Speedlite

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mike, Jan 11, 2005.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    When and why did a "flash" become a "speedlite"?

    Or is there a difference?
     
    Mike, Jan 11, 2005
    #1
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  2. Mike

    Ben Thomas Guest

    Mike wrote:
    > When and why did a "flash" become a "speedlite"?
    >
    > Or is there a difference?
    >
    >


    Marketing?

    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia

    My Digital World:
    Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
    Sony Ericsson K700i, Palm Tungsten T.

    Disclaimer:
    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as neither
    given nor endorsed by it.
     
    Ben Thomas, Jan 11, 2005
    #2
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  3. Mike

    Mike Guest

    "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    news:2kc1sc.el.ln@192.168.11.2...
    > Mike wrote:
    >> When and why did a "flash" become a "speedlite"?
    >>
    >> Or is there a difference?

    >
    > Marketing?
    >
    > --
    > --
    > Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia
    >
    > My Digital World:
    > Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    > Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    > Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
    > Sony Ericsson K700i, Palm Tungsten T.
    >
    > Disclaimer:
    > Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    > relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as
    > neither
    > given nor endorsed by it.


    If you suggest it Ben, far be it from me to disagree.
    Ironic though with the trend toward shortening words and phrases...i.e.
    LCD, EVF, CF, DVD, etc, "Speedlite" replaces a much easier to say, type,
    and comprehend --- "Flash".

    Maybe that's why I'm not a bean counter. No offense to any bean counters
    out there.

    Mike
     
    Mike, Jan 11, 2005
    #3

  4. > Marketing?


    Yes, as I recall it originally referred to the flash's ability to quickly
    recharge.
     
    Charles Schuler, Jan 11, 2005
    #4
  5. Mike

    C J Campbell Guest

    "Mike" <> wrote in message news:kJXEd.62$...
    >
    >
    > Maybe that's why I'm not a bean counter. No offense to any bean counters
    > out there.


    None taken. I suspect they could not trademark "flash."
     
    C J Campbell, Jan 11, 2005
    #5
  6. "Mike" <> writes:

    > When and why did a "flash" become a "speedlite"?


    Not a general term, so far as I know; some one brand's tradename.

    When I was first in photography, "flash" might very well be expendable
    bulbs, and we called the electronic things "strobes" mostly (even
    though ours would only flash once before a relatively slow recharge
    interval).
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Jan 11, 2005
    #6
  7. Mike

    Hunt Guest

    In article <-b.net>, says...
    >
    >"Mike" <> writes:
    >
    >> When and why did a "flash" become a "speedlite"?

    >
    >Not a general term, so far as I know; some one brand's tradename.
    >
    >When I was first in photography, "flash" might very well be expendable
    >bulbs, and we called the electronic things "strobes" mostly (even
    >though ours would only flash once before a relatively slow recharge
    >interval).
    >--
    >David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    >RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    >Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/

    SnapshotAlbum/>
    >Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>


    One of the first battry-powered, electronic flashes was Polaroid's "Winkie
    Light." Now, aren't we ever grateful that that name did not stick.

    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Jan 11, 2005
    #7
  8. Mike

    Mike Guest

    "David Dyer-Bennet" <> wrote in message
    news:-b.net...
    > "Mike" <> writes:
    >
    >> When and why did a "flash" become a "speedlite"?

    >
    > Not a general term, so far as I know; some one brand's tradename.
    >
    > When I was first in photography, "flash" might very well be expendable
    > bulbs, and we called the electronic things "strobes" mostly (even
    > though ours would only flash once before a relatively slow recharge
    > interval).
    > --
    > David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    > RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    > Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/>
    > <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    > Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>


    Thanks for the information David, and also to the others responding to my
    original query.

    I've been doing photography a long time also, but only recently into digital
    photography.
    Flash bulbs and strobes are familiar names, but the term "speedlite" is new
    and may very well be a trade name that others have simply adopted.

    BTW David....using a high voltage battery, the "old time" flash units were
    virtually instant in their rate of fire. Those packs were worn on the belt
    line. I believe they were two 90 volt dry batteries in series, but may be
    mistaken on that.

