Spherical Photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jan Nademlejnsky, Nov 14, 2006.

  1. Does anybody know how this spherical photography is done and what kind of
    equipment do you need to do it? From those amazing pictures I could say that
    it cannot be done by stitching, because there are moving objects in the
    pictures which would be impossible to stitch together. It looks to me like
    the picture is taken as a one shot through spherical mirror (one-way) or
    something like this.
    http://www.sphericalphoto.com/flash.html

    I would appreciate any links to learn more.
    Thanks
    Jan




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    Jan Nademlejnsky, Nov 14, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jan Nademlejnsky wrote:
    > Does anybody know how this spherical photography is done and what kind of
    > equipment do you need to do it? From those amazing pictures I could say that
    > it cannot be done by stitching, because there are moving objects in the
    > pictures which would be impossible to stitch together. It looks to me like
    > the picture is taken as a one shot through spherical mirror (one-way) or
    > something like this.
    > http://www.sphericalphoto.com/flash.html
    >
    > I would appreciate any links to learn more.
    > Thanks
    > Jan


    Do you mean the result shows a full sphere field of view? How is it
    displayed?

    It is possible to create a torodal field of view lens that gives 360
    field of view, but these lenses do not show directly above nor
    directly below. The image is printed in a long strip as in a
    super-panorama.
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Nov 14, 2006
    #2
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  3. Hi Jan,

    This looks like it is made with the Panorama stitching tool called
    PTGui. See this image from their website.

    http://www.ptgui.com/gallery/natexpo_2005_panorama.html?sw=1

    Bye for now.

    On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 02:00:54 GMT, "Jan Nademlejnsky" <>
    wrote:

    >Does anybody know how this spherical photography is done and what kind of
    >equipment do you need to do it? From those amazing pictures I could say that
    >it cannot be done by stitching, because there are moving objects in the
    >pictures which would be impossible to stitch together. It looks to me like
    >the picture is taken as a one shot through spherical mirror (one-way) or
    >something like this.
    >http://www.sphericalphoto.com/flash.html
    >
    >I would appreciate any links to learn more.
    >Thanks
    >Jan
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
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    >
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    >I am using the free version of SPAMfighter for private users.
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    Bye for now,

    George Dingwall

    Invergordon, Scotland

    http://www.georgedingwall.co.uk
    George Dingwall, Nov 14, 2006
    #3
  4. Jan Nademlejnsky

    Ken Lucke Guest

    Don Stauffer in Minnesota <> wrote:

    > Does anybody know how this spherical photography is done and what kind of
    > equipment do you need to do it? From those amazing pictures I could say that
    > it cannot be done by stitching, because there are moving objects in the
    > pictures which would be impossible to stitch together. It looks to me like
    > the picture is taken as a one shot through spherical mirror (one-way) or
    > something like this.
    > http://www.sphericalphoto.com/flash.html
    >
    > I would appreciate any links to learn more.
    > Thanks
    > Jan


    If you inspect all the images on that page, you'll see that all of them
    could easily be done using a 360° panorama lens or a set of panorama
    cameras with synchronized shutters pointing in several directions at
    once (or indeed with a number of normal cameras with very wide angle
    lenses linked in the same way), with the addition of a shot or two
    straight up with a normal or fisheye or turning the 360° lens 90° on
    its side.

    Not all the images there even _have_ the overhead component, so it
    becomes even more probable that that is how they are made - even the
    ones _with_ an overhead portion, that overhead portion is clearly a
    static one (ceiling, cloudy sky, etc.), with nothing moving rapidly
    enough to not be successfully computer adjusted and stitched into a
    360° panorama.

