startup works intermittently

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Tristan J Krumpacker III, Nov 19, 2005.

  1. A friend is trying to rebuild a HP Vectra, with an Intel P3, 866 MHz chip.
    Some of the time it starts up ok and goes into Windows. At other times it
    just emits a series of beeps for 30 seconds, but nothing else happens. He
    suspects there might be a stray iron filing causing the problem, or maybe
    something else physical, but he has tried vacuum cleaning (carefully) and
    shaking the box. Anyone any other ideas? Thanks in advance.
     
    Tristan J Krumpacker III, Nov 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. Tristan J Krumpacker III

    thingy Guest

    Tristan J Krumpacker III wrote:
    > A friend is trying to rebuild a HP Vectra, with an Intel P3, 866 MHz chip.
    > Some of the time it starts up ok and goes into Windows. At other times it
    > just emits a series of beeps for 30 seconds, but nothing else happens. He
    > suspects there might be a stray iron filing causing the problem, or maybe
    > something else physical, but he has tried vacuum cleaning (carefully) and
    > shaking the box. Anyone any other ideas? Thanks in advance.
    >
    >



    how many bleeps? usually that is an error code to tell you the fault.

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Nov 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. Tristan J Krumpacker III

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Tristan J Krumpacker III wrote:
    > A friend is trying to rebuild a HP Vectra, with an Intel P3, 866 MHz
    > chip. Some of the time it starts up ok and goes into Windows. At
    > other times it just emits a series of beeps for 30 seconds, but
    > nothing else happens. He suspects there might be a stray iron filing
    > causing the problem, or maybe something else physical, but he has
    > tried vacuum cleaning (carefully) and shaking the box. Anyone any
    > other ideas? Thanks in advance.


    Remove all expansion cards, including RAM, taking anti-static precautions.
    Then spray lots of CO cleaner into each of the slots and on the card/module
    contacts. (Or clean the card contacts with an eraser) re-seat the IDE/floppy
    cable and PSU connections. Then try again. If that doesn't work and you/he
    are competent enough, remove and reseat the CPU, replacing the thermal
    transfer compound and cleaning the dust from the HS and fan. (It could be a
    CPU fan problem, clogged with dust. Some PCs won't start if the fan doesn't
    start). Still no-go? Try another PSU, if you don't have one you can use and
    you're careful with the packaging you can get one from DSE and if it doesn't
    fix the problem take it back within the week for a refund.

    Or, you could find the relevant web page that tells you what the series of
    beeps actually means. It's like code, different sequences mean different
    things have failed.

    Vacuum cleaning can actually fry a PC apparently. <shrug> I've vacuumed
    cases out though, not electrical components directly, just brushed them with
    a paint brush, then vacuumed the dust out of the case.

    Good luck.
    --
    ~misfit~
     
    ~misfit~, Nov 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Tristan J Krumpacker III

    thingy Guest

    ~misfit~ wrote:
    > Tristan J Krumpacker III wrote:
    >
    >>A friend is trying to rebuild a HP Vectra, with an Intel P3, 866 MHz
    >>chip. Some of the time it starts up ok and goes into Windows. At
    >>other times it just emits a series of beeps for 30 seconds, but
    >>nothing else happens. He suspects there might be a stray iron filing
    >>causing the problem, or maybe something else physical, but he has
    >>tried vacuum cleaning (carefully) and shaking the box. Anyone any
    >>other ideas? Thanks in advance.

