Streaming/recording video

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Nik Coughin, Jul 23, 2004.

  1. Nik Coughin

    Nik Coughin Guest

    OK, no lectures on multi-posting please. I posted this to
    comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video before, but I in retrospect I don't think it
    gets enough traffic for anyone to answer my question, so I'm going to ask it
    here instead. This has only just occurred to me otherwise I wouldn't have
    posted in CSIPHV in the first place.

    A friend of mine want to be able to stream and record onto the hard disk of
    a p3-733 from a Canon VC-C4 video camera. What kind of graphics card will
    he need to buy to do it? Anything else that he should know, any tips?
    Please let me know if you need more information and I will ask him.

    TIA

    Nik Coughlin

    --
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    http://www.nrkn.com/
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
     
    Nik Coughin, Jul 23, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Nik Coughin

    JohnO Guest

    "Nik Coughin" <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote in message
    news:4F%Lc.3784$...
    > OK, no lectures on multi-posting please. I posted this to
    > comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video before, but I in retrospect I don't think

    it
    > gets enough traffic for anyone to answer my question, so I'm going to ask

    it
    > here instead. This has only just occurred to me otherwise I wouldn't have
    > posted in CSIPHV in the first place.
    >
    > A friend of mine want to be able to stream and record onto the hard disk

    of
    > a p3-733 from a Canon VC-C4 video camera. What kind of graphics card will
    > he need to buy to do it? Anything else that he should know, any tips?
    > Please let me know if you need more information and I will ask him.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Nik Coughlin
    >
    > --
    > -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    > http://www.nrkn.com/
    > -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    >
    >


    Is that a digital camcorder with an IEEE1395 (FireWire) port? If so you are
    best to use a firewire card. That will capture to uncompressed AVI IIRC, and
    you then need one of many free apps around to convert to MPEG. Pretty hard
    work on a pIII-733 though so it will take a while to chug through it and you
    need many gigs of disk space for the uncompressed video.

    If it is not digital, then I'd recommend a hardware MPEG encoding card, such
    as Hauppauge PVR-250 or perhaps the Pixelview PlayTV@P7000.

    Alternatively some of the USB2 devices such as pinacle PCTVPro Deluxe would
    also work and can be used with laptops.
     
    JohnO, Jul 23, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Nik Coughin

    Nik Coughin Guest

    JohnO wrote:
    >
    > Is that a digital camcorder with an IEEE1395 (FireWire) port? If so
    > you are best to use a firewire card. That will capture to
    > uncompressed AVI IIRC, and you then need one of many free apps around
    > to convert to MPEG. Pretty hard work on a pIII-733 though so it will
    > take a while to chug through it and you need many gigs of disk space
    > for the uncompressed video.
    >


    Yes, it is digital. I should think it has firewire, it's a pretty expensive
    camera, but I haven't seen it myself. They are going to be recording 1.5-2
    hours per session, up to three sessions in a row, with 10 minute breaks in
    between. So we're talking maybe 6 hours of uncompressed AVI, I shudder to
    think of how much disk space that would eat up. Is there a card that he can
    use that does hardware mpeg2 encoding or something? This is the camera, if
    it helps:

    http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ModelFeaturesAct&fcategoryid=158&modelid=7402
     
    Nik Coughin, Jul 23, 2004
    #3
  4. Nik Coughin

    JohnO Guest

    "Nik Coughin" <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote in message
    news:T10Mc.3795$...
    > JohnO wrote:
    > >
    > > Is that a digital camcorder with an IEEE1395 (FireWire) port? If so
    > > you are best to use a firewire card. That will capture to
    > > uncompressed AVI IIRC, and you then need one of many free apps around
    > > to convert to MPEG. Pretty hard work on a pIII-733 though so it will
    > > take a while to chug through it and you need many gigs of disk space
    > > for the uncompressed video.
    > >

    >
    > Yes, it is digital. I should think it has firewire, it's a pretty

    expensive
    > camera, but I haven't seen it myself. They are going to be recording

    1.5-2
    > hours per session, up to three sessions in a row, with 10 minute breaks in
    > between. So we're talking maybe 6 hours of uncompressed AVI, I shudder to
    > think of how much disk space that would eat up. Is there a card that he

    can
    > use that does hardware mpeg2 encoding or something? This is the camera,

    if
    > it helps:
    >
    >

    http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ModelFeaturesAct&fcategoryid=158&modelid=7402
    >
    >


    I don't know of any MPEG card that can use IEEE1394 input, unfortunately.