    Again, thanks all for the help.

    Mike
     
    Mike, Jan 11, 2005
    #8
  9. Mike

    Mike Guest

    "Hunt" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <-b.net>, says...
    >>
    >>"Mike" <> writes:
    >>
    >>> When and why did a "flash" become a "speedlite"?

    >>
    >>Not a general term, so far as I know; some one brand's tradename.
    >>
    >>When I was first in photography, "flash" might very well be expendable
    >>bulbs, and we called the electronic things "strobes" mostly (even
    >>though ours would only flash once before a relatively slow recharge
    >>interval).
    >>--
    >>David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    >>RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    >>Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/

    > SnapshotAlbum/>
    >>Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>

    >
    > One of the first battry-powered, electronic flashes was Polaroid's "Winkie
    > Light." Now, aren't we ever grateful that that name did not stick.
    >
    > Hunt
    >

    I still have a "Wink Light". It's more of a 'fill flash' than the usual,
    more powerful "flash", or in today's terms: "Speedlite". It too uses a
    high voltage battery that probably isn't made any longer.

    Mike
     
    Mike, Jan 11, 2005
    #9
  10. Mike wrote:
    > When and why did a "flash" become a "speedlite"?
    >
    > Or is there a difference?
    >
    >

    Back in the 50's and 60's a flash was simply that a flash bulb i a
    reflector. And a Speedlight was an electronic flash such as the 400 watt
    second Graphic used with he press cameras of the day. Had nothing to do
    with marketing.
     
    Jack-of-the-Dust, Jan 11, 2005
    #10
  11. Mike

    Frank ess Guest

    Hunt wrote:
    > In article <-b.net>, says...
    >>
    >> "Mike" <> writes:
    >>
    >>> When and why did a "flash" become a "speedlite"?

    >>
    >> Not a general term, so far as I know; some one brand's tradename.
    >>
    >> When I was first in photography, "flash" might very well be
    >> expendable bulbs, and we called the electronic things "strobes"
    >> mostly (even
    >> though ours would only flash once before a relatively slow recharge
    >> interval).
    >> --
    >> David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>,
    >> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/> RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/>
    >> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    >> Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/
    >> SnapshotAlbum/> Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>

    >
    > One of the first battry-powered, electronic flashes was Polaroid's
    > "Winkie Light." Now, aren't we ever grateful that that name did not
    > stick.
    >


    I'll go along with the (thankfully seldom-heard) "strobe" thing. It may
    have strobed in some situations, but never on my cameras. Plus which,
    some words shouldn't be said out loud.

    One of my very favorite camera combinations was a Polaroid J-66 (or some
    such) with its ASA 1000 "film". It had a little peanut flash that
    flipped up; the flash had a hood that you could twist to face the
    subject, a ceiling, or half-and-half. The ceiling side of the hood had a
    hole in it, pencil lead-size, that put a beauty of a catchlight in a
    subject's eyes. I suppose someone should develop that kind of appliance
    for today's "speedlites". You listening, Sto-Fen?


    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Jan 12, 2005
    #11
  12. Mike

    Jim Townsend Guest

    Mike wrote:

    > When and why did a "flash" become a "speedlite"?
    >
    > Or is there a difference?


    No difference.. It's just a gimmicky name.

    How does an external flash become a GUN... (As in flash gun :)
     
    Jim Townsend, Jan 12, 2005
    #12
  13. Mike

    Confused Guest

    "Mike" <> wrote:

    > > One of the first battry-powered, electronic
    > > flashes was Polaroid's "Winkie Light."
    > > ...

    >
    > I still have a "Wink Light".
    > ...


    Time is cruel... I miss my "Winkie"

    Jeff
     
    Confused, Jan 12, 2005
    #13
  14. Mike

    Mike Guest

    "Confused" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Mike" <> wrote:
    >
    >> > One of the first battry-powered, electronic
    >> > flashes was Polaroid's "Winkie Light."
    >> > ...

