Sony DSC-H5 or Fuji S9000?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by BRH, Jul 15, 2006.

  1. BRH

    BRH Guest

    Having used a Nikon Coolpix 950 for the past 5 years or so, I'm ready to
    step up to a more modern digital camera.

    I had previously posted a question about D-SLR's because I was
    interested in a camera with high zoom capabilities, and thought that
    adding lenses, etc would be a good feature.

    However, after doing a bit of research, I see that there are a number of
    "near-SLR" digital cameras with good zoom capabilities that would be a
    bit simpler to operate and would probably better meet my needs (mostly
    travel and nature photography with a little sports photography thrown in).

    So now, I'm trying to decide between the following cameras -- Sony
    DSC-H5 and Fuji S9000. Both get generally good reviews from both
    customers and website reviews. I like the manual zooming (twist the
    lens barrel) on the Fuji, as well as the fact I could re-use my existing
    CF cards with it. But I also REALLY like the very large LCD on the Sony
    and the option to add a number of lens extensions, etc. The range of
    the Fuji lens is slightly more versatile on the wide-angle end of the
    range, while the Sony can zoom in more closely on the subject. I'm not
    sure whether the lack of true image-stabilization on the Fuji is that
    big a drawback or not.

    If you're still reading this, I'd appreciate feedback on the relative
    merits of these two cameras (and I'm still open to any other similar
    models that someone might recommend).

    I'd say that I'm an intermediate-level amateur photographer with an
    interest in learning how to use the advanced features of these cameras.

    Thanks!
     
    BRH, Jul 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. BRH

    Guest

    BRH wrote:
    > ... after doing a bit of research, I see that there are a number of
    > "near-SLR" digital cameras with good zoom capabilities that would be a
    > bit simpler to operate and would probably better meet my needs (mostly
    > travel and nature photography with a little sports photography thrown in).


    While I do a bit of high end stuff with DSLR's and mf, I'm like you and
    just carry a prosumer when i 'go places'.. The only things I really
    miss are fast AF, and the ability to use high ISO's without suffering
    noise.

    > So now, I'm trying to decide between the following cameras -- Sony
    > DSC-H5 and Fuji S9000. Both get generally good reviews from both
    > customers and website reviews. I like the manual zooming (twist the
    > lens barrel) on the Fuji, as well as the fact I could re-use my existing
    > CF cards with it.


    Seem to be good choices, although I would probably throw in the
    Panasonic FZ30 as a contender if the slightly lower resolution/
    slightly higher noise are not issues. It has the best lens in class, I
    think..

    > But I also REALLY like the very large LCD on the Sony
    > and the option to add a number of lens extensions, etc.


    Yes, big LCD's are nice.. You *can* also add-on lenses (carefully) to
    the Fuji - it has a 58mm filter thread. Note that add-ons for these
    sort of lenses are often big and heavy, so they may need support.
    Thankfully the Fuji has a mechanical zoom, so at least you won't be
    loading up an electric motor if you unwisely decide to zoom...

    > The range of the Fuji lens is slightly more versatile on the wide-angle end


    To me, that is a very good thing - wide angle converters are a pain in
    the neck, and almost always introduce nasty quality issues. About the
    only decent one I've found is the Olympus 0.7x - it's big, heavy and
    has very good, if not great, optical quality.

    > I'm not
    > sure whether the lack of true image-stabilization on the Fuji is that
    > big a drawback or not.


    If you are going to shoot a lot of stuff at the tele end, and don't
    want to lug a tripod, then yes, it is a big drawback.

    > If you're still reading this, I'd appreciate feedback on the relative
    > merits of these two cameras (and I'm still open to any other similar
    > models that someone might recommend).


    If it's any help, I currently own an Olympus C8080 for this side of my
    photography. But every now and then I hanker for just a tiny bit more
    lens range, and bit extra resolution and enlargability.. My very close
    examination of samples from the Fuji indicate it has a small but
    significant edge over my Oly's 8Mp images, and the nature of the Fuji
    images is such that they sharpen exceptionally well, with minimal
    haloing - they are very 'DSLR' like. See:
    http://www.neocamera.com/review_fuji_s9000_crops3.html
    (comparison of 20D (!) to S9000 - try sharpening the Fuji side and try
    to spot the difference..)

    >From imaging-resource.. "..the S9000's default sharpening only extends

    about a pixel from the edge on the light side of the tone curve, a good
    level, not producing excessive artifacts in the images. (This is why
    the S9000's images take unsharp masking on the computer as well as they
    do.) While not shown here, the S9000's low sharpening setting pretty
    completely removes all sharpening artifacts, making images shot in that
    mode particularly well suited for post-capture sharpening on the
    computer. Very nice..."
    The imaging-resource Imatest results are also very interesting,
    indicating that the Fuji does manage to outperform 8Mp DSLR's in terms
    of resolution. Yes, I know that isn't all the story, but given the
    Fuji chip gives very good low-noise performance, and that it's dynamic
    range is also at the top of the heap... One problem with the Fuji -
    raw shooting is slow, and the supplied raw software support is poor
    (although there are good, and free, third party solutions). Sony has
    no raw, strangely..