    The next best option with a basic IEEE1394 card is to encode on the fly so
    that the raw AVI is not stored. A PIII-733 would be hard pressed to keep up,
    but the software could start and stop the tape. So that depends on the
    functionality of the software. The freebie movie stuff with windowsXP
    doesn't do encode on the fly. Maybe a google would turn up something.

    Otherwise you could go down the route of an MPEG encoder such as the
    PVR-250, but you are bound to lose a little additional quality converting
    digital AVI to composite or S video. Those cards generally come with free
    windows software to read from the card direct to MPEG files. The MPEG stream
    is probably only 2-3 Gb/hr.
     
    JohnO, Jul 23, 2004
    #4
  5. Nik Coughin

    Nik Coughin Guest

    JohnO wrote:
    > "Nik Coughin" <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote in message
    > news:T10Mc.3795$...
    >> JohnO wrote:

    > The next best option with a basic IEEE1394 card is to encode on the
    > fly so that the raw AVI is not stored. A PIII-733 would be hard
    > pressed to keep up, but the software could start and stop the tape.
    > So that depends on the functionality of the software. The freebie
    > movie stuff with windowsXP doesn't do encode on the fly. Maybe a
    > google would turn up something.
    >
    > Otherwise you could go down the route of an MPEG encoder such as the
    > PVR-250, but you are bound to lose a little additional quality
    > converting digital AVI to composite or S video. Those cards generally
    > come with free windows software to read from the card direct to MPEG
    > files. The MPEG stream is probably only 2-3 Gb/hr.


    Thanks so much John!

    I just talked to him about it and he said that he's going to try and get
    access to a better machine. Do you have any idea how powerful it will need
    to be? Stopping and starting the tape is not an option because it will be
    live video, not from a tape.
     
    Nik Coughin, Jul 23, 2004
    #5
  6. On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 16:16:47 +1200, "Nik Coughin"
    <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote:

    >JohnO wrote:
    >> "Nik Coughin" <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote in message
    >> news:T10Mc.3795$...
    >>> JohnO wrote:

    >> The next best option with a basic IEEE1394 card is to encode on the
    >> fly so that the raw AVI is not stored. A PIII-733 would be hard
    >> pressed to keep up, but the software could start and stop the tape.
    >> So that depends on the functionality of the software. The freebie
    >> movie stuff with windowsXP doesn't do encode on the fly. Maybe a
    >> google would turn up something.
    >>
    >> Otherwise you could go down the route of an MPEG encoder such as the
    >> PVR-250, but you are bound to lose a little additional quality
    >> converting digital AVI to composite or S video. Those cards generally
    >> come with free windows software to read from the card direct to MPEG
    >> files. The MPEG stream is probably only 2-3 Gb/hr.

    >
    >Thanks so much John!
    >
    >I just talked to him about it and he said that he's going to try and get
    >access to a better machine. Do you have any idea how powerful it will need
    >to be? Stopping and starting the tape is not an option because it will be
    >live video, not from a tape.


    The more processor power the better for handling video. A reasonable
    amount of RAM is also required (I have 512 Mybtes with Win2k and that
    is fine). And for 6 hours of uncompressed AVI files at a time, I
    would be looking at 400+ Gbyte hard disks. Uncompressed AVI files are
    in the Gbyte per minute region. If you want a really top-notch
    result, you really do need to get the uncompressed AVI onto hard disk
    and then process it on the main CPU. I only have an Athlon XP2100+,
    and I can not process uncompressed AVI into anything useful in
    realtime - it has to be done at less than real time for a useful
    result.

    I use TMPGEnc for converting AVI files to MPEG. It is a very
    configurable program and does a good job. I use VirtualDub or
    VirtualDubMod for converting files to DivX AVIs. Again, excellent
    configurable programs, and free.

