static route to direct to ISP possible ?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by -keevill-, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. -keevill-

    -keevill- Guest

    Here's my setup in my office/internet cafe.
    I have 2 ISP's ( we need redundancy here ) each one connected via ADSL
    modem/routers.
    One router configured on our LAN with ip 192.168.0.250 and the other one
    192.168.0.1. The latter is the 'main' ISP.
    From this router a RJ45 lan cable plugged into the LAN port feeds another
    Wireless/Router in the Internet cafe in the lower floors.
    From this router in turn is another lan cable which feeds a second wireless
    router in the cafe to give full coverage.
    Only 1 dchp server runs on the main adsl modem router ( 192.168.0.1 ).
    Office computers have fixed IP's and cafe customers obtain dynamic IP's from
    this router upstairs.
    They do not connect directly to this router as they cannot quite reach it
    wirelessly.
    THerefore they connect to either of the ones in cafe and the IP addresses
    are discovered via the router/dhcp server upstairs.
    It generally works well.
    I would like to be able to find a way to steer customers to either ISP
    according to which one is working better.
    I have tried to use a static route setting in each of the cafe wireless
    routers , one configured to 'point' to ISP A and the other to point to ISP
    B.
    I made an entry like this.

    Index Network Address Subnet Mask Gateway
    1 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.0.250

    But it does not seem to work. If I do a tracert I can see that the connected
    pc connects to the internet via the other ISP on the 192.168.0.1 IP.
    Of course I can force it by just giving a fixed IP and gateway on the
    customers machines but I prefer to tell customers to connect to a particular
    access point which would automatically route them to the Internet on the
    approp ISP>
    Is a static route entry the right way to go about this ? I just guessed it.

    Hope this is clear.
     
    -keevill-, Apr 19, 2008
    #1
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  2. I would use Dual WAN router. That doesn't only give you redundancy but also
    increase the speed. Check this link for more details.

    What's Dual WAN or Load Balance RouterA Dual WAN router or called Load
    Balance Router allows a router to use multiple paths to a destination when
    forwarding packets. With the ability to connect ...
    www.howtonetworking.com/whatis/dualwanrouter1.htm


    --
    Bob Lin, MS-MVP, MCSE & CNE
    Networking, Internet, Routing, VPN Troubleshooting on
    http://www.ChicagoTech.net
    How to Setup Windows, Network, VPN & Remote Access on
    http://www.HowToNetworking.com
    "-keevill-" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Here's my setup in my office/internet cafe.
    > I have 2 ISP's ( we need redundancy here ) each one connected via ADSL
    > modem/routers.
    > One router configured on our LAN with ip 192.168.0.250 and the other one
    > 192.168.0.1. The latter is the 'main' ISP.
    > From this router a RJ45 lan cable plugged into the LAN port feeds another
    > Wireless/Router in the Internet cafe in the lower floors.
    > From this router in turn is another lan cable which feeds a second
    > wireless router in the cafe to give full coverage.
    > Only 1 dchp server runs on the main adsl modem router ( 192.168.0.1 ).
    > Office computers have fixed IP's and cafe customers obtain dynamic IP's
    > from this router upstairs.
    > They do not connect directly to this router as they cannot quite reach it
    > wirelessly.
    > THerefore they connect to either of the ones in cafe and the IP addresses
    > are discovered via the router/dhcp server upstairs.
    > It generally works well.
    > I would like to be able to find a way to steer customers to either ISP
    > according to which one is working better.
    > I have tried to use a static route setting in each of the cafe wireless
    > routers , one configured to 'point' to ISP A and the other to point to ISP
    > B.
    > I made an entry like this.
    >
    > Index Network Address Subnet Mask Gateway
    > 1 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.0.250
    >
    > But it does not seem to work. If I do a tracert I can see that the
    > connected pc connects to the internet via the other ISP on the 192.168.0.1
    > IP.
    > Of course I can force it by just giving a fixed IP and gateway on the
    > customers machines but I prefer to tell customers to connect to a
    > particular access point which would automatically route them to the
    > Internet on the approp ISP>
    > Is a static route entry the right way to go about this ? I just guessed
    > it.
    >
    > Hope this is clear.
    >
     
    Robert L. \(MS-MVP\), Apr 19, 2008
    #2
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  3. -keevill-

    -keevill- Guest

    "Robert L. (MS-MVP)" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I would use Dual WAN router. That doesn't only give you redundancy but also
    >increase the speed. Check this link for more details.
    >
    > What's Dual WAN or Load Balance RouterA Dual WAN router or called Load
    > Balance Router allows a router to use multiple paths to a destination when
    > forwarding packets. With the ability to connect ...
    > www.howtonetworking.com/whatis/dualwanrouter1.htm
    >
    >
    > --
    > Bob Lin, MS-MVP, MCSE & CNE
    > Networking, Internet, Routing, VPN Troubleshooting on
    > http://www.ChicagoTech.net
    > How to Setup Windows, Network, VPN & Remote Access on
    > http://www.HowToNetworking.com


    So I can't do it using settings on the routers ??
    -keevill-
     
    -keevill-, Apr 20, 2008
    #3
  4. -keevill-

    smlunatick Guest

    It is completely complex to use two router so it is easier / faster to manage
    to do this with a single router with the Dual WAN option. Windows XP likes to
    use one gateway and you do not seem to have a single central point that you
    network is using. This could be done with adding a central access server.

    On 19/04/2008 "-keevill-" <> wrote:
    >
    >"Robert L. (MS-MVP)" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>I would use Dual WAN router. That doesn't only give you redundancy but also
    >>increase the speed. Check this link for more details.
    >>
    >> What's Dual WAN or Load Balance RouterA Dual WAN router or called Load
    >> Balance Router allows a router to use multiple paths to a destination when
    >> forwarding packets. With the ability to connect ...
    >> www.howtonetworking.com/whatis/dualwanrouter1.htm
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Bob Lin, MS-MVP, MCSE & CNE
    >> Networking, Internet, Routing, VPN Troubleshooting on
    >> http://www.ChicagoTech.net
    >> How to Setup Windows, Network, VPN & Remote Access on
    >> http://www.HowToNetworking.com

    >
    >So I can't do it using settings on the routers ??
    >-keevill-
    >
    >
     
    smlunatick, Apr 21, 2008
    #4
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