Southern Cross Cable

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Shane, Jun 16, 2007.

  1. Shane

    Shane Guest

    Does anyone know the actual capacity of the Southern Cross cable?
    I have an old article saying
    The Southern Cross Cable System came live late in 2000, greatly increasing
    the potential for data traffic and broadband Internet Access between
    Australasia and the rest of the world via the United States. It is
    compromised of state of the art fibre optic cabling presently designed to
    deliver 120 gigabits per second capacity. During 2002 the System will be
    upgraded to 240 gigabits per second, with the continued potential to
    increase to a total capacity of 480 gigabits per second at a future date.

    Obviously that is _way_ out of date.
    --
    A physicist, a mathematician and a computer scientist discuss what is
    better: a wife or a girlfriend.
    The physicist: "A girlfriend. You still have freedom to experiment."
    The mathematician: "A wife. You have security."
    The computer scientist: "Both. When I'm not with my wife, she thinks I'm
    with my girlfriend. With my girlfriend it's vice versa. And I can be with
    my computer without anyone disturbing me..."
     
    Shane, Jun 16, 2007
    #1
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  2. Shane

    peterwn Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > Does anyone know the actual capacity of the Southern Cross cable?
    > I have an old article saying
    > The Southern Cross Cable System came live late in 2000, greatly increasing
    > the potential for data traffic and broadband Internet Access between
    > Australasia and the rest of the world via the United States. It is
    > compromised of state of the art fibre optic cabling presently designed to
    > deliver 120 gigabits per second capacity. During 2002 the System will be
    > upgraded to 240 gigabits per second, with the continued potential to
    > increase to a total capacity of 480 gigabits per second at a future date.
    >


    As technology improves, more tricks become available for squeezing more
    capacity out of it. They could in some cases be horrendously expensive,
    but would still be economic to apply.

    When the first trans Atlantic phone cable was installed, it fairly soon
    reached saturation despite calling costs of tens of dollars a minute (in
    todays prices).

    Its capacity was extended by a 'real time' switching device which
    dynamically allocated a 'slot' when one party started talking and
    released it when the other party started talking in reply. The cost of
    the equipment (probably using vacuum tubes, and perhaps mercury tube
    delay lines and high speed relays) was horrendous, but was far more
    economic than laying a second cable. In comparison VOIP technology is
    trivial and cheap, and if available at the time this and other digital
    technologies such as compression would have screwed even more capacity
    out of the cable for speech, telegraph and telex (no data then).
     
    peterwn, Jun 16, 2007
    #2
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  3. Shane

    lolinternet Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > Does anyone know the actual capacity of the Southern Cross cable?
    > I have an old article saying
    > The Southern Cross Cable System came live late in 2000, greatly increasing
    > the potential for data traffic and broadband Internet Access between
    > Australasia and the rest of the world via the United States. It is
    > compromised of state of the art fibre optic cabling presently designed to
    > deliver 120 gigabits per second capacity. During 2002 the System will be
    > upgraded to 240 gigabits per second, with the continued potential to
    > increase to a total capacity of 480 gigabits per second at a future date.
    >
    > Obviously that is _way_ out of date.


    http://www.southerncrosscables.com/public/Network/default.cfm
     
    lolinternet, Jun 16, 2007
    #3
  4. Shane

    El Chippy Guest

    On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 13:42:13 +1200, Shane wrote:

    > Does anyone know the actual capacity of the Southern Cross cable? I have
    > an old article saying
    > The Southern Cross Cable System came live late in 2000, greatly
    > increasing the potential for data traffic and broadband Internet Access
    > between Australasia and the rest of the world via the United States. It
    > is compromised of state of the art fibre optic cabling presently
    > designed to deliver 120 gigabits per second capacity. During 2002 the
    > System will be upgraded to 240 gigabits per second, with the continued
    > potential to increase to a total capacity of 480 gigabits per second at
    > a future date.
    >
    > Obviously that is _way_ out of date.


    summary:
    Currently 240Gbps protected (double that unprotected), possible expansion
    to 1.2Tbps+ (protected?). Tenders are under way for next round of
    Upgrades.