    And I also like the idea of having 300mm instead of my Oly's 140mm.
    Being from the old school, I always lug a big tripod, or at least have
    my trusty beanbag.. so IS isn't a deal breaker for me. So I'm
    currently thinking about moving to the Fuji. The olympus is a fine
    camera, but I really like the look and colour of the Fuji images.

    Note that the Fuji has only a simple hotshoe, but the H5 has no hotshoe
    at all.

    Hope that helps in a small way.. As you can see, I'm leaning in a Fuji
    direction, but everyone is different. (O:
     
    , Jul 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. BRH

    SJ Guest

    BRH, exact dilemma I'm in. I could get any D slr, but don't like the bulk,
    changing lenses, etc. Right now I have an Olympus 5050, and 5mp is not the
    problem, the lack of quality zoom is. Let me know if you hear any more on
    the Fuji or other "near slr" cameras or if you know of any other forums I
    could get feedback, thanks
    Scott

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    BRH wrote:
    > ... after doing a bit of research, I see that there are a number of
    > "near-SLR" digital cameras with good zoom capabilities that would be a
    > bit simpler to operate and would probably better meet my needs (mostly
    > travel and nature photography with a little sports photography thrown in).


    While I do a bit of high end stuff with DSLR's and mf, I'm like you and
    just carry a prosumer when i 'go places'.. The only things I really
    miss are fast AF, and the ability to use high ISO's without suffering
    noise.

    > So now, I'm trying to decide between the following cameras -- Sony
    > DSC-H5 and Fuji S9000. Both get generally good reviews from both
    > customers and website reviews. I like the manual zooming (twist the
    > lens barrel) on the Fuji, as well as the fact I could re-use my existing
    > CF cards with it.


    Seem to be good choices, although I would probably throw in the
    Panasonic FZ30 as a contender if the slightly lower resolution/
    slightly higher noise are not issues. It has the best lens in class, I
    think..

    > But I also REALLY like the very large LCD on the Sony
    > and the option to add a number of lens extensions, etc.


    Yes, big LCD's are nice.. You *can* also add-on lenses (carefully) to
    the Fuji - it has a 58mm filter thread. Note that add-ons for these
    sort of lenses are often big and heavy, so they may need support.
    Thankfully the Fuji has a mechanical zoom, so at least you won't be
    loading up an electric motor if you unwisely decide to zoom...

    > The range of the Fuji lens is slightly more versatile on the wide-angle

    end

    To me, that is a very good thing - wide angle converters are a pain in
    the neck, and almost always introduce nasty quality issues. About the
    only decent one I've found is the Olympus 0.7x - it's big, heavy and
    has very good, if not great, optical quality.

    > I'm not
    > sure whether the lack of true image-stabilization on the Fuji is that
    > big a drawback or not.


    If you are going to shoot a lot of stuff at the tele end, and don't
    want to lug a tripod, then yes, it is a big drawback.

    > If you're still reading this, I'd appreciate feedback on the relative
    > merits of these two cameras (and I'm still open to any other similar
    > models that someone might recommend).


    If it's any help, I currently own an Olympus C8080 for this side of my
    photography. But every now and then I hanker for just a tiny bit more
    lens range, and bit extra resolution and enlargability.. My very close
    examination of samples from the Fuji indicate it has a small but
    significant edge over my Oly's 8Mp images, and the nature of the Fuji
    images is such that they sharpen exceptionally well, with minimal
    haloing - they are very 'DSLR' like. See:
    http://www.neocamera.com/review_fuji_s9000_crops3.html
    (comparison of 20D (!) to S9000 - try sharpening the Fuji side and try
    to spot the difference..)

    >From imaging-resource.. "..the S9000's default sharpening only extends

    about a pixel from the edge on the light side of the tone curve, a good
    level, not producing excessive artifacts in the images. (This is why
    the S9000's images take unsharp masking on the computer as well as they
    do.) While not shown here, the S9000's low sharpening setting pretty
    completely removes all sharpening artifacts, making images shot in that
    mode particularly well suited for post-capture sharpening on the
    computer. Very nice..."
    The imaging-resource Imatest results are also very interesting,
    indicating that the Fuji does manage to outperform 8Mp DSLR's in terms
    of resolution. Yes, I know that isn't all the story, but given the
    Fuji chip gives very good low-noise performance, and that it's dynamic
    range is also at the top of the heap... One problem with the Fuji -
    raw shooting is slow, and the supplied raw software support is poor
    (although there are good, and free, third party solutions). Sony has
    no raw, strangely..

    And I also like the idea of having 300mm instead of my Oly's 140mm.
    Being from the old school, I always lug a big tripod, or at least have
    my trusty beanbag.. so IS isn't a deal breaker for me. So I'm
    currently thinking about moving to the Fuji. The olympus is a fine
    camera, but I really like the look and colour of the Fuji images.

    Note that the Fuji has only a simple hotshoe, but the H5 has no hotshoe
    at all.

    Hope that helps in a small way.. As you can see, I'm leaning in a Fuji
    direction, but everyone is different. (O:
     
    SJ, Jul 16, 2006
    #3
  4. BRH

    BRH Guest

    SJ -- I just returned from my local Circuit City to see some of these
    cameras for myself. Here's what I found --

    Sony DSC-H5 just wasn't comfortable in my hands. It was a bit small and
    I especially didn't like the rocker controls (nor the location of them)
    for the zoom. The LCD was real nice, but if the controls aren't
    comfortable, that's the end of the story.

