Spinrite Question Concerning HD Testing

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by dt@no.net, Sep 16, 2007.

  1. Guest

    I have a Maxtor 275 Gig outboard drive.

    I went to check it for the first time with Spinrite and was told by
    Spinrite that it would take over 48 hours to check the drive with it's
    read & write check.

    Does this sound right? Or will that time estimate possibly change
    drastically downwards as Spinrite gets going more into the drive?

    How may people would lock up their comps for two days just to check a
    single drive?

    Is there another program that will do this same job and faster than
    Spinrite?

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    , Sep 16, 2007
    #1
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  2. VanguardLH Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have a Maxtor 275 Gig outboard drive.
    >
    > I went to check it for the first time with Spinrite and was told by
    > Spinrite that it would take over 48 hours to check the drive with
    > it's
    > read & write check.
    >
    > Does this sound right? Or will that time estimate possibly change
    > drastically downwards as Spinrite gets going more into the drive?
    >
    > How may people would lock up their comps for two days just to check
    > a
    > single drive?
    >
    > Is there another program that will do this same job and faster than
    > Spinrite?
    >
    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure
    > Usenet News==----
    > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
    > 120,000+ Newsgroups
    > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via
    > Encryption =----



    Was going to answer but I don't respond to spam, even if spamified
    posts.
    VanguardLH, Sep 16, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Guest

    On Sun, 16 Sep 2007 16:41:53 -0500, "VanguardLH"
    <> wrote:

    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>I have a Maxtor 275 Gig outboard drive.
    >>
    >> I went to check it for the first time with Spinrite and was told by
    >> Spinrite that it would take over 48 hours to check the drive with
    >> it's
    >> read & write check.
    >>
    >> Does this sound right? Or will that time estimate possibly change
    >> drastically downwards as Spinrite gets going more into the drive?
    >>
    >> How may people would lock up their comps for two days just to check
    >> a
    >> single drive?
    >>
    >> Is there another program that will do this same job and faster than
    >> Spinrite?
    >>
    >> ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure
    >> Usenet News==----
    >> http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
    >> 120,000+ Newsgroups
    >> ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via
    >> Encryption =----

    >
    >
    >Was going to answer but I don't respond to spam, even if spamified
    >posts.


    Would you care to explain to me what a "spamified" post is?

    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
    , Sep 16, 2007
    #3
  4. Guest

    wrote:

    >I have a Maxtor 275 Gig outboard drive.
    >
    >I went to check it for the first time with Spinrite and was told by
    >Spinrite that it would take over 48 hours to check the drive with it's
    >read & write check.
    >
    >Does this sound right? Or will that time estimate possibly change
    >drastically downwards as Spinrite gets going more into the drive?
    >
    >How may people would lock up their comps for two days just to check a
    >single drive?
    >
    >Is there another program that will do this same job and faster than
    >Spinrite?


    Sounds right if a bit fast.

    Back when 80 meg hard drives supported BBS's (Bulletin board Systems)
    Spinrite was the tool of choice to recover a bad hard drive.
    12- 24 hours were a norm.

    A 275 Gig drive could take a while. And yes the time it takes would
    depend upon you want to fix the errors as well.

    Spinrite is a very nice HD utility.
    --

    http://jimcotton.blogspot.com/2007/09/this-one-must-be-sickest-but-funniest.html
    Or http://tinyurl.com/2trkoo
    , Sep 16, 2007
    #4
  5. Guest

    On Sun, 16 Sep 2007 15:48:47 -0700, wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    >>I have a Maxtor 275 Gig outboard drive.
    >>
    >>I went to check it for the first time with Spinrite and was told by
    >>Spinrite that it would take over 48 hours to check the drive with it's
    >>read & write check.
    >>
    >>Does this sound right? Or will that time estimate possibly change
    >>drastically downwards as Spinrite gets going more into the drive?
    >>
    >>How may people would lock up their comps for two days just to check a
    >>single drive?
    >>
    >>Is there another program that will do this same job and faster than
    >>Spinrite?

    >
    >Sounds right if a bit fast.
    >
    >Back when 80 meg hard drives supported BBS's (Bulletin board Systems)
    >Spinrite was the tool of choice to recover a bad hard drive.
    >12- 24 hours were a norm.
    >
    >A 275 Gig drive could take a while. And yes the time it takes would
    >depend upon you want to fix the errors as well.
    >
    >Spinrite is a very nice HD utility.


    That's basically what I wanted to know. I guess if it is important
    enough, you do it no matter what the time span. Spinrite does have the
    feature wherein you could spread the test out over a period of days by
    marking where you have begun and ended.

    I just had a 275 Gig drive go right out from under me in no time flat.
    However, I did have all the info from it backed up to a second identical
    275 Gig external drive, so I'm not really hurting, except for the $$$ I
    now have to lay out for a new drive. :eek:(

    Thanks for answering.