    >>
    >> I still have a "Wink Light".
    >> ...

    >
    > Time is cruel... I miss my "Winkie"
    >
    > Jeff


    Well I don't miss paying the cost of Polaroid film. <G>
    Even tried the early color when it was first released. Getting one "keeper"
    out of 8 was a real treat. Then the colors faded in about 3
    months....actually only the red and blue faded....the green didn't fade for
    6 months.

    Mike
     
    Mike, Jan 12, 2005
    #14
  15. Mike

    Joe Makowiec Guest

    On 11 Jan 2005 in rec.photo.digital, Mike wrote:

    > BTW David....using a high voltage battery, the "old time" flash
    > units were virtually instant in their rate of fire. Those packs
    > were worn on the belt line. I believe they were two 90 volt dry
    > batteries in series, but may be mistaken on that.


    The ones on Strobonar handlemounts (marketed by Honeywell in the early
    1970s) were 510 volts; I also had a 510v pack for my Sunpak 622. I still
    have the pack; the NiCds are shot.

    --
    Joe Makowiec
    http://makowiec.org/
    Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe
     
    Joe Makowiec, Jan 12, 2005
    #15
  16. Mike

    Mike Guest

    "Joe Makowiec" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns95DBE119D45A2makowiecatnycapdotrE@24.24.2.167...
    > On 11 Jan 2005 in rec.photo.digital, Mike wrote:
    >
    >> BTW David....using a high voltage battery, the "old time" flash
    >> units were virtually instant in their rate of fire. Those packs
    >> were worn on the belt line. I believe they were two 90 volt dry
    >> batteries in series, but may be mistaken on that.

    >
    > The ones on Strobonar handlemounts (marketed by Honeywell in the early
    > 1970s) were 510 volts; I also had a 510v pack for my Sunpak 622. I still
    > have the pack; the NiCds are shot.
    >
    > --
    > Joe Makowiec
    > http://makowiec.org/
    > Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe


    That sounds more reasonable....510 volts. It's been a while.
    Thanks Joe for the information.
    It sure takes a lot of 1.5v carbon/zinc cells in series to equal 510 volts!

    Mike
     
    Mike, Jan 12, 2005
    #16
  17. "Mike" <> writes:

    > BTW David....using a high voltage battery, the "old time" flash
    > units were virtually instant in their rate of fire. Those packs
    > were worn on the belt line. I believe they were two 90 volt dry
    > batteries in series, but may be mistaken on that.


    Mine had a 510 volt dry-cell pack. The flash was a Braun RL-515. It
    recycled in 2 seconds to full power, which was fantastically fast by
    the standards of the time, but hardly instant.

    Later I owned a Honeywel 892S, which turned out to be a *bad* mistake
    (the Braun got burned in a car crash while on loan to a friend; I made
    the mistake of replacing it with something more "modern".)
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Jan 14, 2005
    #17
  18. "Mike" <> writes:

    > "Joe Makowiec" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns95DBE119D45A2makowiecatnycapdotrE@24.24.2.167...
    >> On 11 Jan 2005 in rec.photo.digital, Mike wrote:
    >>
    >>> BTW David....using a high voltage battery, the "old time" flash
    >>> units were virtually instant in their rate of fire. Those packs
    >>> were worn on the belt line. I believe they were two 90 volt dry
    >>> batteries in series, but may be mistaken on that.

    >>
    >> The ones on Strobonar handlemounts (marketed by Honeywell in the early
    >> 1970s) were 510 volts; I also had a 510v pack for my Sunpak 622. I still
    >> have the pack; the NiCds are shot.


    > That sounds more reasonable....510 volts. It's been a while.
    > Thanks Joe for the information.
    > It sure takes a lot of 1.5v carbon/zinc cells in series to equal 510 volts!


    It sure does! The last time I bought one it cost something like $35,
    as I remember. This was relatively recently, in the 1980s sometime.
    I think I've *still* got the Braun RL515 around somewhere.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Jan 14, 2005
    #18
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