    Panasonic (can't recall whether it was the FZ7 or FZ30 that I looked at
    ----sorry). Lots of nice features, comfortable in my hands, but the LCD
    resolution was quite poor. It also uses a proprietary battery (I prefer
    AA's), but that's something that I could live with. I may go to another
    CC store to take another look at this one -- perhaps the LCD on the
    floor model at the first store was defective.....

    Fuji -- CC didn't carry these.

    In terms of other forums, I always looks at epinions.com before making
    major purchases. Nothing but customer reviews, which I find to be very
    helpful. Circuit City's webpage also has customer reviews of products
    they carry. So does Amazon.com.



    SJ wrote:
    > BRH, exact dilemma I'm in. I could get any D slr, but don't like the bulk,
    > changing lenses, etc. Right now I have an Olympus 5050, and 5mp is not the
    > problem, the lack of quality zoom is. Let me know if you hear any more on
    > the Fuji or other "near slr" cameras or if you know of any other forums I
    > could get feedback, thanks
    > Scott
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > BRH wrote:
    >
    >>... after doing a bit of research, I see that there are a number of
    >>"near-SLR" digital cameras with good zoom capabilities that would be a
    >>bit simpler to operate and would probably better meet my needs (mostly
    >>travel and nature photography with a little sports photography thrown in).

    >
    >
    > While I do a bit of high end stuff with DSLR's and mf, I'm like you and
    > just carry a prosumer when i 'go places'.. The only things I really
    > miss are fast AF, and the ability to use high ISO's without suffering
    > noise.
    >
    >
    >>So now, I'm trying to decide between the following cameras -- Sony
    >>DSC-H5 and Fuji S9000. Both get generally good reviews from both
    >>customers and website reviews. I like the manual zooming (twist the
    >>lens barrel) on the Fuji, as well as the fact I could re-use my existing
    >>CF cards with it.

    >
    >
    > Seem to be good choices, although I would probably throw in the
    > Panasonic FZ30 as a contender if the slightly lower resolution/
    > slightly higher noise are not issues. It has the best lens in class, I
    > think..
    >
    >
    >> But I also REALLY like the very large LCD on the Sony
    >>and the option to add a number of lens extensions, etc.

    >
    >
    > Yes, big LCD's are nice.. You *can* also add-on lenses (carefully) to
    > the Fuji - it has a 58mm filter thread. Note that add-ons for these
    > sort of lenses are often big and heavy, so they may need support.
    > Thankfully the Fuji has a mechanical zoom, so at least you won't be
    > loading up an electric motor if you unwisely decide to zoom...
    >
    >
    >>The range of the Fuji lens is slightly more versatile on the wide-angle

    >
    > end
    >
    > To me, that is a very good thing - wide angle converters are a pain in
    > the neck, and almost always introduce nasty quality issues. About the
    > only decent one I've found is the Olympus 0.7x - it's big, heavy and
    > has very good, if not great, optical quality.
    >
    >
    >>I'm not
    >>sure whether the lack of true image-stabilization on the Fuji is that
    >>big a drawback or not.

    >
    >
    > If you are going to shoot a lot of stuff at the tele end, and don't
    > want to lug a tripod, then yes, it is a big drawback.
    >
    >
    >>If you're still reading this, I'd appreciate feedback on the relative
    >>merits of these two cameras (and I'm still open to any other similar
    >>models that someone might recommend).

    >
    >
    > If it's any help, I currently own an Olympus C8080 for this side of my
    > photography. But every now and then I hanker for just a tiny bit more
    > lens range, and bit extra resolution and enlargability.. My very close
    > examination of samples from the Fuji indicate it has a small but
    > significant edge over my Oly's 8Mp images, and the nature of the Fuji
    > images is such that they sharpen exceptionally well, with minimal
    > haloing - they are very 'DSLR' like. See:
    > http://www.neocamera.com/review_fuji_s9000_crops3.html
    > (comparison of 20D (!) to S9000 - try sharpening the Fuji side and try
    > to spot the difference..)
    >
    >>From imaging-resource.. "..the S9000's default sharpening only extends

    > about a pixel from the edge on the light side of the tone curve, a good
    > level, not producing excessive artifacts in the images. (This is why
    > the S9000's images take unsharp masking on the computer as well as they
    > do.) While not shown here, the S9000's low sharpening setting pretty
    > completely removes all sharpening artifacts, making images shot in that
    > mode particularly well suited for post-capture sharpening on the
    > computer. Very nice..."
    > The imaging-resource Imatest results are also very interesting,
    > indicating that the Fuji does manage to outperform 8Mp DSLR's in terms
    > of resolution. Yes, I know that isn't all the story, but given the
    > Fuji chip gives very good low-noise performance, and that it's dynamic
    > range is also at the top of the heap... One problem with the Fuji -
    > raw shooting is slow, and the supplied raw software support is poor
    > (although there are good, and free, third party solutions). Sony has
    > no raw, strangely..
    >
    > And I also like the idea of having 300mm instead of my Oly's 140mm.
    > Being from the old school, I always lug a big tripod, or at least have
    > my trusty beanbag.. so IS isn't a deal breaker for me. So I'm
    > currently thinking about moving to the Fuji. The olympus is a fine
    > camera, but I really like the look and colour of the Fuji images.
    >
    > Note that the Fuji has only a simple hotshoe, but the H5 has no hotshoe
    > at all.
    >
    > Hope that helps in a small way.. As you can see, I'm leaning in a Fuji
    > direction, but everyone is different. (O:
    >
    >
    >
     
    BRH, Jul 16, 2006
    #4
  5. BRH

    BRH Guest

    FYI -- I went back to CC to play around with the FZ7 a bit more. It
    turned out that the exposure setting was at +2.0, and the screen
    brightness setting (a separate control) was also turned way up. No
    wonder the LCD screen looked so washed out. After adjusting the
    settings it looked fine.



