    >> base, 10X20 'wall' ). A larger bend might require a larger piece of
    >> material with attendant storage problems.
    >>

    > Bendable plywood exists. Shape it as needed, paint it whatever color
    > you like, and that's it. Almost any radius.
    >


    Thank you. I didn't know about that. Still, I like the light weight and
    pick-your-color aspect of Foamcore. The piece I'm using is starting to
    show some obtrusive dings. If it were plywood a litlle paint would bring
    it up to standard. Maybe I'm about ready for another craftsy episode...

    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Sep 25, 2004
    #11
  12. Drywall gets flexible when damp...and there is mud to even it out.


    "Frank ess" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Charlie Self wrote:
    > > Frank Ess responds:
    > >
    > >> nd it seems to me a 1-inch or greater radius would
    > >> be better. A radius larger than that would be nearer the ideal, but
    > >> on
    > >> the scales I work at, the platform size is satisfactory (20X20-inch
    > >> base, 10X20 'wall' ). A larger bend might require a larger piece of
    > >> material with attendant storage problems.
    > >>

    > > Bendable plywood exists. Shape it as needed, paint it whatever color
    > > you like, and that's it. Almost any radius.
    > >

    >
    > Thank you. I didn't know about that. Still, I like the light weight and
    > pick-your-color aspect of Foamcore. The piece I'm using is starting to
    > show some obtrusive dings. If it were plywood a litlle paint would bring
    > it up to standard. Maybe I'm about ready for another craftsy episode...
    >
    > --
    > Frank ess
    >
    >
     
    Gene Palmiter, Sep 25, 2004
    #12
  13. picture parade

    Frank ess Guest

    Gene Palmiter wrote:
    > Drywall gets flexible when damp...and there is mud to even it out.
    >
    >


    Hm. My son-in-law's brother has a construction company. Perhaps I can
    get him to do something in brick...

    Earthquakes in this part of the country. I dunno.
     
    Frank ess, Sep 25, 2004
    #13
  14. picture parade

    Charlie Self Guest

    Frank ess notes:

    >Hm. My son-in-law's brother has a construction company. Perhaps I can
    >get him to do something in brick...
    >
    >Earthquakes in this part of the country. I dunno.


    Depending on sizes needed...http://www.vandykes.com/product/02007822/

    Small, possibly useful. A google search will turn up dozens, maybe hundreds,
    more in a variety of sizes.

    Charlie Self
    "Half of the American people have never read a newspaper. Half never voted for
    President. One hopes it is the same half." Gore Vidal
     
    Charlie Self, Sep 25, 2004
    #14
  15. picture parade

    Frank ess Guest

    Charlie Self wrote:
    > Frank ess notes:
    >
    >> Hm. My son-in-law's brother has a construction company. Perhaps I can
    >> get him to do something in brick...
    >>
    >> Earthquakes in this part of the country. I dunno.

    >
    > Depending on sizes needed...http://www.vandykes.com/product/02007822/
    >
    > Small, possibly useful. A google search will turn up dozens, maybe
    > hundreds, more in a variety of sizes.
    >


    That's good. Thank you. I'll see if there is a local supplier I can
    approach.

    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Sep 26, 2004
    #15
  16. picture parade

    Charlie Self Guest

    Frank Ess notes:

    >> Depending on sizes needed...http://www.vandykes.com/product/02007822/
    >>
    >> Small, possibly useful. A google search will turn up dozens, maybe
    >> hundreds, more in a variety of sizes.
    >>

    >
    >That's good. Thank you. I'll see if there is a local supplier I can
    >approach.


    Check local cabinetmaker's supply companies, possible listed as hardwood or
    plywood dealers.

    Good luck.

    Charlie Self
    "Half of the American people have never read a newspaper. Half never voted for
    President. One hopes it is the same half." Gore Vidal
     
    Charlie Self, Sep 26, 2004
    #16
  17. I just got a Digital Lighthouse from B&H. It looks like just the thing. I
    will be doing a jewelry and silver catalogue...same problems. It Light house
    wasn't too dear. It will work with any light as the light is outside the
    Lighthouse.

    "picture parade" <> wrote in message
    news:b4W4d.1032$...
    > Im trying to set up a studio on my desktop for small things such as coins,
    > set up shots etc not massive things but bowl size objects. Any idea on the
    > type of light i should try and what cloth etc. a full kit may be the

    answer
    >
    >
     
    Gene Palmiter, Sep 26, 2004
    #17
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