Sound input levels

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by ferret, Oct 28, 2004.

  1. ferret

    ferret Guest

    Hi All,
    I know there are people out there that can help me. I want to connect a
    record deck, direct from the ceramic cartridge, to the I/P of a AC97 based
    sound card. Will I need a pre-amp? What is the signal level requirements of
    the typical sound card?

    Many thanks

    Ferret.
    ferret, Oct 28, 2004
    #1
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  2. ferret

    HF Guest

    Yes
    "ferret" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    > I know there are people out there that can help me. I want to connect

    a
    > record deck, direct from the ceramic cartridge, to the I/P of a AC97 based
    > sound card. Will I need a pre-amp? What is the signal level requirements

    of
    > the typical sound card?
    >
    > Many thanks
    >
    > Ferret.
    >
    >



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    HF, Oct 28, 2004
    #2
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  3. ferret

    Thor Guest

    "ferret" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    > I know there are people out there that can help me. I want to connect
    > a record deck, direct from the ceramic cartridge, to the I/P of a AC97
    > based sound card. Will I need a pre-amp? What is the signal level
    > requirements of the typical sound card?


    yes you will most likely need a pre-amp, since sound cards take line-level
    signals, and phono players do not have line-level outputs unless they have
    an internal pre-amp. A good way to tell, is to plug your phono deck into
    your stereo system's tape or CD input channels. If it sounds ok, then you
    probably don't need the pre-amp. If it sounds like crap or barely audible,
    and sounds fine on the normal phono input channels, then you do need the
    pre-amp to connect to the sound card. Nonetheless, you can always try it out
    first. It's unlikely that you will harm the sound card by trying.
    Thor, Oct 28, 2004
    #3
  4. ferret

    bmoag Guest

    It is more than the strength of the signal. LPs and 45s are recorded with
    the RIAA curve that changes the strength of bass/treble to minimize groove
    distortion. The correction for the RIAA curve is built into the standard
    preamp phono stage to get a normalized signal output. Also: if you are going
    to the trouble of recording your old vinyl why are you using what may be an
    ancient ceramic cartridge? You should make sure about the type of cartridge
    in your turntable. If you have a more modern magnetic coil cartridge (which
    is any medium grade or above cartridge manufactured in the last 30 years)
    you will definitely need a phono preamp and some very high grade cartridges
    require even further preamplification.
    bmoag, Oct 28, 2004
    #4
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