    >
    >
    > Remove all expansion cards, including RAM, taking anti-static precautions.
    > Then spray lots of CO cleaner into each of the slots and on the card/module
    > contacts. (Or clean the card contacts with an eraser) re-seat the IDE/floppy
    > cable and PSU connections. Then try again. If that doesn't work and you/he
    > are competent enough, remove and reseat the CPU, replacing the thermal
    > transfer compound and cleaning the dust from the HS and fan. (It could be a
    > CPU fan problem, clogged with dust. Some PCs won't start if the fan doesn't
    > start). Still no-go? Try another PSU, if you don't have one you can use and
    > you're careful with the packaging you can get one from DSE and if it doesn't
    > fix the problem take it back within the week for a refund.
    >
    > Or, you could find the relevant web page that tells you what the series of
    > beeps actually means. It's like code, different sequences mean different
    > things have failed.
    >
    > Vacuum cleaning can actually fry a PC apparently. <shrug> I've vacuumed
    > cases out though, not electrical components directly, just brushed them with
    > a paint brush, then vacuumed the dust out of the case.
    >
    > Good luck.


    There can be a lot of static in dust....though blowing it with clean
    canned gas is supposed to be OK.

    <shrug>

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Nov 19, 2005
    #4
  5. Tristan J Krumpacker III

    ~misfit~ Guest

    thingy wrote:
    > ~misfit~ wrote:
    >> Tristan J Krumpacker III wrote:
    >>
    >>> A friend is trying to rebuild a HP Vectra, with an Intel P3, 866 MHz
    >>> chip. Some of the time it starts up ok and goes into Windows. At
    >>> other times it just emits a series of beeps for 30 seconds, but
    >>> nothing else happens. He suspects there might be a stray iron filing
    >>> causing the problem, or maybe something else physical, but he has
    >>> tried vacuum cleaning (carefully) and shaking the box. Anyone any
    >>> other ideas? Thanks in advance.

    >>
    >>
    >> Remove all expansion cards, including RAM, taking anti-static
    >> precautions. Then spray lots of CO cleaner into each of the slots
    >> and on the card/module contacts. (Or clean the card contacts with an
    >> eraser) re-seat the IDE/floppy cable and PSU connections. Then try
    >> again. If that doesn't work and you/he are competent enough, remove
    >> and reseat the CPU, replacing the thermal transfer compound and
    >> cleaning the dust from the HS and fan. (It could be a CPU fan
    >> problem, clogged with dust. Some PCs won't start if the fan doesn't
    >> start). Still no-go? Try another PSU, if you don't have one you can
    >> use and you're careful with the packaging you can get one from DSE
    >> and if it doesn't fix the problem take it back within the week for a
    >> refund. Or, you could find the relevant web page that tells you what the
    >> series of beeps actually means. It's like code, different sequences
    >> mean different things have failed.
    >>
    >> Vacuum cleaning can actually fry a PC apparently. <shrug> I've
    >> vacuumed cases out though, not electrical components directly, just
    >> brushed them with a paint brush, then vacuumed the dust out of the
    >> case. Good luck.

    >
    > There can be a lot of static in dust....though blowing it with clean
    > canned gas is supposed to be OK.
    >
    > <shrug>


    Yeah, like I can afford canned air. :) That CO cleaner is bad enough, $20+
    for a can. (and mine's nearly empty) Like I said, I clean the components
    with a (dry) paintbrush (natural fibre, not synthetic) then, have been known
    to vacuum out the bottom of the tower case. Ideally I hear you shouldn't put
    a vacuum cleaner anywhere near a PC.
    --
    ~misfit~
     
    ~misfit~, Nov 19, 2005
    #5
  6. Tristan J Krumpacker III

    Rob Guest


    >
    >
    > Yeah, like I can afford canned air. :) That CO cleaner is bad enough, $20+
    > for a can. (and mine's nearly empty) Like I said, I clean the components
    > with a (dry) paintbrush (natural fibre, not synthetic) then, have been known
    > to vacuum out the bottom of the tower case. Ideally I hear you shouldn't put
    > a vacuum cleaner anywhere near a PC.


    Keep the vacuum cleaner nozzle well away from the electronics, the
    plastic builds up a static charge from the air rushing by. There are
    specialist cleaners with earthed nozzles to counter this (not cheap). I
    usually do what you do, brush the dust off and vacuum out the bottom of
    the case keeping the nozzle in contact with the case.
     
