Speed necessary for VOIP

Discussion in 'VOIP' started by Drew Cutter, Jan 22, 2005.

  1. Drew Cutter

    Drew Cutter Guest

    I'm looking into satellite Internet connection for my truck. Their is
    the possibility of wireless voip . But can't decide between two
    different antenna / satellites . What is the necessary speed for
    Internet connection ?
     
    Drew Cutter, Jan 22, 2005
    #1
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  2. Drew Cutter

    Carlos Guest

    Most IP Providers says they do not work with Satellite conection.
     
    Carlos, Jan 23, 2005
    #2
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  3. Drew Cutter

    Roy Guest

    The problem is not speed but latency.


    On 22 Jan 2005 16:14:10 GMT, Drew Cutter <> wrote:

    >I'm looking into satellite Internet connection for my truck. Their is
    >the possibility of wireless voip . But can't decide between two
    >different antenna / satellites . What is the necessary speed for
    >Internet connection ?
     
    Roy, Jan 23, 2005
    #3
  4. Drew Cutter

    Drew Cutter Guest

    The latency issue is what i wonder about. The one satellite system that
    requires you to be stationary and other work while moving. Supposedly
    the stationary will do voip. hmmm.
     
    Drew Cutter, Jan 23, 2005
    #4
  5. Drew Cutter

    Alan Guest

    Actually there are a variety of issues to look at, and successful use
    of VoIP is going to depend not just on bandwidth. Another issue is -
    what quality are you expecting .. is intelligibility the only concern
    or do you want toll quality?

    VoIP can operate over relatively low speed connections (say 128k)
    however quality will fall apart if there is ANY data traffic sharing
    the link. If any data is sharing the link then it would be desirable
    to use higher speeds - say 300k upwards.

    Delay can be significant however in many cases the user can tolerate
    quite long delays. For highly interactive discussions then one way
    delays of 100mS or so can become noticeable however for more general
    chatting delays of 300-400mS are tolerable. Obviously some satellite
    connections can introduce longer delays and this would be intrusive.
    More info on the www.voiptroubleshooter.com web site

    Alan
     
    Alan, Jan 29, 2005
    #5
  6. Drew Cutter

    Mitel Lurker Guest

    In article <> "Alan"
    <> writes:


    >Actually there are a variety of issues to look at, and successful use
    >of VoIP is going to depend not just on bandwidth. Another issue is -
    >what quality are you expecting .. is intelligibility the only concern
    >or do you want toll quality?


    Our wide acceptance of cellular phones and their often times marginal
    connection quality (with surprisingly few complaints) I think has shown,
    at least for personal use, that the desire for cheap & convenience far
    outweighs any desire for quality. Of course business/professional use is a
    whole other matter. I might be willing to talk to a salesperson over a
    marginal cell phone connection to give them driving directions to my place
    of business, but when I call them to do business with them, that
    connection had better be "toll quality".

    >VoIP can operate over relatively low speed connections (say 128k)
    >however quality will fall apart if there is ANY data traffic sharing
    >the link. If any data is sharing the link then it would be desirable
    >to use higher speeds - say 300k upwards.


    This is largely true although with G.729 compression the bandwidth
    requirements of VOIP are far less. Of course with compression, quality
    suffers and we're back to our proverbial "celluar-grade" connection again.

    >Delay can be significant however in many cases the user can tolerate
    >quite long delays. For highly interactive discussions then one way
    >delays of 100mS or so can become noticeable however for more general
    >chatting delays of 300-400mS are tolerable. Obviously some satellite
    >connections can introduce longer delays and this would be intrusive.


    With VOIP a little packet latency can usually be tolerated, while packet
    loss and packet sequencing problems cannot. I.E., there's no way to
    "resend a lost word or syllable" and have it still make sense when it
    finally gets to the other end. This is why successful "toll quality" VOIP
    implementations must include some type of QOS (Quality Of Service) either
    802.1p/q and/or V-lan'ing or else utilize its own exclusive network.

    VOIP over the public Internet can sometimes yield "acceptable" results so
    long as the voice call never encounters any congested paths. Once it
    encounters a bottleneck, anywhere along the way, call quality will suffer.
    Over severely congested paths a VOIP call will become unintelligible
    gibberish.

    >More info on the www.voiptroubleshooter.com web site
     
    Mitel Lurker, Jan 29, 2005
    #6
  7. Drew Cutter

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Mitel Lurker wrote:
    ....
    > With VOIP a little packet latency can usually be tolerated, while packet
    > loss and packet sequencing problems cannot. I.E., there's no way to
    > "resend a lost word or syllable" and have it still make sense when it
    > finally gets to the other end. This is why successful "toll quality" VOIP
    > implementations must include some type of QOS (Quality Of Service) either
    > 802.1p/q and/or V-lan'ing or else utilize its own exclusive network.
    >
    > VOIP over the public Internet can sometimes yield "acceptable" results so
    > long as the voice call never encounters any congested paths. Once it
    > encounters a bottleneck, anywhere along the way, call quality will suffer.
    > Over severely congested paths a VOIP call will become unintelligible
    > gibberish.


    I have VoIP over cable - does that necessarily go "over the public
    internet" or are there other choices?
     
    Rick Merrill, Jan 30, 2005
    #7
  8. Drew Cutter

    Mitel Lurker Guest

    In article <> Rick Merrill
    <> writes:


    >> VOIP over the public Internet can sometimes yield "acceptable" results so
    >> long as the voice call never encounters any congested paths. Once it
    >> encounters a bottleneck, anywhere along the way, call quality will suffer.
    >> Over severely congested paths a VOIP call will become unintelligible
    >> gibberish.


    >I have VoIP over cable - does that necessarily go "over the public
    >internet" or are there other choices?


    If you mean you have cablemodem/DSL service, yes, that's the "public
    internet". The only other choice is a private, dedicated WAN (wide area
    network) which many large companies have. Very expensive, but extremely
    efficient.
     
    Mitel Lurker, Jan 30, 2005
    #8
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