Stallman Crashes Patent Session

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 22, 2010.

  1. Richard Stallman holds up protest placards at a presentation on patents at
    the World Computing Congress in Australia
    <http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/news/stallman-crashes-computing-conference-patent-session>.

    I may not always agree with him, but this is one of those cases where he
    shows how important he is. :)
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 22, 2010
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    peterwn Guest

    On Sep 22, 1:38 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    > Richard Stallman holds up protest placards at a presentation on patents at
    > the World Computing Congress in Australia
    > <http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/news/stallman-crashes-computing-c...>.
    >
    > I may not always agree with him, but this is one of those cases where he
    > shows how important he is. :)


    Which begs the question as to why a EU bureaucrat is advocating
    software patents when the European Parliament has made its opposition
    known on the matter.
     
    peterwn, Sep 22, 2010
    #2
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  3. In message
    <>, peterwn
    wrote:

    > Which begs the question as to why a EU bureaucrat is advocating
    > software patents when the European Parliament has made its opposition
    > known on the matter.


    The EC and the European Parliament have been tussling over this for a long
    time, with EC continually trying to reinterpret the Parliament’s directions
    in more software-patent-friendly ways.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 22, 2010
    #3
  4. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    peterwn Guest

    On Sep 22, 3:21 pm, Allistar <> wrote:

    >
    > It may "raise" the question, but it doesn't "beg" it.
    >
    > While I admire Stallman's tenacity on wanting software to be "free", I
    > consider it *much* more important for people to be free first.

    Yes, free from Patent tyrany.
     
    peterwn, Sep 22, 2010
    #4
  5. In message <>, Allistar wrote:

    > peterwn wrote:
    >
    >> On Sep 22, 3:21 pm, Allistar <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> It may "raise" the question, but it doesn't "beg" it.
    >>>
    >>> While I admire Stallman's tenacity on wanting software to be "free", I
    >>> consider it *much* more important for people to be free first.

    >> Yes, free from Patent tyrany.

    >
    > Free from ALL tyranny.


    Not really Stallman’s shtick.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 22, 2010
    #5
  6. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Gib Bogle Guest

    Allistar wrote:
    > peterwn wrote:
    >
    >> On Sep 22, 3:21 pm, Allistar <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> It may "raise" the question, but it doesn't "beg" it.
    >>>
    >>> While I admire Stallman's tenacity on wanting software to be "free", I
    >>> consider it *much* more important for people to be free first.

    >> Yes, free from Patent tyrany.

    >
    > Free from ALL tyranny.


    Even mothers-in-law??
     
    Gib Bogle, Sep 22, 2010
    #6
  7. In message <i7c2m9$oh6$>, Gib Bogle wrote:

    > Allistar wrote:
    >>
    >> Free from ALL tyranny.

    >
    > Even mothers-in-law??


    He said “tyrannyâ€, not “Tyrannosaurus Rexâ€.




























    :)
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 22, 2010
    #7
  8. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 19:25:31 -0700, peterwn wrote:

    > On Sep 22, 1:38 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    > central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    >> Richard Stallman holds up protest placards at a presentation on patents
    >> at the World Computing Congress in Australia
    >> <http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/news/stallman-crashes-computing-

    c...>.
    >>
    >> I may not always agree with him, but this is one of those cases where
    >> he shows how important he is. :)

    >
    > Which begs the question as to why a EU bureaucrat is advocating software
    > patents when the European Parliament has made its opposition known on
    > the matter.


    Because that EU civil servant is in Microsoft's pocket?


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Sweetpea, Sep 22, 2010
    #8
  9. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 07:36:16 +1200, whoisthis wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Sweetpea <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 19:25:31 -0700, peterwn wrote:
    >>
    >> > On Sep 22, 1:38 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    >> > central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    >> >> Richard Stallman holds up protest placards at a presentation on
    >> >> patents at the World Computing Congress in Australia
    >> >> <http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/news/stallman-crashes-

    computing-
    >> c...>.
    >> >>
    >> >> I may not always agree with him, but this is one of those cases
    >> >> where he shows how important he is. :)
    >> >
    >> > Which begs the question as to why a EU bureaucrat is advocating
    >> > software patents when the European Parliament has made its opposition
    >> > known on the matter.

    >>
    >> Because that EU civil servant is in Microsoft's pocket?

    >
    > OR, because people are entitled to their opinions and beliefs and are
    > allowed to express them.


    A civil servant is not entitled to their own opinion when performing
    their job - they must comply with the law, regulations, and any
    ministerial directives that have been issued.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Sweetpea, Sep 23, 2010
    #9
  10. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 21:24:00 +1200, whoisthis wrote:

    >> A civil servant is not entitled to their own opinion when performing
    >> their job - they must comply with the law, regulations, and any
    >> ministerial directives that have been issued.

    >
    > Incorrect, civil servants who are looking at policy etc etc have their
    > opinions all of the time.


    A civil servant who is a policy analyst is unique in the Civil Service.
    The majority - the vast majority - are not employed to have an opinion.
    They are employed to administer the law, regulations, and any ministerial
    directives that have been issued.