    I can process video input from my capture card to Huffy compressed AVI
    files in real time. The Huffy codec does lossless compression and
    halves the file sizes, but I do not know of any software which will
    read a Firewire video stream and do Huffy compression on it on the
    fly. Which is not to say such software does not exist - I have just
    not run across it. If you can find a Firewire card with the right
    drivers, then VirtualDub would do a Huffy capture for you, but cards
    with the right drivers seem few and far between.

    TMPGEnc (freeware version, MPEG-1 only):
    http://www.tmpgenc.net

    TMPGEnc (shareware (1 month trial) / pay version, does MPEG-2):
    http://www.pegasys-inc.com

    VirtualDub:
    http://www.virtualdub.org

    VirtualDubMod:
    http://virtualdubmod.sf.net
     
    Stephen Worthington, Jul 23, 2004
    #6
  7. Nik Coughin

    Brett Guest

    On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 15:30:14 +1200, "Nik Coughin"
    <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote:

    >OK, no lectures on multi-posting please. I posted this to
    >comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video before, but I in retrospect I don't think it
    >gets enough traffic for anyone to answer my question, so I'm going to ask it
    >here instead. This has only just occurred to me otherwise I wouldn't have
    >posted in CSIPHV in the first place.


    Hello to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video from new zealands nz.comp.

    >A friend of mine want to be able to stream and record onto the hard disk of
    >a p3-733 from a Canon VC-C4 video camera. What kind of graphics card will
    >he need to buy to do it? Anything else that he should know, any tips?
    >Please let me know if you need more information and I will ask him.
    >
    >TIA
    >
    >Nik Coughlin


    it's not just the graphic card that you need to think about as your want
    both audio and video encoding, Then you have to consider what is your
    'streaming' bandwidth (dialup?). AGP does have a big fat bus to get good
    data, a 733mhz would render 640x512 video at 20fps with out dropping too
    many frames. Then there is the audio stream sound quality, it a 2nd
    process totally.

    So you should look at codec's for what your stream format will be.
    100mbps fiber internet isp connection would be great too.

    Streaming sucks it's like tv with no content controlled,
    Pre viewable Movie downloads, is a much bettar style.
     
    Brett, Jul 23, 2004
    #7
  8. Nik Coughin

    Brett Guest

    On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 15:47:09 +1200, "JohnO" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Nik Coughin" <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote in message
    >news:4F%Lc.3784$...
    >> OK, no lectures on multi-posting please. I posted this to
    >> comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video before, but I in retrospect I don't think

    >it
    >> gets enough traffic for anyone to answer my question, so I'm going to ask

    >it
    >> here instead. This has only just occurred to me otherwise I wouldn't have
    >> posted in CSIPHV in the first place.
    >>
    >> A friend of mine want to be able to stream and record onto the hard disk

    >of
    >> a p3-733 from a Canon VC-C4 video camera. What kind of graphics card will
    >> he need to buy to do it? Anything else that he should know, any tips?
    >> Please let me know if you need more information and I will ask him.
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> Nik Coughlin
    >>
    >> --
    >> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    >> http://www.nrkn.com/
    >> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Is that a digital camcorder with an IEEE1395 (FireWire) port? If so you are
    >best to use a firewire card. That will capture to uncompressed AVI IIRC, and
    >you then need one of many free apps around to convert to MPEG. Pretty hard
    >work on a pIII-733 though so it will take a while to chug through it and you
    >need many gigs of disk space for the uncompressed video.
    >
    >If it is not digital, then I'd recommend a hardware MPEG encoding card, such
    >as Hauppauge PVR-250 or perhaps the Pixelview PlayTV@P7000.


    Yes, that would do the job.

    >Alternatively some of the USB2 devices such as pinacle PCTVPro Deluxe would
    >also work and can be used with laptops.


    Can usb really do it. have you got a spec review website for this one?
     
