Sony GPS tracker for photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by newcamz.blogspot.com, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. "Sony has today announced a very interesting little device for
    recording the position where photographs are taken. The GPS-CS1 is a
    small (9 cm / 3.5 in) cylindrical device which you simply attach to a
    backback or belt loop and carry with you while you shoot, it records
    your GPS location and this information can later be synchronized with
    your digital images to provide a map of where your photos were taken."

    http://www.dpreview.com/news/0608/06080202sonygpscs1.asp

    Cheers!
    http://newcamz.blogspot.com
    newcamz.blogspot.com, Aug 3, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 2 Aug 2006 22:07:24 -0700, newcamz.blogspot.com wrote:

    >"Sony has today announced a very interesting little device for
    >recording the position where photographs are taken. The GPS-CS1 is a
    >small (9 cm / 3.5 in) cylindrical device which you simply attach to a
    >backback or belt loop and carry with you while you shoot, it records
    >your GPS location and this information can later be synchronized with
    >your digital images to provide a map of where your photos were taken."
    >
    >http://www.dpreview.com/news/0608/06080202sonygpscs1.asp
    >
    >Cheers!
    >http://newcamz.blogspot.com


    My personal opinion is that I much prefer to use a multi-purpose
    GPS, which should fulfill the same purpose as good or better.

    I guess though, that, as well as I know Sony, their software
    will be locked down to work only with their own puny hardware.

    Hans-Georg

    --
    No mail, please.
    Hans-Georg Michna, Aug 3, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. newcamz.blogspot.com

    Ron Hunter Guest

    newcamz.blogspot.com wrote:
    > "Sony has today announced a very interesting little device for
    > recording the position where photographs are taken. The GPS-CS1 is a
    > small (9 cm / 3.5 in) cylindrical device which you simply attach to a
    > backback or belt loop and carry with you while you shoot, it records
    > your GPS location and this information can later be synchronized with
    > your digital images to provide a map of where your photos were taken."
    >
    > http://www.dpreview.com/news/0608/06080202sonygpscs1.asp
    >
    > Cheers!
    > http://newcamz.blogspot.com
    >


    Just about any GPS that allows downloading of track logs could be used
    for this purpose with a simple program to correlate the EXIF time data
    with the GPS track log data. No magic there, but an interesting
    application of it.
    Ron Hunter, Aug 3, 2006
    #3
  4. newcamz.blogspot.com

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Hans-Georg Michna wrote:
    > On 2 Aug 2006 22:07:24 -0700, newcamz.blogspot.com wrote:
    >
    >> "Sony has today announced a very interesting little device for
    >> recording the position where photographs are taken. The GPS-CS1 is a
    >> small (9 cm / 3.5 in) cylindrical device which you simply attach to a
    >> backback or belt loop and carry with you while you shoot, it records
    >> your GPS location and this information can later be synchronized with
    >> your digital images to provide a map of where your photos were taken."
    >>
    >> http://www.dpreview.com/news/0608/06080202sonygpscs1.asp
    >>
    >> Cheers!
    >> http://newcamz.blogspot.com

    >
    > My personal opinion is that I much prefer to use a multi-purpose
    > GPS, which should fulfill the same purpose as good or better.
    >
    > I guess though, that, as well as I know Sony, their software
    > will be locked down to work only with their own puny hardware.
    >
    > Hans-Georg
    >

    Which will sell for more than most general purpose GPS receivers with
    vastly greater utility, and flexibility.
    Ron Hunter, Aug 3, 2006
    #4
  5. newcamz.blogspot.com

    Hoshisato Guest

    newcamz.blogspot.com wrote:
    > "Sony has today announced a very interesting little device for
    > recording the position where photographs are taken. The GPS-CS1 is a
    > small (9 cm / 3.5 in) cylindrical device which you simply attach to a
    > backback or belt loop and carry with you while you shoot, it records
    > your GPS location and this information can later be synchronized with
    > your digital images to provide a map of where your photos were taken."
    >
    > http://www.dpreview.com/news/0608/06080202sonygpscs1.asp
    >
    > Cheers!
    > http://newcamz.blogspot.com