    BRH wrote:
    >
    >
    > SJ -- I just returned from my local Circuit City to see some of these
    > cameras for myself. Here's what I found --
    >
    > Sony DSC-H5 just wasn't comfortable in my hands. It was a bit small and
    > I especially didn't like the rocker controls (nor the location of them)
    > for the zoom. The LCD was real nice, but if the controls aren't
    > comfortable, that's the end of the story.
    >
    > Panasonic (can't recall whether it was the FZ7 or FZ30 that I looked at
    > ----sorry). Lots of nice features, comfortable in my hands, but the LCD
    > resolution was quite poor. It also uses a proprietary battery (I prefer
    > AA's), but that's something that I could live with. I may go to another
    > CC store to take another look at this one -- perhaps the LCD on the
    > floor model at the first store was defective.....
    >
    > Fuji -- CC didn't carry these.
    >
    > In terms of other forums, I always looks at epinions.com before making
    > major purchases. Nothing but customer reviews, which I find to be very
    > helpful. Circuit City's webpage also has customer reviews of products
    > they carry. So does Amazon.com.
    >
    >
    >
    > SJ wrote:
    >
    >> BRH, exact dilemma I'm in. I could get any D slr, but don't like the
    >> bulk,
    >> changing lenses, etc. Right now I have an Olympus 5050, and 5mp is
    >> not the
    >> problem, the lack of quality zoom is. Let me know if you hear any
    >> more on
    >> the Fuji or other "near slr" cameras or if you know of any other forums I
    >> could get feedback, thanks
    >> Scott
    >>
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> BRH wrote:
    >>
    >>> ... after doing a bit of research, I see that there are a number of
    >>> "near-SLR" digital cameras with good zoom capabilities that would be a
    >>> bit simpler to operate and would probably better meet my needs (mostly
    >>> travel and nature photography with a little sports photography thrown
    >>> in).

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> While I do a bit of high end stuff with DSLR's and mf, I'm like you and
    >> just carry a prosumer when i 'go places'.. The only things I really
    >> miss are fast AF, and the ability to use high ISO's without suffering
    >> noise.
    >>
    >>
    >>> So now, I'm trying to decide between the following cameras -- Sony
    >>> DSC-H5 and Fuji S9000. Both get generally good reviews from both
    >>> customers and website reviews. I like the manual zooming (twist the
    >>> lens barrel) on the Fuji, as well as the fact I could re-use my existing
    >>> CF cards with it.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Seem to be good choices, although I would probably throw in the
    >> Panasonic FZ30 as a contender if the slightly lower resolution/
    >> slightly higher noise are not issues. It has the best lens in class, I
    >> think..
    >>
    >>
    >>> But I also REALLY like the very large LCD on the Sony
    >>> and the option to add a number of lens extensions, etc.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Yes, big LCD's are nice.. You *can* also add-on lenses (carefully) to
    >> the Fuji - it has a 58mm filter thread. Note that add-ons for these
    >> sort of lenses are often big and heavy, so they may need support.
    >> Thankfully the Fuji has a mechanical zoom, so at least you won't be
    >> loading up an electric motor if you unwisely decide to zoom...
    >>
    >>
    >>> The range of the Fuji lens is slightly more versatile on the wide-angle

    >>
    >>
    >> end
    >>
    >> To me, that is a very good thing - wide angle converters are a pain in
    >> the neck, and almost always introduce nasty quality issues. About the
    >> only decent one I've found is the Olympus 0.7x - it's big, heavy and
    >> has very good, if not great, optical quality.
    >>
    >>
    >>> I'm not
    >>> sure whether the lack of true image-stabilization on the Fuji is that
    >>> big a drawback or not.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> If you are going to shoot a lot of stuff at the tele end, and don't
    >> want to lug a tripod, then yes, it is a big drawback.
    >>
    >>
    >>> If you're still reading this, I'd appreciate feedback on the relative
    >>> merits of these two cameras (and I'm still open to any other similar
    >>> models that someone might recommend).