    Full story:
    http://www.southerncrosscables.com/public/home/whatsnewdetail.cfm?
    WhatsNewID=10

    http://www.southerncrosscables.com/public/Network/default.cfm
     
    El Chippy, Jun 16, 2007
    #4
  5. Shane

    Mark C Guest

    Shane <-a-geek.net> wrote in
    news:f4vf25$om7$:

    > ... It is compromised of state of the art fibre
    > optic cabling presently designed to deliver 120 gigabits per
    > second capacity. During 2002 the System will be upgraded to 240
    > gigabits per second, with the continued potential to increase to
    > a total capacity of 480 gigabits per second at a future date.


    A 21 August 2006 article said this:

    | The 240-gigabit capacity of the Southern Cross Cable could be
    | increased in the interim by investing in compression technology
    | and pumping more data through the existing cable, he says.
    |
    | Southern Cross announced the first step toward doing that last
    | week, contracting Canada's Nortel to upgrade equipment at its
    | two access points in the US.


    A 14 August 2006 article said this:

    | The joint venture that owns the Southern Cross Cable has taken
    | the first step toward increasing the capacity of the 240
    | gigabit subsea network, which carries the bulk of Internet and
    | communications traffic to and from New Zealand, Australia and
    | the United States.
    | ...
    | While there will be no immediate increase in capacity, the
    | multimillion-dollar project will mean the bandwidth of the
    | terrestrial cable could easily be increased from 200 gigabits
    | per second to 540 gigabits per second and could be hiked to
    | about 3 terabits per second if required, Nortel says.

    http://www.redorbit.com/news/technology/619425/southern_cross_set_for_growth/index.html

    I try and keep a lookout for Southern Cross news, but don't have
    any more recent news.

    Their website says this:

    | The final stage of its capacity expansion to 240 Gigabits was
    | completed in January 2003...
    | The network still has the potential to be expanded to 1 Terabit
    | and Southern Cross continues to monitor demand to determine when
    | further expansions will be introduced.

    http://www.southerncrosscables.com/public/AboutUs/default.cfm?PageID=43

    Mark
     
    Mark C, Jun 16, 2007
    #5
  6. Shane

    Shane Guest

    Shane wrote:

    > Does anyone know the actual capacity of the Southern Cross cable?
    > I have an old article saying
    > The Southern Cross Cable System came live late in 2000, greatly increasing
    > the potential for data traffic and broadband Internet Access between
    > Australasia and the rest of the world via the United States. It is
    > compromised of state of the art fibre optic cabling presently designed to
    > deliver 120 gigabits per second capacity. During 2002 the System will be
    > upgraded to 240 gigabits per second, with the continued potential to
    > increase to a total capacity of 480 gigabits per second at a future date.
    >
    > Obviously that is _way_ out of date.


    Nice, thanks guys!
    Their site made interesting reading to.
    --
    Q: What is often used by Canadians to help solve certain differential
    equations?
    A: the Lacrosse transform.
     
    Shane, Jun 16, 2007
    #6
  7. On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 14:30:34 +1200, El Chippy wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 13:42:13 +1200, Shane wrote:
    >
    >> Does anyone know the actual capacity of the Southern Cross cable? I have
    >> an old article saying
    >> The Southern Cross Cable System came live late in 2000, greatly
    >> increasing the potential for data traffic and broadband Internet Access
    >> between Australasia and the rest of the world via the United States. It
    >> is compromised of state of the art fibre optic cabling presently
    >> designed to deliver 120 gigabits per second capacity. During 2002 the
    >> System will be upgraded to 240 gigabits per second, with the continued
    >> potential to increase to a total capacity of 480 gigabits per second at
    >> a future date.
    >>
    >> Obviously that is _way_ out of date.

    >
    > summary:
    > Currently 240Gbps protected (double that unprotected), possible expansion
    > to 1.2Tbps+ (protected?). Tenders are under way for next round of
    > Upgrades.
    >
    > Full story:
    > http://www.southerncrosscables.com/public/home/whatsnewdetail.cfm?
    > WhatsNewID=10
    >
    > http://www.southerncrosscables.com/public/Network/default.cfm


    The southern Cross cable is 50% owned by Telecom NZ (controlling
    interest), and is currently only 50% utilised.