    Brett, Jul 23, 2004
    #8
  9. Nik Coughin

    Brett Guest

    On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 15:56:42 +1200, "Nik Coughin"
    <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote:

    >JohnO wrote:
    >>
    >> Is that a digital camcorder with an IEEE1395 (FireWire) port? If so
    >> you are best to use a firewire card. That will capture to
    >> uncompressed AVI IIRC, and you then need one of many free apps around
    >> to convert to MPEG. Pretty hard work on a pIII-733 though so it will
    >> take a while to chug through it and you need many gigs of disk space
    >> for the uncompressed video.
    >>

    >
    >Yes, it is digital. I should think it has firewire, it's a pretty expensive
    >camera, but I haven't seen it myself. They are going to be recording 1.5-2
    >hours per session, up to three sessions in a row, with 10 minute breaks in
    >between. So we're talking maybe 6 hours of uncompressed AVI, I shudder to
    >think of how much disk space that would eat up. Is there a card that he can
    >use that does hardware mpeg2 encoding or something? This is the camera, if
    >it helps:
    >
    >http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ModelFeaturesAct&fcategoryid=158&modelid=7402
    >


    Thanks for the document on cameras.
     
    Brett, Jul 23, 2004
    #9
  10. Nik Coughin

    JohnO Guest

    "Brett" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 15:47:09 +1200, "JohnO" <> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Nik Coughin" <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote in message
    > >news:4F%Lc.3784$...
    > >> OK, no lectures on multi-posting please. I posted this to
    > >> comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video before, but I in retrospect I don't

    think
    > >it
    > >> gets enough traffic for anyone to answer my question, so I'm going to

    ask
    > >it
    > >> here instead. This has only just occurred to me otherwise I wouldn't

    have
    > >> posted in CSIPHV in the first place.
    > >>
    > >> A friend of mine want to be able to stream and record onto the hard

    disk
    > >of
    > >> a p3-733 from a Canon VC-C4 video camera. What kind of graphics card

    will
    > >> he need to buy to do it? Anything else that he should know, any tips?
    > >> Please let me know if you need more information and I will ask him.
    > >>
    > >> TIA
    > >>
    > >> Nik Coughlin
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    > >> http://www.nrkn.com/
    > >> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >Is that a digital camcorder with an IEEE1395 (FireWire) port? If so you

    are
    > >best to use a firewire card. That will capture to uncompressed AVI IIRC,

    and
    > >you then need one of many free apps around to convert to MPEG. Pretty

    hard
    > >work on a pIII-733 though so it will take a while to chug through it and

    you
    > >need many gigs of disk space for the uncompressed video.
    > >
    > >If it is not digital, then I'd recommend a hardware MPEG encoding card,

    such
    > >as Hauppauge PVR-250 or perhaps the Pixelview PlayTV@P7000.

    >
    > Yes, that would do the job.
    >
    > >Alternatively some of the USB2 devices such as pinacle PCTVPro Deluxe

    would
    > >also work and can be used with laptops.

    >
    > Can usb really do it. have you got a spec review website for this one?


    I have used a USB2 Pinnacle PCTV external tuner - no problem, especially as
    it is already encoded to MPEG2 on the USB transfer. See:
    http://pinnaclesys.com/ProductPage_n.asp?Product_ID=1008&Langue_ID=10
     
    JohnO, Jul 23, 2004
    #10
  11. In article <>,
    lid says...
    > On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 16:16:47 +1200, "Nik Coughin"
    > <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote:
    >
    > >JohnO wrote:
    > >> "Nik Coughin" <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote in message
    > >> news:T10Mc.3795$...
    > >>> JohnO wrote:
    > >> The next best option with a basic IEEE1394 card is to encode on the
    > >> fly so that the raw AVI is not stored. A PIII-733 would be hard
    > >> pressed to keep up, but the software could start and stop the tape.
    > >> So that depends on the functionality of the software. The freebie
    > >> movie stuff with windowsXP doesn't do encode on the fly. Maybe a
    > >> google would turn up something.
    > >>
    > >> Otherwise you could go down the route of an MPEG encoder such as the
    > >> PVR-250, but you are bound to lose a little additional quality
    > >> converting digital AVI to composite or S video. Those cards generally
    > >> come with free windows software to read from the card direct to MPEG
    > >> files. The MPEG stream is probably only 2-3 Gb/hr.