    I use my Garmin GPSMap 60C for that to great effect, maybe new for
    Sony, but otherwise nothing new under the sun. Now, if only my Pentax
    DSLR could register the position directly like some of the Nikon
    cameras can, that would be a great option :)
    Hoshisato, Aug 3, 2006
    #5
  6. On Thu, 03 Aug 2006 02:38:53 -0500, Ron Hunter <> wrote:
    > newcamz.blogspot.com wrote:
    >> "Sony has today announced a very interesting little device for
    >> recording the position where photographs are taken. The GPS-CS1 is a
    >> small (9 cm / 3.5 in) cylindrical device which you simply attach to a
    >> backback or belt loop and carry with you while you shoot, it records
    >> your GPS location and this information can later be synchronized with
    >> your digital images to provide a map of where your photos were taken."
    >>
    >> http://www.dpreview.com/news/0608/06080202sonygpscs1.asp

    >
    > Just about any GPS that allows downloading of track logs could be used
    > for this purpose with a simple program to correlate the EXIF time data
    > with the GPS track log data. No magic there, but an interesting
    > application of it.


    Has anyone written said 'simple program'? As you say, it should be
    fairly easy; I'm just wondering whether it's been done yet.

    The next question, of course, is when will we start to see this sort of
    functionality built-in to cameras. I believe that some of the pro-level
    DSLRs can take GPS add-on modules, but I'm a little surprised that
    nobody has tried to stick such a beast inside a compact body (with a
    nice $150 price premium, of course).

    -dms
    Daniel Silevitch, Aug 3, 2006
    #6
  7. newcamz.blogspot.com

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Hoshisato wrote:
    > newcamz.blogspot.com wrote:
    >> "Sony has today announced a very interesting little device for
    >> recording the position where photographs are taken. The GPS-CS1 is a
    >> small (9 cm / 3.5 in) cylindrical device which you simply attach to a
    >> backback or belt loop and carry with you while you shoot, it records
    >> your GPS location and this information can later be synchronized with
    >> your digital images to provide a map of where your photos were taken."
    >>
    >> http://www.dpreview.com/news/0608/06080202sonygpscs1.asp
    >>
    >> Cheers!
    >> http://newcamz.blogspot.com

    >
    > I use my Garmin GPSMap 60C for that to great effect, maybe new for
    > Sony, but otherwise nothing new under the sun. Now, if only my Pentax
    > DSLR could register the position directly like some of the Nikon
    > cameras can, that would be a great option :)
    >

    Would be most useful if it included a compass reading so you could
    determine the direction it was pointing as well. Rather nice for
    documenting a trip.
    Ron Hunter, Aug 3, 2006
    #7
  8. newcamz.blogspot.com

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Daniel Silevitch wrote:
    > On Thu, 03 Aug 2006 02:38:53 -0500, Ron Hunter <> wrote:
    >> newcamz.blogspot.com wrote:
    >>> "Sony has today announced a very interesting little device for
    >>> recording the position where photographs are taken. The GPS-CS1 is a
    >>> small (9 cm / 3.5 in) cylindrical device which you simply attach to a
    >>> backback or belt loop and carry with you while you shoot, it records
    >>> your GPS location and this information can later be synchronized with
    >>> your digital images to provide a map of where your photos were taken."
    >>>
    >>> http://www.dpreview.com/news/0608/06080202sonygpscs1.asp

    >> Just about any GPS that allows downloading of track logs could be used
    >> for this purpose with a simple program to correlate the EXIF time data
    >> with the GPS track log data. No magic there, but an interesting
    >> application of it.

    >
    > Has anyone written said 'simple program'? As you say, it should be
    > fairly easy; I'm just wondering whether it's been done yet.
    >
    > The next question, of course, is when will we start to see this sort of
    > functionality built-in to cameras. I believe that some of the pro-level
    > DSLRs can take GPS add-on modules, but I'm a little surprised that
    > nobody has tried to stick such a beast inside a compact body (with a
    > nice $150 price premium, of course).
    >
    > -dms


    I am not aware of any such program, but I have seen printouts from
    programs that do take track logs and plot them on a map, along with
    times. That feature exists in the Mapsend DirectRoute software. It
    would be a relatively simple job to match the times/positions to the
    EXIF data, manually.