    With capacity expected to be upgraded to 1.2 terrabits/second (5 times
    increase on current capacity) demand still has not come anywhere near
    outstripping supply due to the extortionately high prices set by Telecom!


    --
    Jonathan Walker

    "You'll have to excuse me — I have a long
    bath and a short dress to get into."
     
    Jonathan Walker, Jun 16, 2007
    #7
  8. Shane

    El Chippy Guest

    On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 19:02:42 +1200, Jonathan Walker wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 14:30:34 +1200, El Chippy wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 13:42:13 +1200, Shane wrote:
    >>
    >>> Does anyone know the actual capacity of the Southern Cross cable? I
    >>> have an old article saying
    >>> The Southern Cross Cable System came live late in 2000, greatly
    >>> increasing the potential for data traffic and broadband Internet
    >>> Access between Australasia and the rest of the world via the United
    >>> States. It is compromised of state of the art fibre optic cabling
    >>> presently designed to deliver 120 gigabits per second capacity.
    >>> During 2002 the System will be upgraded to 240 gigabits per second,
    >>> with the continued potential to increase to a total capacity of 480
    >>> gigabits per second at a future date.
    >>>
    >>> Obviously that is _way_ out of date.

    >>
    >> summary:
    >> Currently 240Gbps protected (double that unprotected), possible
    >> expansion to 1.2Tbps+ (protected?). Tenders are under way for next
    >> round of Upgrades.
    >>
    >> Full story:
    >> http://www.southerncrosscables.com/public/home/whatsnewdetail.cfm?
    >> WhatsNewID=10
    >>
    >> http://www.southerncrosscables.com/public/Network/default.cfm

    >
    > The southern Cross cable is 50% owned by Telecom NZ (controlling
    > interest), and is currently only 50% utilised.
    >
    > With capacity expected to be upgraded to 1.2 terrabits/second (5 times
    > increase on current capacity) demand still has not come anywhere near
    > outstripping supply due to the extortionately high prices set by
    > Telecom!


    Yawn, another whinging linux user who expects something for next to
    nothing. The are a company, doing what companies are legally obilgated
    to do.. make money. If the market is willing to pay it they will charge
    it.

    If you dont like it you could:
    a) set up in competition, under cut them and make some of those $$$ for
    yourself while providing everyone else value for money.
    b) dont use there services.

    If their pricing was extortionatley high why hasn't someone else set up
    in competition?
    And how do they pay for the upgrades? with the money they are making now
    of course.
     
    El Chippy, Jun 16, 2007
    #8
  9. Shane

    Dave Taylor Guest

    Shane <-a-geek.net> wrote in news:f4vf25$om7$1
    @lust.ihug.co.nz:

    > Obviously that is _way_ out of date.


    Read up on Karen:
    http://www.karen.net.nz/home/
    The bandwidth comes from somewhere.

    --
    Ciao, Dave
     
    Dave Taylor, Jun 18, 2007
    #9
  10. Shane

    El Chippy Guest

    On Mon, 18 Jun 2007 23:55:30 +1200, Dave Taylor wrote:

    > Read up on Karen:
    > http://www.karen.net.nz/home/
    > The bandwidth comes from somewhere.


    As far as i can see it doesn't actually say how much international
    bandwidth there is. Judging by the traffic graphs it looks like a 1Gbps
    International Link.
    Going by the access points it is using the Southern Cross Cable. Vector
    (takapuna) -> Verizon Business (sydney).

    Hmmm, now how do I get a research project on international multimedia and
    gaming bandwidth availability and testing. ;)
     
    El Chippy, Jun 18, 2007
    #10
  11. Shane

    Bugalugs Guest

    Jonathan Walker wrote:
    > On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 14:30:34 +1200, El Chippy wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 13:42:13 +1200, Shane wrote:
    >>
    >>> Does anyone know the actual capacity of the Southern Cross cable? I have
    >>> an old article saying
    >>> The Southern Cross Cable System came live late in 2000, greatly
    >>> increasing the potential for data traffic and broadband Internet Access
    >>> between Australasia and the rest of the world via the United States. It
    >>> is compromised of state of the art fibre optic cabling presently
    >>> designed to deliver 120 gigabits per second capacity. During 2002 the
    >>> System will be upgraded to 240 gigabits per second, with the continued
    >>> potential to increase to a total capacity of 480 gigabits per second at
    >>> a future date.
    >>>
    >>> Obviously that is _way_ out of date.