    > >
    > >Thanks so much John!
    > >
    > >I just talked to him about it and he said that he's going to try and get
    > >access to a better machine. Do you have any idea how powerful it will need
    > >to be? Stopping and starting the tape is not an option because it will be
    > >live video, not from a tape.

    >
    > The more processor power the better for handling video. A reasonable
    > amount of RAM is also required (I have 512 Mybtes with Win2k and that
    > is fine). And for 6 hours of uncompressed AVI files at a time, I
    > would be looking at 400+ Gbyte hard disks. Uncompressed AVI files are
    > in the Gbyte per minute region.


    For what? the transfer standard for DV is 216 MB per minute roughly, are
    you using a format other than DV?
     
    Patrick Dunford, Jul 23, 2004
    #11
  12. Nik Coughin

    Mr Scebe Guest

    "JohnO" <> wrote in message
    news:Z90Mc.3801$...

    > The next best option with a basic IEEE1394 card is to encode on the fly so
    > that the raw AVI is not stored. A PIII-733 would be hard pressed to keep

    up,
    > but the software could start and stop the tape. So that depends on the
    > functionality of the software. The freebie movie stuff with windowsXP
    > doesn't do encode on the fly. Maybe a google would turn up something.


    Try Windows Media Encoder.
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsmedia/9series/encoder/default.aspx

    I haven't done live streaming yet, but have encoded some pre-recorded video.
    The results were very good, considering.

    --
    Mr Scebe
    Losersh always whine about their 'besht'.
    Winnersh go home and **** the prom queen".
    ~Sean Connery in "The Rock"
     
    Mr Scebe, Jul 23, 2004
    #12
  13. On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 19:45:55 +1200, Patrick Dunford
    <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > says...


    >> The more processor power the better for handling video. A reasonable
    >> amount of RAM is also required (I have 512 Mybtes with Win2k and that
    >> is fine). And for 6 hours of uncompressed AVI files at a time, I
    >> would be looking at 400+ Gbyte hard disks. Uncompressed AVI files are
    >> in the Gbyte per minute region.

    >
    >For what? the transfer standard for DV is 216 MB per minute roughly, are
    >you using a format other than DV?


    It is a while since I last used completely uncompressed AVI files (I
    normally use Huffy lossless compression), but what I remember is that
    I was getting around 1 Gbyte per minute. My memory could be wrong
    though. This was for 720x576 PAL tape capture.
     
    Stephen Worthington, Jul 23, 2004
    #13
  14. Nik Coughin

    Craig Sutton Guest

    "Brett" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 15:30:14 +1200, "Nik Coughin"
    > <nrkn!no-spam!@woosh.co.nz> wrote:
    >
    > >OK, no lectures on multi-posting please. I posted this to
    > >comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video before, but I in retrospect I don't think

    it
    > >gets enough traffic for anyone to answer my question, so I'm going to ask

    it
    > >here instead. This has only just occurred to me otherwise I wouldn't

    have
    > >posted in CSIPHV in the first place.

    >
    > Hello to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.video from new zealands nz.comp.
    >
    > >A friend of mine want to be able to stream and record onto the hard disk

    of
    > >a p3-733 from a Canon VC-C4 video camera. What kind of graphics card

    will
    > >he need to buy to do it? Anything else that he should know, any tips?
    > >Please let me know if you need more information and I will ask him.
    > >
    > >TIA
    > >
    > >Nik Coughlin

    >
    > it's not just the graphic card that you need to think about as your want
    > both audio and video encoding, Then you have to consider what is your
    > 'streaming' bandwidth (dialup?). AGP does have a big fat bus to get good
    > data, a 733mhz would render 640x512 video at 20fps with out dropping too
    > many frames. Then there is the audio stream sound quality, it a 2nd
    > process totally.
    >
    > So you should look at codec's for what your stream format will be.
    > 100mbps fiber internet isp connection would be great too.
    >
    > Streaming sucks it's like tv with no content controlled,
    > Pre viewable Movie downloads, is a much bettar style.