    Not too long ago I watched a guy use a homemade rig he had made just to
    do that - it was a sheet of 1/2" plywood, on which he had mounted 4
    quick release plates for 4 cameras pointing at 0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°
    with respect to dead center. He had what he called a "triple tripod"
    (3 tripods at the same time) to support the plywood and level it
    perfectly, using two of those electronic levels that Home Depot sells
    which were mounted on the underside of the plywoood - the beeping from
    which was highly annoying in the up-till-then peaceful location until
    he finally got it leveled to his satisfaction and turned them off (and
    I still have no idea why he mounted them instead of just using one,
    settting it in various locations and directions until he was
    satisfied). He had rigged up 4 cable remotes to 4 identical (3 rented)
    cameras and to an electronic switch unit that looked like it came out
    of a garage door opener, so that they would all fire simultaneously.
    He locked off all the cameras to the same settings, stepped behind a
    large tree, and pressed his [I suppose] garage door remote.

    Some people will stop at nothing to attempt be creative. Rube Goldberg
    would have been proud. Never did see the image(s), though, so I can't
    tell to what extent he was successful. Theoretically, it should have
    worked fine, as long as he or his stitching program was good enough to
    compensate for the perspective extremes at the edges of the wide angle
    shots.

    Mind you, this was all to photograph a landscape scene - no moving
    components. I have absolutely no idea why he didn't just use one
    camera on a tripod and pan it. I never had the nerve to ask him such a
    silly question (maybe because my jaw was hanging open the entire time,
    and I was trying not to giggle - giggling tends to ruin your image in a
    situation like that). Perhaps he was doing proof-of-concept for an
    actual action scene, but why he had to do it way out in the
    pucker-brush, I don't know.

    Likely those pictures you saw were the result of either something
    similar but much higher tech, or a true 360° lens.
    Ken Lucke, Nov 14, 2006
    #4
  5. "Jan Nademlejnsky" <> wrote in message news:qr96h.305462$1T2.144652@pd7urf2no...
    > Does anybody know how this spherical photography is done and what kind of equipment do you need to do it? From those amazing
    > pictures I could say that it cannot be done by stitching, because there are moving objects in the pictures which would be
    > impossible to stitch together. It looks to me like the picture is taken as a one shot through spherical mirror (one-way) or
    > something like this.
    > http://www.sphericalphoto.com/flash.html
    >
    > I would appreciate any links to learn more.
    > Thanks
    > Jan


    This looks like the result of a camera using two Nikkor 6.2mm f5.6
    lenses on cameras mounted back to back - the final image is derived
    in software (as I recall...)
    --
    David Ruether


    http://www.ferrario.com/ruether
    David Ruether, Nov 14, 2006
    #5
  6. Thanks to everyone to his info.
    Jan

    "Jan Nademlejnsky" <> wrote in message
    news:qr96h.305462$1T2.144652@pd7urf2no...
    > Does anybody know how this spherical photography is done and what kind of
    > equipment do you need to do it? From those amazing pictures I could say
    > that it cannot be done by stitching, because there are moving objects in
    > the pictures which would be impossible to stitch together. It looks to me
    > like the picture is taken as a one shot through spherical mirror (one-way)
    > or something like this.
    > http://www.sphericalphoto.com/flash.html
    >
    > I would appreciate any links to learn more.
    > Thanks
    > Jan
    >
    >
    >
    >
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    >


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    Jan Nademlejnsky, Nov 15, 2006
    #6
  7. Jan Nademlejnsky

    Eric Miller Guest

    Jan Nademlejnsky wrote:
    > Does anybody know how this spherical photography is done and what kind of
    > equipment do you need to do it? From those amazing pictures I could say that
    > it cannot be done by stitching, because there are moving objects in the
    > pictures which would be impossible to stitch together. It looks to me like
    > the picture is taken as a one shot through spherical mirror (one-way) or
    > something like this.
    > http://www.sphericalphoto.com/flash.html
    >
    > I would appreciate any links to learn more.
    > Thanks
    > Jan
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Paying users do not have this message in their emails.
    > Try SPAMfighter for free now!
    >
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > I am using the free version of SPAMfighter for private users.
    > It has removed 74 spam emails to date.
    > Paying users do not have this message in their emails.
    > Try SPAMfighter for free now!
    >
    >



    Stitched. It doesn't matter if things are moving when you take the photo
    if you plan it well.

    Eric Miller
    Eric Miller, Nov 17, 2006
    #7
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