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> If it's any help, I currently own an Olympus C8080 for this side of my
    >> photography. But every now and then I hanker for just a tiny bit more
    >> lens range, and bit extra resolution and enlargability.. My very close
    >> examination of samples from the Fuji indicate it has a small but
    >> significant edge over my Oly's 8Mp images, and the nature of the Fuji
    >> images is such that they sharpen exceptionally well, with minimal
    >> haloing - they are very 'DSLR' like. See:
    >> http://www.neocamera.com/review_fuji_s9000_crops3.html
    >> (comparison of 20D (!) to S9000 - try sharpening the Fuji side and try
    >> to spot the difference..)
    >>
    >>> From imaging-resource.. "..the S9000's default sharpening only extends

    >>
    >> about a pixel from the edge on the light side of the tone curve, a good
    >> level, not producing excessive artifacts in the images. (This is why
    >> the S9000's images take unsharp masking on the computer as well as they
    >> do.) While not shown here, the S9000's low sharpening setting pretty
    >> completely removes all sharpening artifacts, making images shot in that
    >> mode particularly well suited for post-capture sharpening on the
    >> computer. Very nice..."
    >> The imaging-resource Imatest results are also very interesting,
    >> indicating that the Fuji does manage to outperform 8Mp DSLR's in terms
    >> of resolution. Yes, I know that isn't all the story, but given the
    >> Fuji chip gives very good low-noise performance, and that it's dynamic
    >> range is also at the top of the heap... One problem with the Fuji -
    >> raw shooting is slow, and the supplied raw software support is poor
    >> (although there are good, and free, third party solutions). Sony has
    >> no raw, strangely..
    >>
    >> And I also like the idea of having 300mm instead of my Oly's 140mm.
    >> Being from the old school, I always lug a big tripod, or at least have
    >> my trusty beanbag.. so IS isn't a deal breaker for me. So I'm
    >> currently thinking about moving to the Fuji. The olympus is a fine
    >> camera, but I really like the look and colour of the Fuji images.
    >>
    >> Note that the Fuji has only a simple hotshoe, but the H5 has no hotshoe
    >> at all.
    >>
    >> Hope that helps in a small way.. As you can see, I'm leaning in a Fuji
    >> direction, but everyone is different. (O:
    >>
    >>
    >>
     
    BRH, Jul 17, 2006
    #5
  6. BRH

    SJ Guest

    Thanks for the info BRH, I hear the Panasonic FZ30 is nice too. Did you
    happen to see that?



    <BRH> wrote in message news:...
    FYI -- I went back to CC to play around with the FZ7 a bit more. It
    turned out that the exposure setting was at +2.0, and the screen
    brightness setting (a separate control) was also turned way up. No
    wonder the LCD screen looked so washed out. After adjusting the
    settings it looked fine.



    BRH wrote:
    >
    >
    > SJ -- I just returned from my local Circuit City to see some of these
    > cameras for myself. Here's what I found --
    >
    > Sony DSC-H5 just wasn't comfortable in my hands. It was a bit small and
    > I especially didn't like the rocker controls (nor the location of them)
    > for the zoom. The LCD was real nice, but if the controls aren't
    > comfortable, that's the end of the story.
    >
    > Panasonic (can't recall whether it was the FZ7 or FZ30 that I looked at
    > ----sorry). Lots of nice features, comfortable in my hands, but the LCD
    > resolution was quite poor. It also uses a proprietary battery (I prefer
    > AA's), but that's something that I could live with. I may go to another
    > CC store to take another look at this one -- perhaps the LCD on the
    > floor model at the first store was defective.....
    >
    > Fuji -- CC didn't carry these.
    >
    > In terms of other forums, I always looks at epinions.com before making
    > major purchases. Nothing but customer reviews, which I find to be very
    > helpful. Circuit City's webpage also has customer reviews of products
    > they carry. So does Amazon.com.
    >
    >
    >
    > SJ wrote:
    >
    >> BRH, exact dilemma I'm in. I could get any D slr, but don't like the
    >> bulk,
    >> changing lenses, etc. Right now I have an Olympus 5050, and 5mp is
    >> not the
    >> problem, the lack of quality zoom is. Let me know if you hear any
    >> more on
    >> the Fuji or other "near slr" cameras or if you know of any other forums I
    >> could get feedback, thanks
    >> Scott
    >>
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> BRH wrote:
    >>
    >>> ... after doing a bit of research, I see that there are a number of
    >>> "near-SLR" digital cameras with good zoom capabilities that would be a
    >>> bit simpler to operate and would probably better meet my needs (mostly
    >>> travel and nature photography with a little sports photography thrown
    >>> in).

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> While I do a bit of high end stuff with DSLR's and mf, I'm like you and
    >> just carry a prosumer when i 'go places'.. The only things I really
    >> miss are fast AF, and the ability to use high ISO's without suffering
    >> noise.
    >>
    >>
    >>> So now, I'm trying to decide between the following cameras -- Sony
    >>> DSC-H5 and Fuji S9000. Both get generally good reviews from both
    >>> customers and website reviews. I like the manual zooming (twist the
    >>> lens barrel) on the Fuji, as well as the fact I could re-use my existing
    >>> CF cards with it.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Seem to be good choices, although I would probably throw in the
    >> Panasonic FZ30 as a contender if the slightly lower resolution/
    >> slightly higher noise are not issues. It has the best lens in class, I
    >> think..
    >>
    >>
    >>> But I also REALLY like the very large LCD on the Sony
    >>> and the option to add a number of lens extensions, etc.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Yes, big LCD's are nice.. You *can* also add-on lenses (carefully) to
    >> the Fuji - it has a 58mm filter thread. Note that add-ons for these
    >> sort of lenses are often big and heavy, so they may need support.
    >> Thankfully the Fuji has a mechanical zoom, so at least you won't be
    >> loading up an electric motor if you unwisely decide to zoom...
    >>
    >>
    >>> The range of the Fuji lens is slightly more versatile on the wide-angle