    Has anyone played with Videolan? I was going to get someone with 4mbitt
    conection in Taiwan to send Nasa TV over i.p for possible rebroadcast.


    http://www.videolan.org/
     
    Craig Sutton, Jul 23, 2004
    #14
  15. Nik Coughin

    Craig Shore Guest

    On Sat, 24 Jul 2004 01:41:05 +1200, Stephen Worthington <>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 19:45:55 +1200, Patrick Dunford
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <>,
    >> says...

    >
    >>> The more processor power the better for handling video. A reasonable
    >>> amount of RAM is also required (I have 512 Mybtes with Win2k and that
    >>> is fine). And for 6 hours of uncompressed AVI files at a time, I
    >>> would be looking at 400+ Gbyte hard disks. Uncompressed AVI files are
    >>> in the Gbyte per minute region.

    >>
    >>For what? the transfer standard for DV is 216 MB per minute roughly, are
    >>you using a format other than DV?

    >
    >It is a while since I last used completely uncompressed AVI files (I
    >normally use Huffy lossless compression), but what I remember is that
    >I was getting around 1 Gbyte per minute. My memory could be wrong
    >though. This was for 720x576 PAL tape capture.


    About 1185Mb/min or 71119Mb/hour. That's with CD quality/format audio.
     
    Craig Shore, Jul 23, 2004
    #15
  16. In article <>,
    lid says...
    > On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 19:45:55 +1200, Patrick Dunford
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <>,
    > > says...

    >
    > >> The more processor power the better for handling video. A reasonable
    > >> amount of RAM is also required (I have 512 Mybtes with Win2k and that
    > >> is fine). And for 6 hours of uncompressed AVI files at a time, I
    > >> would be looking at 400+ Gbyte hard disks. Uncompressed AVI files are
    > >> in the Gbyte per minute region.

    > >
    > >For what? the transfer standard for DV is 216 MB per minute roughly, are
    > >you using a format other than DV?

    >
    > It is a while since I last used completely uncompressed AVI files (I
    > normally use Huffy lossless compression), but what I remember is that
    > I was getting around 1 Gbyte per minute. My memory could be wrong
    > though. This was for 720x576 PAL tape capture.


    The rate of data for DV is 28Mbps from memory, but for all I know the
    data rate from a live data stream from a camera could well be a lot more.
     
    Patrick Dunford, Jul 23, 2004
    #16
  17. On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 22:02:28 +1200, "Mr Scebe" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"JohnO" <> wrote in message
    >news:Z90Mc.3801$...
    >
    >> The next best option with a basic IEEE1394 card is to encode on the fly so
    >> that the raw AVI is not stored. A PIII-733 would be hard pressed to keep

    >up,
    >> but the software could start and stop the tape. So that depends on the
    >> functionality of the software. The freebie movie stuff with windowsXP
    >> doesn't do encode on the fly. Maybe a google would turn up something.

    >
    >Try Windows Media Encoder.
    >http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsmedia/9series/encoder/default.aspx
    >
    >I haven't done live streaming yet, but have encoded some pre-recorded video.
    >The results were very good, considering.


    The latest Windows Media format is a variant of MPEG-4 (it was done
    from a version of the MPEG-4 standard before it was finalized). So,
    like all MPEG-4 codecs, it uses a *lot* of processor power and will
    most likely be unable to compress in real time. This is the reason
    that there are a number of MPEG-4 capable chips being released at the
    moment.

    And, yes, it does produce good results, like all MPEG-4 codecs, but if
    you are going to use MPEG-4, why not use a codec that is actually
    strictly in accordance with the MPEG-4 standard, rather than
    Microsoft's munged one?
     
    Stephen Worthington, Jul 24, 2004
    #17
  18. Nik Coughin

    Malcolm Guest

    Craig Sutton wrote:
    <snip>
    > Has anyone played with Videolan? I was going to get someone with 4mbitt
    > conection in Taiwan to send Nasa TV over i.p for possible rebroadcast.
    >
    >
    > http://www.videolan.org/


    Hi
    Have VLC up and running on a MII VIA C3-E, running RH 9.0 also have a TV
    card running as well and can send out a DVD stream to other PC's on the
    network with no apparent performance issues. Very cool...next step
    getting it up and running over wireless...

    Cheers
    Malcolm
     
    Malcolm, Jul 25, 2004
    #18
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