Sony translucent mirro vs Canon

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Ian, Apr 15, 2012.

  1. Ian

    Ian Guest

    Sony's translucent mirror DSLRs seem to have gained themselves a lot of
    publicity.
    I recently browsed a magazine's test review of a Sony DSLR with translucent
    mirror technology versus a Canon DSLR.

    It seems to be rarely pointed out that Canon had similar mirrors back in the
    1960s:
    - Pellix in 1965,
    - F-1 High Speed Motor Drive camera in 1972 offering 9 fps,
    - New F-1 High Speed Motor Drive camera in 1984 offering 14fps,
    - EOS RT in 1989 offering 5fps and a shutter lag of 8/1000 second,
    - EOS-1N RS in 1995 offering 10fps.

    I used an EOS RT and liked it a lot. Nice to hold and easy to use. My
    favourite subjects were waterfowl taking off and landing on a nearby pond.
    Very easy to track them though the viewfinder.The New F-1 High Speed Motor
    Drive camera wasn't exactly like a typical film SLR of that time. Clue -
    weight was 2.18kg.
    http://www.canon.com/camera-museum/...f1-hsmd.html?lang=us&categ=crn&page=1976-1985

    Canon aimed their translucent mirror bodies at the more expensive end of
    their SLR ranges (EOS RT being an exception). A challenge with their
    translucent mirrors was that (if I remember correctly) around 1/3 of the
    light coming through the lens went to the viewfinder instead of the film.

    Anyone else remember or use these bodies? Canon's name for the mirror was
    "pellicle".

    Regards, Ian.
    Ian, Apr 15, 2012
    #1
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  2. Ian

    Bruce Guest

    "Ian" <> wrote:
    >
    >Sony's translucent mirror DSLRs seem to have gained themselves a lot of
    >publicity.



    That publicity has unfortunately not been translated into sales.

    The Sony Alpha SLTs are more difficult to sell than any other
    DSLR/mirrorless interchangeable-lens bodies except the Sigma SD1.

    They also have a high return rate compared with DSLRs.
    Bruce, Apr 15, 2012
    #2
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  3. Ian

    Max Guest

    On 4/15/2012 12:32 PM, Ian wrote:
    > Sony's translucent mirror DSLRs seem to have gained themselves a lot of
    > publicity.
    > I recently browsed a magazine's test review of a Sony DSLR with translucent
    > mirror technology versus a Canon DSLR.
    >
    > It seems to be rarely pointed out that Canon had similar mirrors back in the
    > 1960s:
    > - Pellix in 1965,
    > - F-1 High Speed Motor Drive camera in 1972 offering 9 fps,
    > - New F-1 High Speed Motor Drive camera in 1984 offering 14fps,
    > - EOS RT in 1989 offering 5fps and a shutter lag of 8/1000 second,
    > - EOS-1N RS in 1995 offering 10fps.
    >
    > I used an EOS RT and liked it a lot. Nice to hold and easy to use. My
    > favourite subjects were waterfowl taking off and landing on a nearby pond.
    > Very easy to track them though the viewfinder.The New F-1 High Speed Motor
    > Drive camera wasn't exactly like a typical film SLR of that time. Clue -
    > weight was 2.18kg.
    > http://www.canon.com/camera-museum/...f1-hsmd.html?lang=us&categ=crn&page=1976-1985
    >
    > Canon aimed their translucent mirror bodies at the more expensive end of
    > their SLR ranges (EOS RT being an exception). A challenge with their
    > translucent mirrors was that (if I remember correctly) around 1/3 of the
    > light coming through the lens went to the viewfinder instead of the film.
    >
    > Anyone else remember or use these bodies? Canon's name for the mirror was
    > "pellicle".
    >
    > Regards, Ian.
    >
    >


    I took some pictures of Pellicles when we were in Florida...........

    Max
    Max, Apr 16, 2012
    #3
  4. Ian

    Joe Kotroczo Guest

    On 15/04/2012 23:42, Bruce wrote:
    > "Ian"<> wrote:
    >>
    >> Sony's translucent mirror DSLRs seem to have gained themselves a lot of
    >> publicity.

    >
    >
    > That publicity has unfortunately not been translated into sales.
    >
    > The Sony Alpha SLTs are more difficult to sell than any other
    > DSLR/mirrorless interchangeable-lens bodies except the Sigma SD1.
    >
    > They also have a high return rate compared with DSLRs.


    Why? I'm quite happy with my a77 so far.


    --
    Illegitimi non carborundum
    Joe Kotroczo, Apr 16, 2012
    #4
  5. Gary Eickmeier <> wrote:
    > "Rich" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Bruce <> wrote in
    >> news::
    >>> "Ian" <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>Sony's translucent mirror DSLRs seem to have gained themselves a lot of
    >>>>publicity.


    >>> That publicity has unfortunately not been translated into sales.
    >>>
    >>> The Sony Alpha SLTs are more difficult to sell than any other
    >>> DSLR/mirrorless interchangeable-lens bodies except the Sigma SD1.
    >>>
    >>> They also have a high return rate compared with DSLRs.

    >>
    >> Why do people return them? To switch to another brand?


    > Sounds like rubbish to me. I have been into Sony since the a100 was the
    > first DSLR to top 10 MP. The thing about the SLT design is that you are
    > looking at a live view image straight off the imaging chip. This means you
    > can focus tack sharp precisely by seeing what you are getting beforehand.
    > Slap happy mirrors are a thing of the past.


    I have Sony's 500mm f8 reflex lens. Not the sharpest of 500mm lenses,
    perhaps for reasons inherent in the catadioptric design, which might
    be why they've discontinued it. It has been suggested by some that due
    to the light weight and short length of long focal length reflex
    lenses compared to refractors that they're much more susceptible to
    mirror slap smearing.

    I've spent a lot of time on Sony DSLRs without mirror lock up finding
    ways of reducing the mirror slap image smearing at 500mm. The first
    thing I discovered was that it happened at much higher shutter speeds
    than the conventional wisdom suggested. The second thing I discovered
    was that it probably wasn't mirror slap I was seeing at 1/250th sec on
    two tripods (one for camera, one for lens) with my 500mm reflex, it
    was probably shutter slap. At 1/250th of a sec it was an image echo a
    few pixels vertically shifted. At lower shutter speeds it turned into
    a smear which started to spread out horizontally as well.

    I'm glad to see that the clattering clockwork mirrors are at last
    being consigned to the technological dustbin. But what about the
    clattering clockwork shutter?

    --
    Chris Malcolm
    Chris Malcolm, Apr 20, 2012
    #5
  6. Ian

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Alfred
    Molon <> wrote:

    > In article <>, Chris Malcolm says...
    > > it was probably shutter slap

    >
    > Why are there no DSLRs with electronic shutters?


    because a physical barrier is needed so the sensor can flush. however,
    canon has an electronic first curtain in live view.

    > I think one of the
    > early Nikon DSLRs (6MP?) had one, then they disappeared.


    they disappeared because they weren't very good and they weren't all
    electronic, but rather electro-mechanical. one problem was blooming.
    nospam, Apr 20, 2012
    #6
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