    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
    , Sep 17, 2007
    #5
  6. VanguardLH Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Would you care to explain to me what a "spamified" post is?
    >
    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure
    > Usenet News==----
    > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
    > 120,000+ Newsgroups
    > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via
    > Encryption =----



    You need to remove the blinders. Go back and look are your OWN posts,
    not just the replies to them. Just what do you think all that crap is
    regarding "Posted va Newsfeeds"? You are spamming on behalf of
    Newsfeeds. Hell, they're so rude that they don't even bother putting
    it in a signature (i.e., there is no sigdash delimiter).
    VanguardLH, Sep 17, 2007
    #6
  7. Ponder Guest

    Hiya .

    In <news:> you wrote:

    > I just had a 275 Gig drive go right out from under me in no time flat.
    > However, I did have all the info from it backed up to a second identical
    > 275 Gig external drive, so I'm not really hurting, except for the $$$ I
    > now have to lay out for a new drive. :eek:(


    Isn't it under warranty?

    --
    PGP key ID - DSS:0x2661A952
    Homepage: http://www.colinjones.co.uk ICQ# 1707811
    Skittles Team: http://www.ddskittles.co.uk
    Ponder, Sep 17, 2007
    #7
  8. wrote:

    > I have a Maxtor 275 Gig outboard drive.
    >
    > I went to check it for the first time with Spinrite and was told by
    > Spinrite that it would take over 48 hours to check the drive with it's
    > read & write check.
    >

    The "check" done by spinrite is trying to find and fix weak or bad sectors,
    not comparable to a chkdsk, which would run much faster.

    > Does this sound right? Or will that time estimate possibly change
    > drastically downwards as Spinrite gets going more into the drive?
    >

    No, it scans raw sectors and proceeds continuously, predictable, but slow.

    > How may people would lock up their comps for two days just to check a
    > single drive?
    >

    When they hope for recovery .... but then, with modern drives, a already
    dying drive often doesn't survive the torture and quits completely inmidst.

    > Is there another program that will do this same job and faster than
    > Spinrite?
    >

    Since Spinrite originates some 10 years past, and harddrives have changed
    since then, I would rather suggest dd-rescue data off a bad drive if
    possible (even in pieces, to allow cooldown in between) to a new one, then
    run recovery software like ontrack easy recovery or pc inspector file
    recovery, on the new drive. Even better to have a backup copy of the image,
    for repeated attempts.

    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
    > News==---- http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
    > 120,000+ Newsgroups ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy
    > via Encryption =----


    You may contribute to prohibit usenet spam like this: at least a signature
    delimiter ("-- ", to dashes and a whitespace at the end of a single line)
    at the end of your posts, introduced automagically by your Agent, or use
    other free newsservers like motzarella.org.
    wisdomkiller & pain, Sep 17, 2007
    #8
  9. Guest

    On Mon, 17 Sep 2007 04:32:57 GMT, Ponder <>
    wrote:

    >Hiya .
    >
    >In <news:> you wrote:
    >
    >> I just had a 275 Gig drive go right out from under me in no time flat.
    >> However, I did have all the info from it backed up to a second identical
    >> 275 Gig external drive, so I'm not really hurting, except for the $$$ I
    >> now have to lay out for a new drive. :eek:(

    >
    > Isn't it under warranty?


    Don't I wish.
    , Sep 17, 2007
    #9
  10. Guest

    On Mon, 17 Sep 2007 06:43:23 +0200, wisdomkiller & pain
    <> wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    >> I have a Maxtor 275 Gig outboard drive.
    >>
    >> I went to check it for the first time with Spinrite and was told by
    >> Spinrite that it would take over 48 hours to check the drive with it's
    >> read & write check.
    >>

    >The "check" done by spinrite is trying to find and fix weak or bad sectors,
    >not comparable to a chkdsk, which would run much faster.
    >
    >> Does this sound right? Or will that time estimate possibly change
    >> drastically downwards as Spinrite gets going more into the drive?
    >>

    >No, it scans raw sectors and proceeds continuously, predictable, but slow.
    >
    >> How may people would lock up their comps for two days just to check a
    >> single drive?
    >>

    >When they hope for recovery .... but then, with modern drives, a already
    >dying drive often doesn't survive the torture and quits completely inmidst.


    Great! Darned if you do. Darned if you don't.