    >>
    >>
    >> end
    >>
    >> To me, that is a very good thing - wide angle converters are a pain in
    >> the neck, and almost always introduce nasty quality issues. About the
    >> only decent one I've found is the Olympus 0.7x - it's big, heavy and
    >> has very good, if not great, optical quality.
    >>
    >>
    >>> I'm not
    >>> sure whether the lack of true image-stabilization on the Fuji is that
    >>> big a drawback or not.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> If you are going to shoot a lot of stuff at the tele end, and don't
    >> want to lug a tripod, then yes, it is a big drawback.
    >>
    >>
    >>> If you're still reading this, I'd appreciate feedback on the relative
    >>> merits of these two cameras (and I'm still open to any other similar
    >>> models that someone might recommend).

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> If it's any help, I currently own an Olympus C8080 for this side of my
    >> photography. But every now and then I hanker for just a tiny bit more
    >> lens range, and bit extra resolution and enlargability.. My very close
    >> examination of samples from the Fuji indicate it has a small but
    >> significant edge over my Oly's 8Mp images, and the nature of the Fuji
    >> images is such that they sharpen exceptionally well, with minimal
    >> haloing - they are very 'DSLR' like. See:
    >> http://www.neocamera.com/review_fuji_s9000_crops3.html
    >> (comparison of 20D (!) to S9000 - try sharpening the Fuji side and try
    >> to spot the difference..)
    >>
    >>> From imaging-resource.. "..the S9000's default sharpening only extends

    >>
    >> about a pixel from the edge on the light side of the tone curve, a good
    >> level, not producing excessive artifacts in the images. (This is why
    >> the S9000's images take unsharp masking on the computer as well as they
    >> do.) While not shown here, the S9000's low sharpening setting pretty
    >> completely removes all sharpening artifacts, making images shot in that
    >> mode particularly well suited for post-capture sharpening on the
    >> computer. Very nice..."
    >> The imaging-resource Imatest results are also very interesting,
    >> indicating that the Fuji does manage to outperform 8Mp DSLR's in terms
    >> of resolution. Yes, I know that isn't all the story, but given the
    >> Fuji chip gives very good low-noise performance, and that it's dynamic
    >> range is also at the top of the heap... One problem with the Fuji -
    >> raw shooting is slow, and the supplied raw software support is poor
    >> (although there are good, and free, third party solutions). Sony has
    >> no raw, strangely..
    >>
    >> And I also like the idea of having 300mm instead of my Oly's 140mm.
    >> Being from the old school, I always lug a big tripod, or at least have
    >> my trusty beanbag.. so IS isn't a deal breaker for me. So I'm
    >> currently thinking about moving to the Fuji. The olympus is a fine
    >> camera, but I really like the look and colour of the Fuji images.
    >>
    >> Note that the Fuji has only a simple hotshoe, but the H5 has no hotshoe
    >> at all.
    >>
    >> Hope that helps in a small way.. As you can see, I'm leaning in a Fuji
    >> direction, but everyone is different. (O:
    >>
    >>
    >>
     
    SJ, Jul 17, 2006
    #6
  7. BRH

    BRH Guest

    No -- Unfortunately CC Stores don't carry it (although they do offer it
    on their website).

    SJ wrote:

    > Thanks for the info BRH, I hear the Panasonic FZ30 is nice too. Did you
    > happen to see that?
    >
    >
    >
    > <BRH> wrote in message news:...
    > FYI -- I went back to CC to play around with the FZ7 a bit more. It
    > turned out that the exposure setting was at +2.0, and the screen
    > brightness setting (a separate control) was also turned way up. No
    > wonder the LCD screen looked so washed out. After adjusting the
    > settings it looked fine.
    >
    >
    >
    > BRH wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>SJ -- I just returned from my local Circuit City to see some of these
    >>cameras for myself. Here's what I found --
    >>
    >>Sony DSC-H5 just wasn't comfortable in my hands. It was a bit small and
    >>I especially didn't like the rocker controls (nor the location of them)
    >>for the zoom. The LCD was real nice, but if the controls aren't
    >>comfortable, that's the end of the story.
    >>
    >>Panasonic (can't recall whether it was the FZ7 or FZ30 that I looked at
    >>----sorry). Lots of nice features, comfortable in my hands, but the LCD
    >>resolution was quite poor. It also uses a proprietary battery (I prefer
    >>AA's), but that's something that I could live with. I may go to another
    >>CC store to take another look at this one -- perhaps the LCD on the
    >>floor model at the first store was defective.....
    >>
    >>Fuji -- CC didn't carry these.
    >>
    >>In terms of other forums, I always looks at epinions.com before making
    >>major purchases. Nothing but customer reviews, which I find to be very
    >>helpful. Circuit City's webpage also has customer reviews of products
    >>they carry. So does Amazon.com.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>SJ wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>BRH, exact dilemma I'm in. I could get any D slr, but don't like the
    >>>bulk,
    >>>changing lenses, etc. Right now I have an Olympus 5050, and 5mp is
    >>>not the
    >>>problem, the lack of quality zoom is. Let me know if you hear any
    >>>more on
    >>>the Fuji or other "near slr" cameras or if you know of any other forums I
    >>>could get feedback, thanks
    >>>Scott
    >>>
    >>><> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>BRH wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>... after doing a bit of research, I see that there are a number of
    >>>>"near-SLR" digital cameras with good zoom capabilities that would be a
    >>>>bit simpler to operate and would probably better meet my needs (mostly
    >>>>travel and nature photography with a little sports photography thrown
    >>>>in).
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>While I do a bit of high end stuff with DSLR's and mf, I'm like you and
    >>>just carry a prosumer when i 'go places'.. The only things I really
    >>>miss are fast AF, and the ability to use high ISO's without suffering
    >>>noise.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>So now, I'm trying to decide between the following cameras -- Sony
    >>>>DSC-H5 and Fuji S9000. Both get generally good reviews from both
    >>>>customers and website reviews. I like the manual zooming (twist the
    >>>>lens barrel) on the Fuji, as well as the fact I could re-use my existing
    >>>>CF cards with it.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Seem to be good choices, although I would probably throw in the
    >>>Panasonic FZ30 as a contender if the slightly lower resolution/
    >>>slightly higher noise are not issues. It has the best lens in class, I
    >>>think..
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>But I also REALLY like the very large LCD on the Sony
    >>>>and the option to add a number of lens extensions, etc.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Yes, big LCD's are nice.. You *can* also add-on lenses (carefully) to
    >>>the Fuji - it has a 58mm filter thread. Note that add-ons for these
    >>>sort of lenses are often big and heavy, so they may need support.
    >>>Thankfully the Fuji has a mechanical zoom, so at least you won't be
    >>>loading up an electric motor if you unwisely decide to zoom...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>The range of the Fuji lens is slightly more versatile on the wide-angle
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>end
    >>>
    >>>To me, that is a very good thing - wide angle converters are a pain in
    >>>the neck, and almost always introduce nasty quality issues. About the
    >>>only decent one I've found is the Olympus 0.7x - it's big, heavy and
    >>>has very good, if not great, optical quality.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I'm not
    >>>>sure whether the lack of true image-stabilization on the Fuji is that
    >>>>big a drawback or not.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>If you are going to shoot a lot of stuff at the tele end, and don't
    >>>want to lug a tripod, then yes, it is a big drawback.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>If you're still reading this, I'd appreciate feedback on the relative
    >>>>merits of these two cameras (and I'm still open to any other similar
    >>>>models that someone might recommend).
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>If it's any help, I currently own an Olympus C8080 for this side of my
    >>>photography. But every now and then I hanker for just a tiny bit more
    >>>lens range, and bit extra resolution and enlargability.. My very close
    >>>examination of samples from the Fuji indicate it has a small but
    >>>significant edge over my Oly's 8Mp images, and the nature of the Fuji
    >>>images is such that they sharpen exceptionally well, with minimal
    >>>haloing - they are very 'DSLR' like. See:
    >>>http://www.neocamera.com/review_fuji_s9000_crops3.html
    >>>(comparison of 20D (!) to S9000 - try sharpening the Fuji side and try
    >>>to spot the difference..)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>From imaging-resource.. "..the S9000's default sharpening only extends
    >>>
    >>>about a pixel from the edge on the light side of the tone curve, a good
    >>>level, not producing excessive artifacts in the images. (This is why
    >>>the S9000's images take unsharp masking on the computer as well as they
    >>>do.) While not shown here, the S9000's low sharpening setting pretty
    >>>completely removes all sharpening artifacts, making images shot in that
    >>>mode particularly well suited for post-capture sharpening on the
    >>>computer. Very nice..."
    >>>The imaging-resource Imatest results are also very interesting,
    >>>indicating that the Fuji does manage to outperform 8Mp DSLR's in terms
    >>>of resolution. Yes, I know that isn't all the story, but given the
    >>>Fuji chip gives very good low-noise performance, and that it's dynamic
    >>>range is also at the top of the heap... One problem with the Fuji -
    >>>raw shooting is slow, and the supplied raw software support is poor
    >>>(although there are good, and free, third party solutions). Sony has
    >>>no raw, strangely..
    >>>
    >>>And I also like the idea of having 300mm instead of my Oly's 140mm.
    >>>Being from the old school, I always lug a big tripod, or at least have
    >>>my trusty beanbag.. so IS isn't a deal breaker for me. So I'm
    >>>currently thinking about moving to the Fuji. The olympus is a fine
    >>>camera, but I really like the look and colour of the Fuji images.
    >>>
    >>>Note that the Fuji has only a simple hotshoe, but the H5 has no hotshoe
    >>>at all.
    >>>
    >>>Hope that helps in a small way.. As you can see, I'm leaning in a Fuji
    >>>direction, but everyone is different. (O:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >
    >
    >
     
    BRH, Jul 17, 2006
    #7
  8. BRH

    m Ransley Guest

    The Fuji doesnt have image stabilisation, with a long zoom you need it.
    Check out reviews dpreview puts the H2-H5 at the top. You should also
    consider Canon S3is, but the H5 is sharper, less noise, 7 mp, and a
    better Lcd. The fuji realy cant compare without IS
     
    m Ransley, Jul 17, 2006
    #8
  9. BRH

    BRH Guest

    m Ransley wrote:
    > The Fuji doesnt have image stabilisation, with a long zoom you need it.
    > Check out reviews dpreview puts the H2-H5 at the top. You should also
    > consider Canon S3is, but the H5 is sharper, less noise, 7 mp, and a
    > better Lcd. The fuji realy cant compare without IS
    >


    I really liked the H5, except for the location/accessibility of the zoom
    controls. I've got a bad thumb and have trouble accessing the zoom
    controls when aiming that camera. I also want an LCD that's at least
    2.5", so the Canon is out. I agree with you that IS is mandatory with
    these high zoom levels, so the Fujis are out.