    As for including it in a camera... They have them in some pretty small
    cellphones.
    Ron Hunter, Aug 3, 2006
    #8
  9. Yes, it has been done. Software to read a GPS track file and write GPS
    coordinates into photo EXIF headers is available as freeware or as
    commercial product.

    Two examples: Microsoft Research offers "Location Stamper" for free and it
    works very well. http://wwmx.org/Download.aspx

    I use Robogeo which has a very low cost -- it will even generate a Google
    Map web page with pushpin's for each of your photos.
    http://www.robogeo.com/home/



    "Daniel Silevitch" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >> Just about any GPS that allows downloading of track logs could be used
    >> for this purpose with a simple program to correlate the EXIF time data
    >> with the GPS track log data. No magic there, but an interesting
    >> application of it.

    >
    > Has anyone written said 'simple program'? As you say, it should be
    > fairly easy; I'm just wondering whether it's been done yet.
    Steve Chesney, Aug 3, 2006
    #9
  10. Daniel Silevitch <> writes:

    > On Thu, 03 Aug 2006 02:38:53 -0500, Ron Hunter <> wrote:
    > > newcamz.blogspot.com wrote:
    > >> "Sony has today announced a very interesting little device for
    > >> recording the position where photographs are taken. The GPS-CS1 is a
    > >> small (9 cm / 3.5 in) cylindrical device which you simply attach to a
    > >> backback or belt loop and carry with you while you shoot, it records
    > >> your GPS location and this information can later be synchronized with
    > >> your digital images to provide a map of where your photos were taken."
    > >>
    > >> http://www.dpreview.com/news/0608/06080202sonygpscs1.asp

    > >
    > > Just about any GPS that allows downloading of track logs could be used
    > > for this purpose with a simple program to correlate the EXIF time data
    > > with the GPS track log data. No magic there, but an interesting
    > > application of it.

    >
    > Has anyone written said 'simple program'? As you say, it should be
    > fairly easy; I'm just wondering whether it's been done yet.


    Here is one whose link I saved a few years ago (I don't own a GPS, so I have no
    idea how well it works):
    http://oziphototool.alistairdickie.com/

    > The next question, of course, is when will we start to see this sort of
    > functionality built-in to cameras. I believe that some of the pro-level
    > DSLRs can take GPS add-on modules, but I'm a little surprised that
    > nobody has tried to stick such a beast inside a compact body (with a
    > nice $150 price premium, of course).


    Kodak used to do it. High Nikons have support for adding a serial cable to
    talk to most of the GPSs.

    --
    Michael Meissner
    email:
    http://www.the-meissners.org
    Michael Meissner, Aug 5, 2006
    #10
  11. On Thu, 3 Aug 2006 15:56:20 -0500, Steve Chesney wrote:

    >Yes, it has been done. Software to read a GPS track file and write GPS
    >coordinates into photo EXIF headers is available as freeware or as
    >commercial product.
    >
    >Two examples: Microsoft Research offers "Location Stamper" for free and it
    >works very well. http://wwmx.org/Download.aspx
    >
    >I use Robogeo which has a very low cost -- it will even generate a Google
    >Map web page with pushpin's for each of your photos.
    >http://www.robogeo.com/home/


    Steve,

    why do you prefer robogeo over WWMX?

    In any case, it seems like an interesting idea to combine maps,
    satellite maps, GPS coordinates and photos into a travelogue.

    Must remember to take at least one photo per hour while I
    travel. Currently I take them in bursts with long intervals in
    between.

    Hans-Georg

    --
    No mail, please.
    Hans-Georg Michna, Aug 6, 2006
    #11
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Frisbee®
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,081
    J Figueredo
    Aug 19, 2006
  2. Mini GPS tracker

    , Dec 30, 2007, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    399
  3. Amjad
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    515
    Amjad
    Jan 24, 2008
  4. Amjad

    GPS JP430 - A New Technology in GPS System

    Amjad, Jan 25, 2008, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    519
    Amjad
    Jan 25, 2008
  5. Giuen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    875
    Giuen
    Sep 12, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page