Speed up Vista boot by using two cores

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Carlos, Sep 30, 2008.

  1. Carlos

    Carlos Guest

    This article
    http://www.techwarelabs.com/articles/editorials/dirtyvista/index_2.shtml
    Step Three, items #1, 2, and 3
    states that Vista normally uses only one core during boot, even if you have
    a dual or quad core processor, and that by enabling the additional cores you
    can get a boot time reduction.
    I will quote the important part:

    "Click on Start then type "MSCONFIG" hit enter then click continue through
    the UAC we talked about earlier. This opens a small screen containing some
    interesting startup options, playing with this will allow you to start and
    stop most things that run in the background. The startup tab tells you which
    company each service belongs to so you can use this to try and slim up your
    startup. One of the biggest impacts you can perform to your cold boot is in
    unlocking the potential of your new machine.
    Select the boot tab, then choose advanced options...

    Check off Number of processors, and set that drop down box to the highest
    available number.

    What this is doing is unlocking Windows Vistas ability to use multiple cores
    to start up. When Vista was designed in order to make it compatible with
    older hardware this option was set to (1) so that it will always use only one
    core. By unlocking it you allow Vista to boot using all of your cores this
    can lead to a boot time performance increase of 15-40% for a cold boot and
    about 10% for a warm boot or a return from standby"

    Has anyone confirmed this or has evidence that it can be true?

    Carlos
    Carlos, Sep 30, 2008
    #1
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  2. haven't tried it, but the test to verify is pretty easy. Give it a try and
    see if it actually speeds up your boot.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel


    "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > This article
    > http://www.techwarelabs.com/articles/editorials/dirtyvista/index_2.shtml
    > Step Three, items #1, 2, and 3
    > states that Vista normally uses only one core during boot, even if you
    > have
    > a dual or quad core processor, and that by enabling the additional cores
    > you
    > can get a boot time reduction.
    > I will quote the important part:
    >
    > "Click on Start then type "MSCONFIG" hit enter then click continue through
    > the UAC we talked about earlier. This opens a small screen containing some
    > interesting startup options, playing with this will allow you to start and
    > stop most things that run in the background. The startup tab tells you
    > which
    > company each service belongs to so you can use this to try and slim up
    > your
    > startup. One of the biggest impacts you can perform to your cold boot is
    > in
    > unlocking the potential of your new machine.
    > Select the boot tab, then choose advanced options...
    >
    > Check off Number of processors, and set that drop down box to the highest
    > available number.
    >
    > What this is doing is unlocking Windows Vistas ability to use multiple
    > cores
    > to start up. When Vista was designed in order to make it compatible with
    > older hardware this option was set to (1) so that it will always use only
    > one
    > core. By unlocking it you allow Vista to boot using all of your cores this
    > can lead to a boot time performance increase of 15-40% for a cold boot and
    > about 10% for a warm boot or a return from standby"
    >
    > Has anyone confirmed this or has evidence that it can be true?
    >
    > Carlos
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Sep 30, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Carlos

    fs_fan Guest

    Did not work for me and my Q6600, on a warm boot test.
    To be precise, time between pressing the button and the welcome screen (user
    selection) was reduced by 1.05secs...


    "Carlos" <> escreveu na mensagem
    news:...
    > This article
    > http://www.techwarelabs.com/articles/editorials/dirtyvista/index_2.shtml
    > Step Three, items #1, 2, and 3
    > states that Vista normally uses only one core during boot, even if you
    > have
    > a dual or quad core processor, and that by enabling the additional cores
    > you
    > can get a boot time reduction.
    > I will quote the important part:
    >
    > "Click on Start then type "MSCONFIG" hit enter then click continue through
    > the UAC we talked about earlier. This opens a small screen containing some
    > interesting startup options, playing with this will allow you to start and
    > stop most things that run in the background. The startup tab tells you
    > which
    > company each service belongs to so you can use this to try and slim up
    > your
    > startup. One of the biggest impacts you can perform to your cold boot is
    > in
    > unlocking the potential of your new machine.
    > Select the boot tab, then choose advanced options...
    >
    > Check off Number of processors, and set that drop down box to the highest
    > available number.
    >
    > What this is doing is unlocking Windows Vistas ability to use multiple
    > cores
    > to start up. When Vista was designed in order to make it compatible with
    > older hardware this option was set to (1) so that it will always use only
    > one
    > core. By unlocking it you allow Vista to boot using all of your cores this
    > can lead to a boot time performance increase of 15-40% for a cold boot and
    > about 10% for a warm boot or a return from standby"
    >
    > Has anyone confirmed this or has evidence that it can be true?
    >
    > Carlos
    fs_fan, Sep 30, 2008
    #3
  4. I think that is bunk, what the element tells Vista is:

    "The maximum number of processors that can be utilized by the system;
    all other processors are ignored."

