Sprint - MPLS & VPN

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Phil Schuman, Aug 8, 2006.

  1. Phil Schuman

    Phil Schuman Guest

    hi -
    Just catching up since we rolled out Frame Relay several years ago.
    With something like Sprint's MPLS offering,
    what is required in the router to connect and support a MPLS network.
    I can see how the firmware must be upgraded
    to understand the new tags used by MPLS.
    But why does it seem that MPLS and VPN are mentioned together,
    and yet we didn't need a VPN when using our Frame network.

    Any other considerations for migrating from a Frame network
    up to a MPLS network ?

    Also - I didn't see a MPLS newsgroup, but there was an old Frame group.
    Phil Schuman, Aug 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. Phil Schuman

    stephen Guest

    "Phil Schuman" <> wrote in message
    news:ne8Cg.5596$...
    > hi -
    > Just catching up since we rolled out Frame Relay several years ago.
    > With something like Sprint's MPLS offering,
    > what is required in the router to connect and support a MPLS network.
    > I can see how the firmware must be upgraded
    > to understand the new tags used by MPLS.


    The MPLS tags dont normally get to your routers - they are within the
    carrier cloud, and are there to let the telco use a common backbone for lots
    of different customers.

    A lot of MPLS services support more modern types of QoS etc - but there is
    no real reason you need up to the minute code versions. MPLS has been around
    for several years now, so obviously worked with IOS releases current when it
    1st came out.

    > But why does it seem that MPLS and VPN are mentioned together,


    I dont know what Sprint do specifically, but it is common practice for some
    carriers to use Frame Relay encap between PE and CE router - ie on the link
    from customer site to the carrier cloud.

    So - in theory Sprint could swap you from F/R to MPLS, and all you need is
    some changes to the config on the routers.

    We use it at work because you can use multiple PVCs to carry different VRFs
    to give multiple logical VPNs on 1 access link.

    > and yet we didn't need a VPN when using our Frame network.


    A specific customer F/Relay set of PVCs and ports sort of make up a layer 2
    cloud. They didnt call it a VPN as that wasnt the "in vogue" term at the
    time :).
    >
    > Any other considerations for migrating from a Frame network
    > up to a MPLS network ?
    >

    One advantage of MPLS is alternate access link support - Ethernet at
    10/100/1000 Mbps for example.

    QoS is pretty much standard (although usually with some extra costs), and
    other things such as multicast, IP voice breakout in the cloud, Internet
    feeds and hosting integration all come up frequently.

    Multiple VPNs can be useful e.g. to segregate a live and test network, or
    internal net and an extranet, but without needing separate access lines.

    I suggest you start writing down requirements without worrying about MPLS
    capabilities and then check how closely the carrier services map to that.

    > Also - I didn't see a MPLS newsgroup, but there was an old Frame group.
    >

    --
    Regards

    - replace xyz with ntl
    stephen, Aug 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. Phil Schuman

    Phil Schuman Guest

    tnx for the update -
    MPLS tags -> was using that as a generic term for the Frame PVC/LMI
    concept.
    and VPN now is just a PVC with encryption :) for all the HIPAA, SOX, etc
    folks

    "stephen" <> wrote in message
    news:Qu8Cg.6368$...
    > "Phil Schuman" <> wrote in message
    > news:ne8Cg.5596$...
    > > hi -
    > > Just catching up since we rolled out Frame Relay several years ago.
    > > With something like Sprint's MPLS offering,
    > > what is required in the router to connect and support a MPLS

    network.
    > > I can see how the firmware must be upgraded
    > > to understand the new tags used by MPLS.

    >
    > The MPLS tags dont normally get to your routers - they are within the
    > carrier cloud, and are there to let the telco use a common backbone

    for lots
    > of different customers.
    >
    > A lot of MPLS services support more modern types of QoS etc - but

    there is
    > no real reason you need up to the minute code versions. MPLS has been

    around
    > for several years now, so obviously worked with IOS releases current

    when it
    > 1st came out.
    >
    > > But why does it seem that MPLS and VPN are mentioned together,

    >
    > I dont know what Sprint do specifically, but it is common practice for

    some
    > carriers to use Frame Relay encap between PE and CE router - ie on the

    link
    > from customer site to the carrier cloud.
    >
    > So - in theory Sprint could swap you from F/R to MPLS, and all you

    need is
    > some changes to the config on the routers.
    >
    > We use it at work because you can use multiple PVCs to carry different

    VRFs
    > to give multiple logical VPNs on 1 access link.
    >
    > > and yet we didn't need a VPN when using our Frame network.