    >> Is there another program that will do this same job and faster than
    >> Spinrite?
    >>

    >Since Spinrite originates some 10 years past, and harddrives have changed
    >since then, I would rather suggest dd-rescue data off a bad drive if
    >possible (even in pieces, to allow cooldown in between) to a new one, then
    >run recovery software like ontrack easy recovery or pc inspector file
    >recovery, on the new drive. Even better to have a backup copy of the image,
    >for repeated attempts.
    >

    I didn't lose any data because I had it backed up to another outboard
    drive. I just thought I'd run Spinrite to check on that drive to see
    what kind of shape it is in. However, if Spinrite is considered
    'torture' to an already weakened drive, I guess the solution is to
    forget Spinrite and just make sure everyday that everything from the E:
    is backed up to the F: (It was my F: that went south.)
    >
    >You may contribute to prohibit usenet spam like this: at least a signature
    >delimiter ("-- ", to dashes and a whitespace at the end of a single line)
    >at the end of your posts, introduced automagically by your Agent, or use
    >other free newsservers like motzarella.org.


    I've had this account only for a few days. I really hadn't noticed the
    advertising. I guess that's what that other guy was referring to with
    his p.o.'d attitude.

    The two dash-space delimiter doesn't work. The outfit must have
    figured that's what people would do and found a way to keep their ad in
    the sig. However, I do have another account that does not do that sig
    bit. I'll have to start using it for posting.

    Thanks for the info about Spinrite.

    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
    , Sep 17, 2007
    #10
  11. Guest

    wrote:

    >I didn't lose any data because I had it backed up to another outboard
    >drive. I just thought I'd run Spinrite to check on that drive to see
    >what kind of shape it is in. However, if Spinrite is considered
    >'torture' to an already weakened drive, I guess the solution is to
    >forget Spinrite and just make sure everyday that everything from the E:
    >is backed up to the F: (It was my F: that went south.)


    To just check the read write of each bit is much faster, it's the data
    recovery that takes the time.

    GRC.com also suggest running Spinrite monthly(?) on the all your
    drives to monitor their condition - that's just needless wear to your
    HD and just bad advice.


    --

    http://www.rav.efbnet.com/humour/ohshit-cat.jpg
    , Sep 17, 2007
    #11
  12. Ponder Guest

    Hiya .

    In <news:> you wrote:

    >> Isn't it under warranty?

    > Don't I wish.


    What manufacturer? The more reputable have 3 year warranties (RTM),
    though that might cost more in postage than a new drive these days I'll
    grant you.

    --
    PGP key ID - DSS:0x2661A952
    Homepage: http://www.colinjones.co.uk ICQ# 1707811
    Skittles Team: http://www.ddskittles.co.uk
    Ponder, Sep 17, 2007
    #12
  13. wrote:

    > On Mon, 17 Sep 2007 06:43:23 +0200, wisdomkiller & pain
    > <> wrote:
    >

    .....
    >>> How may people would lock up their comps for two days just to check a
    >>> single drive?
    >>>

    >>When they hope for recovery .... but then, with modern drives, a already
    >>dying drive often doesn't survive the torture and quits completely
    >>inmidst.

    >
    > Great! Darned if you do. Darned if you don't.
    >

    LOL. Yes, but Spinrite at least makes pending drive failures go straight to
    the bin.
    In fact, with the read-write test, the harddrive electronics will get a
    chance to find out about bad sectors and can remap them as long as spare
    sectors are still there. That's one reason why bad sectors may disappear
    after applying spinrite.
    Another issue: spinrite works with predictable speed as long as there are no
    bad sectors. When they are discovered, the drive electronics of modern
    drives tries to re-read them almost forever, resulting in almost stalling
    progress - depending upon the drive type and make.
    For some drives, the automatic defect management may be disabled, but
    spinrite probably doesn't do that.

    > I didn't lose any data because I had it backed up to another outboard
    > drive. I just thought I'd run Spinrite to check on that drive to see
    > what kind of shape it is in. However, if Spinrite is considered
    > 'torture' to an already weakened drive, I guess the solution is to
    > forget Spinrite and just make sure everyday that everything from the E:
    > is backed up to the F: (It was my F: that went south.)


    Backing up "everything" may not be what you want - it would require a
    imaging program and lots of time for 275 GB. With the currently low
    harddrive costs, a mirroring can achieve the same thing without effort.
    Most modern mainboards have raid capable SATA controllers these days or
    allow install of a raid capable addon card.
    However, even mirroring (raid 1) doesn't substitute a backup - since you'll
    have the same malware on both mirror drives, once you are infected, not to
    talk about the occasional wipeout of important files/folders when slightly
    intoxicated ;-)
    ......
    > The two dash-space delimiter doesn't work. The outfit must have
    > figured that's what people would do and found a way to keep their ad in
    > the sig. However, I do have another account that does not do that sig
    > bit. I'll have to start using it for posting.
    >

    You may try the two dash-whitespace and one line of text below.
    In fact, your posting still will contain the newsfeeds spam sig, but at
    least newsreaders of responders automagically will snip it.
    wisdomkiller & pain, Sep 17, 2007
    #13
  14. Guest

    On Mon, 17 Sep 2007 18:48:26 GMT, Ponder <>
    wrote:

    >Hiya .
    >
    >In <news:> you wrote:
    >
    >>> Isn't it under warranty?