    If one thinks about it for more than 10 seconds the "tweak" seems to be
    a myth, the tweak is built around increasing the number of available
    processors, yet the element suggested is not used to increase the number
    of processors, it is used to limit the number of available processors.
    This element is the same as the /NUMPROC= switch used in the boot.ini on
    previous NT versions:

    /NUMPROC=

    Specifies the number of CPUs that can be used on a multiprocessor
    system. Example: /NUMPROC=2 on a four-way system will prevent Windows
    from using two of the four processors.

    http://www.microsoft.com/taiwan/technet/sysinternals/information/bootini.mspx


    It would probably make more sense if they would suggest changing the
    UseBootProcessorOnly or ForceMaximumProcessors element instead of the
    NumberOfProcessors element, and I am not saying that using these other
    elements would make any difference in the boot time, I don't know if
    using these other elements would make any difference.

    BcdOSLoaderElementTypes Enumeration
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa362670(VS.85).aspx

    John

    Carlos wrote:

    > This article
    > http://www.techwarelabs.com/articles/editorials/dirtyvista/index_2.shtml
    > Step Three, items #1, 2, and 3
    > states that Vista normally uses only one core during boot, even if you have
    > a dual or quad core processor, and that by enabling the additional cores you
    > can get a boot time reduction.
    > I will quote the important part:
    >
    > "Click on Start then type "MSCONFIG" hit enter then click continue through
    > the UAC we talked about earlier. This opens a small screen containing some
    > interesting startup options, playing with this will allow you to start and
    > stop most things that run in the background. The startup tab tells you which
    > company each service belongs to so you can use this to try and slim up your
    > startup. One of the biggest impacts you can perform to your cold boot is in
    > unlocking the potential of your new machine.
    > Select the boot tab, then choose advanced options...
    >
    > Check off Number of processors, and set that drop down box to the highest
    > available number.
    >
    > What this is doing is unlocking Windows Vistas ability to use multiple cores
    > to start up. When Vista was designed in order to make it compatible with
    > older hardware this option was set to (1) so that it will always use only one
    > core. By unlocking it you allow Vista to boot using all of your cores this
    > can lead to a boot time performance increase of 15-40% for a cold boot and
    > about 10% for a warm boot or a return from standby"
    >
    > Has anyone confirmed this or has evidence that it can be true?
    >
    > Carlos
    John John (MVP), Sep 30, 2008
    #4
  5. Carlos

    Carlos Guest

    John,
    Thanks for your feedback.
    Your comprehensive explanation has been quite interesting.
    Carlos

    "John John (MVP)" wrote:

    > I think that is bunk, what the element tells Vista is:
    >
    > "The maximum number of processors that can be utilized by the system;
    > all other processors are ignored."
    >
    > If one thinks about it for more than 10 seconds the "tweak" seems to be
    > a myth, the tweak is built around increasing the number of available
    > processors, yet the element suggested is not used to increase the number
    > of processors, it is used to limit the number of available processors.
    > This element is the same as the /NUMPROC= switch used in the boot.ini on
    > previous NT versions:
    >
    > /NUMPROC=
    >
    > Specifies the number of CPUs that can be used on a multiprocessor
    > system. Example: /NUMPROC=2 on a four-way system will prevent Windows
    > from using two of the four processors.
    >
    > http://www.microsoft.com/taiwan/technet/sysinternals/information/bootini.mspx
    >
    >
    > It would probably make more sense if they would suggest changing the
    > UseBootProcessorOnly or ForceMaximumProcessors element instead of the
    > NumberOfProcessors element, and I am not saying that using these other
    > elements would make any difference in the boot time, I don't know if
    > using these other elements would make any difference.
    >
    > BcdOSLoaderElementTypes Enumeration
    > http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa362670(VS.85).aspx
    >
    > John
    >
    > Carlos wrote:
    >
    > > This article
    > > http://www.techwarelabs.com/articles/editorials/dirtyvista/index_2.shtml
    > > Step Three, items #1, 2, and 3
    > > states that Vista normally uses only one core during boot, even if you have
    > > a dual or quad core processor, and that by enabling the additional cores you
    > > can get a boot time reduction.
    > > I will quote the important part:
    > >
    > > "Click on Start then type "MSCONFIG" hit enter then click continue through
    > > the UAC we talked about earlier. This opens a small screen containing some
    > > interesting startup options, playing with this will allow you to start and
    > > stop most things that run in the background. The startup tab tells you which
    > > company each service belongs to so you can use this to try and slim up your
    > > startup. One of the biggest impacts you can perform to your cold boot is in
    > > unlocking the potential of your new machine.
    > > Select the boot tab, then choose advanced options...
    > >
    > > Check off Number of processors, and set that drop down box to the highest
    > > available number.
    > >
    > > What this is doing is unlocking Windows Vistas ability to use multiple cores
    > > to start up. When Vista was designed in order to make it compatible with
    > > older hardware this option was set to (1) so that it will always use only one
    > > core. By unlocking it you allow Vista to boot using all of your cores this
    > > can lead to a boot time performance increase of 15-40% for a cold boot and
    > > about 10% for a warm boot or a return from standby"
    > >
    > > Has anyone confirmed this or has evidence that it can be true?
    > >
    > > Carlos