    >
    > A specific customer F/Relay set of PVCs and ports sort of make up a

    layer 2
    > cloud. They didnt call it a VPN as that wasnt the "in vogue" term at

    the
    > time :).
    > >
    > > Any other considerations for migrating from a Frame network
    > > up to a MPLS network ?
    > >

    > One advantage of MPLS is alternate access link support - Ethernet at
    > 10/100/1000 Mbps for example.
    >
    > QoS is pretty much standard (although usually with some extra costs),

    and
    > other things such as multicast, IP voice breakout in the cloud,

    Internet
    > feeds and hosting integration all come up frequently.
    >
    > Multiple VPNs can be useful e.g. to segregate a live and test network,

    or
    > internal net and an extranet, but without needing separate access

    lines.
    >
    > I suggest you start writing down requirements without worrying about

    MPLS
    > capabilities and then check how closely the carrier services map to

    that.
    >
    > > Also - I didn't see a MPLS newsgroup, but there was an old Frame

    group.
    > >

    > --
    > Regards
    >
    > - replace xyz with ntl
    >
    >
    Phil Schuman, Aug 9, 2006
    #3
  4. Hi Phil,

    You may wish to investigate Cisco's extremely active and robust:

    MPLS Newsgroup

    http://forum.cisco.com/eforum/servl...d=display_messages&mode=new&location=.ee8558c

    Found at Cisco Systems Technical Forums:

    http://www.bradreese.com/cisco-technical-newsgroups.htm#FORUMS

    Hope this helps.

    Brad Reese
    BradReese.Com - Cisco Power Supply Headquarters
    http://www.bradreese.com/cisco-power-supply-inventory.htm
    1293 Hendersonville Road, Suite 17
    Asheville, North Carolina USA 28803
    USA & Canada: 877-549-2680
    International: 828-277-7272
    Fax: 775-254-3558
    AIM: R2MGrant
    BradReese.Com - Cisco Jobs
    http://www.bradreese.com/hot-jobs.htm
    www.BradReese.Com, Aug 9, 2006
    #4
  5. Phil Schuman

    Guest

    mpls is within the carrier cloud is correct;
    one advantage of this type of typology is the
    any to any connectivity, vs a hub and spoke type of typology.
    this allows better use of a network to roll out
    services such as voip.

    Paul

    stephen wrote:
    > "Phil Schuman" <> wrote in message
    > news:ne8Cg.5596$...
    >
    >>hi -
    >>Just catching up since we rolled out Frame Relay several years ago.
    >>With something like Sprint's MPLS offering,
    >>what is required in the router to connect and support a MPLS network.
    >>I can see how the firmware must be upgraded
    >>to understand the new tags used by MPLS.

    >
    >
    > The MPLS tags dont normally get to your routers - they are within the
    > carrier cloud, and are there to let the telco use a common backbone for lots
    > of different customers.
    >
    > A lot of MPLS services support more modern types of QoS etc - but there is
    > no real reason you need up to the minute code versions. MPLS has been around
    > for several years now, so obviously worked with IOS releases current when it
    > 1st came out.
    >
    >
    >>But why does it seem that MPLS and VPN are mentioned together,

    >
    >
    > I dont know what Sprint do specifically, but it is common practice for some
    > carriers to use Frame Relay encap between PE and CE router - ie on the link
    > from customer site to the carrier cloud.
    >
    > So - in theory Sprint could swap you from F/R to MPLS, and all you need is
    > some changes to the config on the routers.
    >
    > We use it at work because you can use multiple PVCs to carry different VRFs
    > to give multiple logical VPNs on 1 access link.
    >
    >
    >>and yet we didn't need a VPN when using our Frame network.

    >
    >
    > A specific customer F/Relay set of PVCs and ports sort of make up a layer 2
    > cloud. They didnt call it a VPN as that wasnt the "in vogue" term at the
    > time :).
    >
    >>Any other considerations for migrating from a Frame network
    >>up to a MPLS network ?
    >>

    >
    > One advantage of MPLS is alternate access link support - Ethernet at
    > 10/100/1000 Mbps for example.
    >
    > QoS is pretty much standard (although usually with some extra costs), and
    > other things such as multicast, IP voice breakout in the cloud, Internet
    > feeds and hosting integration all come up frequently.
    >
    > Multiple VPNs can be useful e.g. to segregate a live and test network, or
    > internal net and an extranet, but without needing separate access lines.
    >
    > I suggest you start writing down requirements without worrying about MPLS
    > capabilities and then check how closely the carrier services map to that.
    >
    >
    >>Also - I didn't see a MPLS newsgroup, but there was an old Frame group.
    >>
    , Aug 9, 2006
    #5
  6. Phil Schuman

    Phil Schuman Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:bsdCg.11410$rd1.2175@trnddc01...
    > mpls is within the carrier cloud is correct;
    > one advantage of this type of typology is the
    > any to any connectivity, vs a hub and spoke type of typology.
    > this allows better use of a network to roll out
    > services such as voip.
    >

    We are migrating from an existing Frame network to a MPLS network,
    along with upgrading our current 2501 and 1600 routers to 2801 -
    Phil Schuman, Aug 9, 2006
    #6
  7. www.BradReese.Com, Aug 10, 2006
    #7
  8. Phil Schuman

    Phil Schuman Guest

    Phil Schuman, Aug 10, 2006
    #8
    1. Advertising

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