    >> Don't I wish.

    >
    > What manufacturer? The more reputable have 3 year warranties (RTM),
    >though that might cost more in postage than a new drive these days I'll
    >grant you.


    It was a Maxtor with a one year guarantee. I bought it about 3 years
    ago. At that time they had only a one year guarantee. Today I bought a
    Seagate 250 Gig external drive with a 5 year guarantee. Guarantees have
    changed drastically since I made my purchase three years ago. From now
    on, I buy the drives with the longest warranty.

    To top it off, three years ago I paid about $250 for the Maxtor 275 Gig.
    Today. I paid $99 bucks for the Seagate 250 Gig. I'll see what it's
    worth. I'm thinking of getting another one to have three external
    drives. That's how paranoid one gets when at one time one had his C:
    drive go on a Saturday, and his D: drive, his backup drive, go on
    Sunday, the next day. I lost years of info. That's why I now have two
    external backup drives.
    , Sep 18, 2007
    #14
  15. Guest

    On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 00:25:04 +0200, wisdomkiller & pain
    <> wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 17 Sep 2007 06:43:23 +0200, wisdomkiller & pain
    >> <> wrote:
    >>

    >....
    >>>> How may people would lock up their comps for two days just to check a
    >>>> single drive?
    >>>>
    >>>When they hope for recovery .... but then, with modern drives, a already
    >>>dying drive often doesn't survive the torture and quits completely
    >>>inmidst.

    >>
    >> Great! Darned if you do. Darned if you don't.
    >>

    >LOL. Yes, but Spinrite at least makes pending drive failures go straight to
    >the bin.
    >In fact, with the read-write test, the harddrive electronics will get a
    >chance to find out about bad sectors and can remap them as long as spare
    >sectors are still there. That's one reason why bad sectors may disappear
    >after applying spinrite.
    >Another issue: spinrite works with predictable speed as long as there are no
    >bad sectors. When they are discovered, the drive electronics of modern
    >drives tries to re-read them almost forever, resulting in almost stalling
    >progress - depending upon the drive type and make.
    >For some drives, the automatic defect management may be disabled, but
    >spinrite probably doesn't do that.
    >
    >> I didn't lose any data because I had it backed up to another outboard
    >> drive. I just thought I'd run Spinrite to check on that drive to see
    >> what kind of shape it is in. However, if Spinrite is considered
    >> 'torture' to an already weakened drive, I guess the solution is to
    >> forget Spinrite and just make sure everyday that everything from the E:
    >> is backed up to the F: (It was my F: that went south.)

    >
    >Backing up "everything" may not be what you want - it would require a
    >imaging program and lots of time for 275 GB. With the currently low
    >harddrive costs, a mirroring can achieve the same thing without effort.
    >Most modern mainboards have raid capable SATA controllers these days or
    >allow install of a raid capable addon card.
    >However, even mirroring (raid 1) doesn't substitute a backup - since you'll
    >have the same malware on both mirror drives, once you are infected, not to
    >talk about the occasional wipeout of important files/folders when slightly
    >intoxicated ;-)
    >.....
    >> The two dash-space delimiter doesn't work. The outfit must have
    >> figured that's what people would do and found a way to keep their ad in
    >> the sig. However, I do have another account that does not do that sig
    >> bit. I'll have to start using it for posting.
    >>

    >You may try the two dash-whitespace and one line of text below.
    >In fact, your posting still will contain the newsfeeds spam sig, but at
    >least newsreaders of responders automagically will snip it.



    Right.

    Well, this whole subject is much too complicated for a simpleton who
    likes dealing with simple black and white. I think my double backup
    external drives are the way I'll stick with. The only way I can lose
    is to lose both at once.

    The prices of drives today has eased my mind quite a bit. I picked up
    a 250 Gig Seagate today for $99, and it has a 5 year warranty. As
    long as my backups are current, who cares if drives go at today's
    prices and warranty length? Junk 'em and buy a new one the next day.
    Heck, at these prices, I'm thinking of hooking up another drive as a
    backup for my backup. :eek:)

    As for the OS on my C: drive, I use Acronis True Image. It has saved
    my butt a number of times after having installed some junkware or
    other on the C: drive. Even if I somehow lost my C: plus my True Image
    Secure Zone backup, I'd still have my info on the two outboard drives.
    An OS can be zapped back on a machine, but info once lost, is GONE,

    I also have True Image mirrors on my two outboard drives. Give me
    enuf drives and gawd know what new and wonderous problems I could
    create for myself. :eek:)

    Heck, Spinrite now cost the same as a new 250 Gig drive. Gibson may
    have a bit of a problem earning a living anymore. :eek:)
    , Sep 18, 2007
    #15
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