    Rob, Nov 19, 2005
    #6
  7. Tristan J Krumpacker III

    David Guest

    Rob wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Yeah, like I can afford canned air. :) That CO cleaner is bad enough,
    >> $20+ for a can. (and mine's nearly empty) Like I said, I clean the
    >> components with a (dry) paintbrush (natural fibre, not synthetic)
    >> then, have been known to vacuum out the bottom of the tower case.
    >> Ideally I hear you shouldn't put a vacuum cleaner anywhere near a PC.

    >
    >
    > Keep the vacuum cleaner nozzle well away from the electronics, the
    > plastic builds up a static charge from the air rushing by. There are
    > specialist cleaners with earthed nozzles to counter this (not cheap). I
    > usually do what you do, brush the dust off and vacuum out the bottom of
    > the case keeping the nozzle in contact with the case.


    meh, i recently vacuumed mine, making the fans spin rediculously fast
    backwards was especially fun. Its never run better. Maybe i was just
    lucky. (Reinstalling windows helped too).
     
    David, Nov 19, 2005
    #7
  8. Tristan J Krumpacker III

    Joy Guest

    "Tristan J Krumpacker III" <> wrote in message
    news:pHxff.2280$...
    >A friend is trying to rebuild a HP Vectra, with an Intel P3, 866 MHz chip.
    > Some of the time it starts up ok and goes into Windows. At other times it
    > just emits a series of beeps for 30 seconds, but nothing else happens. He
    > suspects there might be a stray iron filing causing the problem, or maybe
    > something else physical, but he has tried vacuum cleaning (carefully) and
    > shaking the box. Anyone any other ideas? Thanks in advance.


    My son just put a new CPU fan in and it beeped on startup. It wasn't seated
    properly and the CPU was getting too hot.
    Joy
     
    Joy, Nov 19, 2005
    #8
  9. Tristan J Krumpacker III

    ~misfit~ Guest

    David wrote:
    > Rob wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Yeah, like I can afford canned air. :) That CO cleaner is bad
    >>> enough, $20+ for a can. (and mine's nearly empty) Like I said, I
    >>> clean the components with a (dry) paintbrush (natural fibre, not
    >>> synthetic) then, have been known to vacuum out the bottom of the
    >>> tower case. Ideally I hear you shouldn't put a vacuum cleaner
    >>> anywhere near a PC.

    >>
    >>
    >> Keep the vacuum cleaner nozzle well away from the electronics, the
    >> plastic builds up a static charge from the air rushing by. There are
    >> specialist cleaners with earthed nozzles to counter this (not
    >> cheap). I usually do what you do, brush the dust off and vacuum out
    >> the bottom of the case keeping the nozzle in contact with the case.

    >
    > meh, i recently vacuumed mine, making the fans spin rediculously fast
    > backwards was especially fun. Its never run better. Maybe i was just
    > lucky. (Reinstalling windows helped too).


    LOL, I've done some things in ways that were certainly not 'by the book'
    too. However, I wouldn't go around suggesting others do the same thing. :)
    --
    ~misfit~
     
    ~misfit~, Nov 19, 2005
    #9
  10. Tristan J Krumpacker III

    steve Guest

    Tristan J Krumpacker III wrote:

    > A friend is trying to rebuild a HP Vectra, with an Intel P3, 866 MHz chip.
    > Some of the time it starts up ok and goes into Windows. At other times it
    > just emits a series of beeps for 30 seconds, but nothing else happens. He
    > suspects there might be a stray iron filing causing the problem, or maybe
    > something else physical, but he has tried vacuum cleaning (carefully) and
    > shaking the box. Anyone any other ideas? Thanks in advance.


    I've got some old hardware that behaves this way.....so I don't turn the
    buggers off.

    Once they are warmed up, they start easily enough and run for weeks (until
    the power fails for some reason).
     
    steve, Nov 20, 2005
    #10
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