spanned volumes - is this correct?

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by David K, Nov 21, 2003.

  1. David K

    David K Guest

    Page 299 of Sybex's 70-215 book, 2nd ed:
    "In order to create a spanned volume, you must have at least two
    drives installed on your computer and each drive must contain
    unallocated space."

    I was under the impression that a spanned volume is for enlarging the
    capacity of a volume on a dynamic disk, without having to wipe it
    clean first. Why should the first drive contain unallocated space?

    Dave
    David K, Nov 21, 2003
    #1
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  2. David K

    Herb Martin Guest

    "David K" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Page 299 of Sybex's 70-215 book, 2nd ed:
    > "In order to create a spanned volume, you must have at least two
    > drives installed on your computer and each drive must contain
    > unallocated space."


    Almost (see below) -- but not quite. You might actually be able to
    EXTEND a volume (not C:) from the first drive onto "unallocated space"
    on a second drive.

    The original above is a (sloppy) description of the NORMAL (but not the
    only) case.

    Typical Sybex sloppiness. (Actually this is minor, it is usually worse.)
    Find
    a better book - the built-in Help, Resouce Kit, and MS site are MUCH
    better.

    > I was under the impression that a spanned volume is for enlarging the
    > capacity of a volume on a dynamic disk,


    You can enlarge that way (as I clarified above) OR you can make a
    spanned volume initially as the book you read was claiming (solely.)
    Two Choices.

    > without having to wipe it
    > clean first. Why should the first drive contain unallocated space?


    Nothing about "with unallocated space" implies you must wipe it clean, IF
    you have some free space on that drive, e.g., C: might take 5 Gig of a 40
    Gig
    drive and you could use the other 35 Gig for additional volumes inclucing a
    span.


    --
    Herb Martin
    >
    > Dave
    Herb Martin, Nov 21, 2003
    #2
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  3. David K

    Kline Sphere Guest

    > You might actually be able to
    >EXTEND a volume (not C:)


    Should really say here, a volumn that does not contain either the
    system and/or boot volume(s).
    Kline Sphere, Nov 21, 2003
    #3
  4. David K

    Herb Martin Guest

    "Kline Sphere" <.> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > You might actually be able to
    > >EXTEND a volume (not C:)

    >
    > Should really say here, a volumn that does not contain either the
    > system and/or boot volume(s).


    Yes, my "(not C:)" was already a digression and I didn't want to get into
    the full rules -- especially since most people find that C: is both of them.

    Some people have the boot volume (SystemRoot) on another volume
    letter -- and I have once at least had the System volume on Drive D:
    (don't ask <grin>)

    I just didn't want to digress further. <big grin>

    --
    Herb Martin
    Herb Martin, Nov 22, 2003
    #4
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