...Soviet cheese cutter

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Tzortzakakis Dimitris, Sep 24, 2010.

  1. Tzortzakakis Dimitris, Sep 24, 2010
    #1
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  2. Tzortzakakis Dimitris

    tony cooper Guest

    On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 19:49:55 +0300, "Tzortzakakis Dimitris"
    <> wrote:

    >http://www.flickr.com/photos/44148682@N02/5020911338/
    >


    OK, I gotta ask: what's so special about it? We have one just like
    it except the unit is all one casting except for the roller and wire.
    I suspect there are thousands of similar cheese cutters around.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Sep 25, 2010
    #2
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  3. Tzortzakakis Dimitris

    NameHere Guest

    On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 19:49:55 +0300, "Tzortzakakis Dimitris"
    <> wrote:

    >http://www.flickr.com/photos/44148682@N02/5020911338/
    >


    A very effective cutter design. I don't understand the disparaging comment
    on the photo. Though I like the more modern ones like the one I have in my
    kitchen drawer and use all the time. Where the roller is on a carriage that
    slides back and forth and locks in place with a lock-nut. Similar to
    <http://www.kitchenfantasy.com/images/GT-3091.jpg>

    Then you can adjust for slice thickness. They work particularly well for
    that last 1/4th inch thick slab that you want to slice into two or three
    more slices. Lay the cheese flat on a surface and then roll the slicer
    across it, held in a vertical orientation, pressing down a bit to hold the
    cheese firmly to the counter or slicing board. Instead of dealing with
    shredded mozzarella cheese for pizzas and the mess that makes, a simple
    covering of thin slices is faster and works better, with no bite going left
    uncheesed.

    I haven't run across a better slicer design. Though I have had to replace
    the cutting wire a couple times on mine. And beefed-up the roller with
    small bearings from having used it so much that the roller ends got worn a
    bit. Originally just simple screws acting as axles and wearing away the
    inside of the roller causing slop. Used guitar strings work well for
    replacement wire. A "B" or thicker gauge of "high-E" string suggested,
    though from my 12-string I have the benefit of using a discarded "high-D"
    string (from my preferred "light gauge" brand) which works best for a good
    combo of strength and lesser cutting resistance. On the upside I have one
    that will now not wear out anymore and it's better than anything I can find
    in any store.

    The rest of the discussion threads had the usual troll's-dreck and this was
    the only thing worth commenting on.

    One more thing, the image of this cheese slicer at Flickr royally sucks. It
    could have been taken in anyone's kitchen anywhere in the world and been
    just as mundane and pointless and ruined just as much by also using flash.
    NameHere, Sep 25, 2010
    #3
  4. ? "Diogenes" <> ?????? ??? ??????
    news:...
    > On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 22:26:16 -0400, tony cooper
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 19:49:55 +0300, "Tzortzakakis Dimitris"
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>>http://www.flickr.com/photos/44148682@N02/5020911338/
    >>>

    >>
    >>OK, I gotta ask: what's so special about it? We have one just like
    >>it except the unit is all one casting except for the roller and wire.
    >>I suspect there are thousands of similar cheese cutters around.

    >
    > I was expecting a photo of a large Russian woman ripping off a fart.

    Yeah, especially after a generous helping of stew, blimenia and kvac:)


    --
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
    major in electrical engineering
    mechanized infantry reservist
    hordad AT otenet DOT gr
    Tzortzakakis Dimitris, Sep 25, 2010
    #4
  5. ? "tony cooper" <> ?????? ??? ??????
    news:...
    > On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 19:49:55 +0300, "Tzortzakakis Dimitris"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>http://www.flickr.com/photos/44148682@N02/5020911338/
    >>

    >
    > OK, I gotta ask: what's so special about it? We have one just like
    > it except the unit is all one casting except for the roller and wire.
    > I suspect there are thousands of similar cheese cutters around.

    ....Because it's soviet, I have also a slide projector. I used to have a
    couple of Zeniths, one with aperture priority and the other manual; and
    another one, a twin lens reflex with 120 film, but I don't remember its
    brand.


    --
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
    major in electrical engineering
    mechanized infantry reservist
    hordad AT otenet DOT gr
    Tzortzakakis Dimitris, Sep 25, 2010
    #5
  6. Tzortzakakis Dimitris

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 25 Sep 2010 14:57:20 +0300, "Tzortzakakis Dimitris"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >? "tony cooper" <> ?????? ??? ??????
    >news:...
    >> On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 19:49:55 +0300, "Tzortzakakis Dimitris"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>http://www.flickr.com/photos/44148682@N02/5020911338/
    >>>

    >>
    >> OK, I gotta ask: what's so special about it? We have one just like
    >> it except the unit is all one casting except for the roller and wire.
    >> I suspect there are thousands of similar cheese cutters around.


    >...Because it's soviet,


    I can see the interest in a Russian object if that object differs
    significantly from the same object made in another country, but that
    cheese cutter is a standard design that can be found in many
    countries.

    > I have also a slide projector. I used to have a
    >couple of Zeniths, one with aperture priority and the other manual; and
    >another one, a twin lens reflex with 120 film, but I don't remember its
    >brand.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Sep 25, 2010
    #6
  7. Tzortzakakis Dimitris

    John Turco Guest

    Tzortzakakis Dimitris wrote:
    >
    > ? "tony cooper" <> ?????? ??? ??????
    > news:...
    > > On Fri, 24 Sep 2010 19:49:55 +0300, "Tzortzakakis Dimitris"
    > > <> wrote:
    > >
    > >>http://www.flickr.com/photos/44148682@N02/5020911338/
    > >>

    > >
    > > OK, I gotta ask: what's so special about it? We have one just like
    > > it except the unit is all one casting except for the roller and wire.
    > > I suspect there are thousands of similar cheese cutters around.

    > ...Because it's soviet, I have also a slide projector. I used to have a
    > couple of Zeniths, one with aperture priority and the other manual; and
    > another one, a twin lens reflex with 120 film, but I don't remember its
    > brand.



    "Zenith" was a famous U.S. manufacturer of radios and TV sets, throughout
    most of the 20th century. Today, it's basically little more than a brand
    name, owned by the Korean corporate giant, "LG Electronics" (formerly
    ("GoldStar").

    --
    Cordially,
    John Turco <>

    Marie's Musings <http://fairiesandtails.blogspot.com>
    John Turco, Oct 31, 2010
    #7
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