"Sony, Toppan Develop Optical Disc Made from Paper"

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Tarkus, Apr 18, 2004.

  1. Tarkus

    Tarkus Guest

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=581&e=1&u=/nm/20040416/tc_nm/tech_sony_toppan_dc

    Sony, Toppan Develop Optical Disc Made from Paper
    Fri Apr 16, 9:57 AM ET

    TOKYO (Reuters) - Japanese electronics conglomerate Sony Corp (news - web
    sites) and Toppan Printing Co Ltd have developed a new optical disc, made
    mostly from paper, that they say will be compatible with next-generation
    DVD technology.

    In a joint news release distributed late Thursday, the two companies said
    the new disc was comprised 51 percent of paper, enabling lower production
    costs.

    The disc can store up to five times more information than current discs,
    because it is based on blue-laser DVD technology.

    Blue-laser DVD players are expected to replace the current generation of
    red-laser DVD players in a few years' time.

    The paper disc is based on a version of a blue-laser DVD technology,
    called Blu-Ray, that is supported by a consortium of electronics makers
    including Sony, Matsushita Electric Industrial and Dutch firm Philips

    Toppan, the world's leading maker of color filters for liquid crystal
    displays, said the new discs could be more secure, since disposal of used
    discs can be done easily.

    The two companies said they planned to continue development of the disc
    for practical use.

    --
    "I'm sorry, Wendy, but I just don't trust anything that bleeds for five
    days and doesn't die."

    Now playing: the radio
     
    Tarkus, Apr 18, 2004
    #1
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  2. Tarkus

    Mark Spatny Guest

    Tarkus, says...
    > the new discs could be more secure, since disposal of used
    > discs can be done easily.


    Can somebody explain how the first and second halves of this sentence
    have any relationship to eachother? What does ease of disposal have to
    do with security?
     
    Mark Spatny, Apr 18, 2004
    #2
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  3. Tarkus

    Bob Bohling Guest

    I would guess that he means to be able and destroy sensitive data.

    "Mark Spatny" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Tarkus, says...
    > > the new discs could be more secure, since disposal of used
    > > discs can be done easily.

    >
    > Can somebody explain how the first and second halves of this sentence
    > have any relationship to eachother? What does ease of disposal have to
    > do with security?
     
    Bob Bohling, Apr 18, 2004
    #3
  4. Tarkus

    poldy Guest

    In article <>,
    Mark Spatny <> wrote:

    > Tarkus, says...
    > > the new discs could be more secure, since disposal of used
    > > discs can be done easily.

    >
    > Can somebody explain how the first and second halves of this sentence
    > have any relationship to eachother? What does ease of disposal have to
    > do with security?


    Your data will be more secure if it's easier to dispose of, is what
    they're trying to get at.

    I'm thinking this is more about making the discs cheaper to manufacture,
    not about security, as Blue Ray is in a race with HD DVD to become the
    favored format. So in that case, it'll be about cheaper to make video
    discs.
     
    poldy, Apr 18, 2004
    #4
  5. Tarkus

    Larry Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > Tarkus, says...
    > > the new discs could be more secure, since disposal of used
    > > discs can be done easily.

    >
    > Can somebody explain how the first and second halves of this sentence
    > have any relationship to eachother? What does ease of disposal have to
    > do with security?
    >


    Can anyone understand "Place this SCREENER in the shredder" when finished
    reviewing??

    --
    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
     
    Larry, Apr 19, 2004
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    Larry <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > says...
    > > Tarkus, says...
    > > > the new discs could be more secure, since disposal of used
    > > > discs can be done easily.

    > >
    > > Can somebody explain how the first and second halves of this sentence
    > > have any relationship to eachother? What does ease of disposal have to
    > > do with security?
    > >

    >
    > Can anyone understand "Place this SCREENER in the shredder" when finished
    > reviewing??



    And, it gives new meaning to the phrase "burning" a DVD.
     
    Paul Jepperson, Apr 19, 2004
    #6
  7. Tarkus

    Mark Spatny Guest

    Larry, says...
    > Can anyone understand "Place this SCREENER in the shredder" when finished
    > reviewing??


    Ahhh, now THAT I understand. Now it makes sense. I was thinking of
    security as in encryption or digital rights management, and I didn't see
    how disposability helped that. My mistake.
     
    Mark Spatny, Apr 21, 2004
    #7
  8. Tarkus

    Larry Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > Ahhh, now THAT I understand. Now it makes sense. I was thinking of
    > security as in encryption or digital rights management, and I didn't see
    > how disposability helped that. My mistake.
    >



    A little follow up!!!

    Two days ago as I walked through the local "Office Max" I notices they
    have new shredders that have a mechanism designed for CD/DVD discs (as well
    as for credit cards and paper).

    I have one that has a slot for credit cards, and another slot for
    paper, but this was the first one Ive seen with a third slot for cd/dvd.

    (cost was about $80 (US).

    --
    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
     
    Larry, Apr 21, 2004
    #8
  9. Tarkus

    poldy Guest

    In article <>,
    Larry <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > says...
    > > Ahhh, now THAT I understand. Now it makes sense. I was thinking of
    > > security as in encryption or digital rights management, and I didn't see
    > > how disposability helped that. My mistake.
    > >

    >
    >
    > A little follow up!!!
    >
    > Two days ago as I walked through the local "Office Max" I notices they
    > have new shredders that have a mechanism designed for CD/DVD discs (as well
    > as for credit cards and paper).
    >
    > I have one that has a slot for credit cards, and another slot for
    > paper, but this was the first one Ive seen with a third slot for cd/dvd.
    >
    > (cost was about $80 (US).


    I've seen one on Fresh Gear on Tech TV which could also shred discs.

    But personally, I wouldn't want to use one. The grinding action breaks
    down the plastic and data layer (made of foil-like substance for pressed
    discs and dye for writeable discs) and probably causes airborne
    particulates that you could ingest or breath in.

    And even if that wasn't the case, it would be better to recycle discs
    under a controlled process rather than to have consumers dump these
    shaved and shredded materials in the trash.
     
    poldy, Apr 21, 2004
    #9
  10. Tarkus

    Larry Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > I've seen one on Fresh Gear on Tech TV which could also shred discs.
    >
    > But personally, I wouldn't want to use one. The grinding action breaks
    > down the plastic and data layer (made of foil-like substance for pressed
    > discs and dye for writeable discs) and probably causes airborne
    > particulates that you could ingest or breath in.
    >
    > And even if that wasn't the case, it would be better to recycle discs
    > under a controlled process rather than to have consumers dump these
    > shaved and shredded materials in the trash.
    >


    Not a problem in my opinion (very little, if any material escapes from the
    unit I was looking at) all the paper/plastic trash in my area goes to an
    incinerator where it is turned into electricity.


    --
    Larry Lynch
    Mystic, Ct.
     
    Larry, Apr 23, 2004
    #10
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