    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Sweetpea, Sep 24, 2010
    #10
  11. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Sat, 25 Sep 2010 07:34:17 +1200, whoisthis wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Sweetpea <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 21:24:00 +1200, whoisthis wrote:
    >>
    >> >> A civil servant is not entitled to their own opinion when performing
    >> >> their job - they must comply with the law, regulations, and any
    >> >> ministerial directives that have been issued.
    >> >
    >> > Incorrect, civil servants who are looking at policy etc etc have
    >> > their opinions all of the time.

    >>
    >> A civil servant who is a policy analyst is unique in the Civil Service.
    >> The majority - the vast majority - are not employed to have an opinion.
    >> They are employed to administer the law, regulations, and any
    >> ministerial directives that have been issued.

    >
    > that applies to ALL employees, not just civil servants.


    A cleaner in a private company is not paid to administer the law, nor
    government regulations, nor ministerial directives.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Sweetpea, Sep 25, 2010
    #11
  12. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Sat, 25 Sep 2010 11:52:38 +1200, whoisthis wrote:

    >> >> >> A civil servant is not entitled to their own opinion when
    >> >> >> performing their job - they must comply with the law,
    >> >> >> regulations, and any ministerial directives that have been
    >> >> >> issued.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Incorrect, civil servants who are looking at policy etc etc have
    >> >> > their opinions all of the time.
    >> >>
    >> >> A civil servant who is a policy analyst is unique in the Civil
    >> >> Service. The majority - the vast majority - are not employed to have
    >> >> an opinion. They are employed to administer the law, regulations,
    >> >> and any ministerial directives that have been issued.
    >> >
    >> > that applies to ALL employees, not just civil servants.

    >>
    >> A cleaner in a private company is not paid to administer the law, nor
    >> government regulations, nor ministerial directives.

    >
    > Irrelevant,


    Disagree.


    > everyone has opinions, even you.


    Agreed.

    The fact that people have opinions is irrelevant. If you are a civil
    servant you are obliged to administer the law, the government
    regulations, and any ministerial directives. Any opinion you may have
    does not change what the law, government regulations, and the ministerial
    directives require you to do.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Sweetpea, Sep 25, 2010
    #12
  13. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    On 29/09/2010 9:20 a.m., Allistar wrote:
    > impossible wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> "Allistar"<> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> impossible wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Allistar"<> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> impossible wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Allistar"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>> impossible wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> "Allistar"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>>> impossible wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> "Allistar"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>>>>> peterwn wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>> On Sep 22, 3:21 pm, Allistar<> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> It may "raise" the question, but it doesn't "beg" it.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> While I admire Stallman's tenacity on wanting software to be
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> "free", I consider it *much* more important for people to be
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> free
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> first.
    >>>>>>>>>>>> Yes, free from Patent tyrany.
    >>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> Free from ALL tyranny.
    >>>>>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> Tyranny is a completely subjective term that refers to any
    >>>>>>>>>> exercise of
    >>>>>>>>>> power deemed to be arbitrary, abusive, and unrestrained. In that
    >>>>>>>>>> sense,
    >>>>>>>>>> communists, Islamo-fascists, anti-tax crusaders, and petty
    >>>>>>>>>> ideologues of
    >>>>>>>>>> all sorts oppose something called "tyranny". Which are you?
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> None of them.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Why is being anti-tax considered tyranny?
    >>>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Because anti-tax crusaders tyrannize the rest of us with threats to
    >>>>>>>> disable every function of government that doesn't involve either
    >>>>>>>> clubbing someone at close range or blowing them up from afar.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Perhaps if you equate "anti-tax" with "anarchism". I do not. Having
    >>>>>>> no taxation (or seriously reduced taxation) doesn't imply there would
    >>>>>>> be no government. It just implies that the government would be funded
    >>>>>>> differently.
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Exactly what functions of government do you intend to fund without
    >>>>>> taxation?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Me personally? I would gladly help fund those services which exist to
    >>>>> protect us from the initiation of force. So a justice system, armed
    >>>>> forces and police.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I would (and currently do) fund other non government organisations that
    >>>>> provide assistance for people that I consider to be important. Plunket,
    >>>>> surf
    >>>>> rescue etc.
    >>>
    >>>> I repeat: Exactly what functions of government do you intend to fund
    >>>> without taxation?
    >>>
    >>> I repeat: I would gladly help fund those services which exist to protect
    >>> us
    >>> from the initiation of force. So a justice system, armed forces and
    >>> police.
    >>> --

    >>
    >> The question is about taxation, Allistar, not your personal charity
    >> donations. Do you, or do you not support taxation to fund the police and
    >> armed forces?

    >
    > No I do not. Taxation is the initiation of force. As such it is morally and
    > ethically reprehensible. An enlightened society doesn't harm people in order
    > to help them. That's hypocrisy.


    By your reasoning every debt is an initiation of force.
    You speak rubbish.
     
    victor, Sep 29, 2010
    #13
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