    >> summary:
    >> Currently 240Gbps protected (double that unprotected), possible expansion
    >> to 1.2Tbps+ (protected?). Tenders are under way for next round of
    >> Upgrades.
    >>
    >> Full story:
    >> http://www.southerncrosscables.com/public/home/whatsnewdetail.cfm?
    >> WhatsNewID=10
    >>
    >> http://www.southerncrosscables.com/public/Network/default.cfm

    >
    > The southern Cross cable is 50% owned by Telecom NZ (controlling
    > interest), and is currently only 50% utilised.


    Does Telecom still own 12% of ANZCAN


    >
    > With capacity expected to be upgraded to 1.2 terrabits/second (5 times
    > increase on current capacity) demand still has not come anywhere near
    > outstripping supply due to the extortionately high prices set by Telecom!
    >
    >
     
    Bugalugs, Jun 19, 2007
    #11
  12. On Tue, 19 Jun 2007 13:27:16 +1200, Bugalugs wrote:

    > Does Telecom still own 12% of ANZCAN


    Don't know.


    --
    Jonathan Walker

    "You'll have to excuse me — I have a long
    bath and a short dress to get into."
     
    Jonathan Walker, Jun 19, 2007
    #12
  13. Shane

    Dave Taylor Guest

    El Chippy <> wrote in
    news::

    > Hmmm, now how do I get a research project on international multimedia
    > and gaming bandwidth availability and testing. ;)


    Apply for a govt grant?

    --
    Ciao, Dave
     
    Dave Taylor, Jun 19, 2007
    #13
  14. On Tue, 19 Jun 2007 20:18:00 +1200, Jonathan Walker wrote:

    >> Does Telecom still own 12% of ANZCAN

    >
    > Don't know.


    But given the fact that as of 2002 there was only one section of that cable
    still operating - that between Australia and Norfolk Islands - a 4th
    segment (NZ to Norfolk) having been turned down in 2002, it
    is highly unlikely that there will be a buyer for an old cable that is no
    longer in full operation.

    Thus it is most likely that Telecom still does own a percentage of the
    ANZCAN cable.


    --
    Jonathan Walker

    "You'll have to excuse me — I have a long
    bath and a short dress to get into."
     
    Jonathan Walker, Jun 19, 2007
    #14
  15. Shane

    Bugalugs Guest

    Jonathan Walker wrote:
    > On Tue, 19 Jun 2007 20:18:00 +1200, Jonathan Walker wrote:
    >
    >>> Does Telecom still own 12% of ANZCAN

    >> Don't know.

    >
    > But given the fact that as of 2002 there was only one section of that cable
    > still operating - that between Australia and Norfolk Islands - a 4th
    > segment (NZ to Norfolk) having been turned down in 2002, it
    > is highly unlikely that there will be a buyer for an old cable that is no
    > longer in full operation.


    Dahm.. I put a LOT of work into that project.('bout 4 years)

    Was it mechanical failure or outdated technology ??

    >
    > Thus it is most likely that Telecom still does own a percentage of the
    > ANZCAN cable.
    >
    >
     
    Bugalugs, Jun 20, 2007
    #15
  16. On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 12:35:09 +1200, Bugalugs wrote:

    >> But given the fact that as of 2002 there was only one section of that
    >> cable still operating - that between Australia and Norfolk Islands - a
    >> 4th segment (NZ to Norfolk) having been turned down in 2002, it is
    >> highly unlikely that there will be a buyer for an old cable that is no
    >> longer in full operation.

    >
    > Dahm.. I put a LOT of work into that project.('bout 4 years)
    >
    > Was it mechanical failure or outdated technology ??


    From what I read, simply outdated.

    The southern Cross cable is capable of approx 6 million voice circuts. The
    ANZCAN was capable of only 1300ish circuts (which was itself an
    improvement over the previous cable, laid in the '60s, which could only
    deliver approx 70 circuts).


    --
    Jonathan Walker

    "You'll have to excuse me — I have a long
    bath and a short dress to get into."
     
    Jonathan Walker, Jun 20, 2007
    #16
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