    >
    >
    Carlos, Sep 30, 2008
    #5
  6. You're welcome, Carlos.

    John

    Carlos wrote:

    > John,
    > Thanks for your feedback.
    > Your comprehensive explanation has been quite interesting.
    > Carlos
    >
    > "John John (MVP)" wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I think that is bunk, what the element tells Vista is:
    >>
    >>"The maximum number of processors that can be utilized by the system;
    >>all other processors are ignored."
    >>
    >>If one thinks about it for more than 10 seconds the "tweak" seems to be
    >>a myth, the tweak is built around increasing the number of available
    >>processors, yet the element suggested is not used to increase the number
    >>of processors, it is used to limit the number of available processors.
    >>This element is the same as the /NUMPROC= switch used in the boot.ini on
    >>previous NT versions:
    >>
    >>/NUMPROC=
    >>
    >>Specifies the number of CPUs that can be used on a multiprocessor
    >>system. Example: /NUMPROC=2 on a four-way system will prevent Windows
    >>from using two of the four processors.
    >>
    >>http://www.microsoft.com/taiwan/technet/sysinternals/information/bootini.mspx
    >>
    >>
    >>It would probably make more sense if they would suggest changing the
    >>UseBootProcessorOnly or ForceMaximumProcessors element instead of the
    >>NumberOfProcessors element, and I am not saying that using these other
    >>elements would make any difference in the boot time, I don't know if
    >>using these other elements would make any difference.
    >>
    >>BcdOSLoaderElementTypes Enumeration
    >>http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa362670(VS.85).aspx
    >>
    >>John
    >>
    >>Carlos wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>This article
    >>>http://www.techwarelabs.com/articles/editorials/dirtyvista/index_2.shtml
    >>>Step Three, items #1, 2, and 3
    >>>states that Vista normally uses only one core during boot, even if you have
    >>>a dual or quad core processor, and that by enabling the additional cores you
    >>>can get a boot time reduction.
    >>>I will quote the important part:
    >>>
    >>>"Click on Start then type "MSCONFIG" hit enter then click continue through
    >>>the UAC we talked about earlier. This opens a small screen containing some
    >>>interesting startup options, playing with this will allow you to start and
    >>>stop most things that run in the background. The startup tab tells you which
    >>>company each service belongs to so you can use this to try and slim up your
    >>>startup. One of the biggest impacts you can perform to your cold boot is in
    >>>unlocking the potential of your new machine.
    >>>Select the boot tab, then choose advanced options...
    >>>
    >>>Check off Number of processors, and set that drop down box to the highest
    >>>available number.
    >>>
    >>>What this is doing is unlocking Windows Vistas ability to use multiple cores
    >>>to start up. When Vista was designed in order to make it compatible with
    >>>older hardware this option was set to (1) so that it will always use only one
    >>>core. By unlocking it you allow Vista to boot using all of your cores this
    >>>can lead to a boot time performance increase of 15-40% for a cold boot and
    >>>about 10% for a warm boot or a return from standby"
    >>>
    >>>Has anyone confirmed this or has evidence that it can be true?
    >>>
    >>>Carlos

    >>
    >>
    John John (MVP), Sep 30, 2008
    #6
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