    So, it looks like the Panasonic FZ7 is the best compromise for my situation.

    I'm presently searching the web for the best deal. I'm leaning towards
    Amazon - $310 after $30 discount for signing up for an Amazon CC, and
    free shipping too.

    If anyone knows of a better price from a reputable vendor, I'm interested.
     
    BRH, Jul 17, 2006
    #9
  10. BRH

    perry lee Guest

    I have just ordered the S9000 from Dell, and it will be here either
    tomorrow or Thursday -- I hope!

    I did a side by side between the Fuji and the SONY DSC-R1, and finally
    settled on the Fuji. One of the selling points for me is the Fuji has a
    cable release socket, and I like to take deep slow shots from a tripod
    at 40 ASA.

    Deciding where to buy the camera was easy. Dell has the MSRP at US$699,
    with a US$139 discount. There is also a US$100 mail in rebate on their
    website, with free S & H, so they are selling the camera for US$460,
    after rebate.

    I'm not a great photographer, and a lot of the finer points still elude
    me, but I will be glad to post my first observations after I have had
    the camera for a couple of days.

    In article <>, BRH <BRH>
    says...
    > m Ransley wrote:
    > > The Fuji doesnt have image stabilisation, with a long zoom you need it.
    > > Check out reviews dpreview puts the H2-H5 at the top. You should also
    > > consider Canon S3is, but the H5 is sharper, less noise, 7 mp, and a
    > > better Lcd. The fuji realy cant compare without IS
    > >

    >
    > I really liked the H5, except for the location/accessibility of the zoom
    > controls. I've got a bad thumb and have trouble accessing the zoom
    > controls when aiming that camera. I also want an LCD that's at least
    > 2.5", so the Canon is out. I agree with you that IS is mandatory with
    > these high zoom levels, so the Fujis are out.
    >
    > So, it looks like the Panasonic FZ7 is the best compromise for my situation.
    >
    > I'm presently searching the web for the best deal. I'm leaning towards
    > Amazon - $310 after $30 discount for signing up for an Amazon CC, and
    > free shipping too.
    >
    > If anyone knows of a better price from a reputable vendor, I'm interested.
    >
    >
     
    perry lee, Jul 19, 2006
    #10
  11. BRH

    SJ Guest

    Perry, I was "ready to go" with the Fuji, when all I read was "no image
    stabilization", over and over in different columns. I will need to shoot at
    full or near full zoom and from what I'm reading, (of course, remember,
    there're only opinions), is that you really need the image stabilizer with
    this length of zoom. Please let me know how it works. I like the Sony's,
    but hate the fact you have to buy their memory stick only,( unless I'm wrong
    on that point). I'm really looking into the panasonic FZ30 or the Canon S3.
    I'm really doing the research.
    good luck. Please keep me posted on the Fuji, it was my initial first
    choice.
    Scott


    "perry lee" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    I have just ordered the S9000 from Dell, and it will be here either
    tomorrow or Thursday -- I hope!

    I did a side by side between the Fuji and the SONY DSC-R1, and finally
    settled on the Fuji. One of the selling points for me is the Fuji has a
    cable release socket, and I like to take deep slow shots from a tripod
    at 40 ASA.

    Deciding where to buy the camera was easy. Dell has the MSRP at US$699,
    with a US$139 discount. There is also a US$100 mail in rebate on their
    website, with free S & H, so they are selling the camera for US$460,
    after rebate.

    I'm not a great photographer, and a lot of the finer points still elude
    me, but I will be glad to post my first observations after I have had
    the camera for a couple of days.

    In article <>, BRH <BRH>
    says...
    > m Ransley wrote:
    > > The Fuji doesnt have image stabilisation, with a long zoom you need it.
    > > Check out reviews dpreview puts the H2-H5 at the top. You should also
    > > consider Canon S3is, but the H5 is sharper, less noise, 7 mp, and a
    > > better Lcd. The fuji realy cant compare without IS
    > >

    >
    > I really liked the H5, except for the location/accessibility of the zoom
    > controls. I've got a bad thumb and have trouble accessing the zoom
    > controls when aiming that camera. I also want an LCD that's at least
    > 2.5", so the Canon is out. I agree with you that IS is mandatory with
    > these high zoom levels, so the Fujis are out.
    >
    > So, it looks like the Panasonic FZ7 is the best compromise for my

    situation.
    >
    > I'm presently searching the web for the best deal. I'm leaning towards
    > Amazon - $310 after $30 discount for signing up for an Amazon CC, and
    > free shipping too.
    >
    > If anyone knows of a better price from a reputable vendor, I'm interested.
    >
    >
     
    SJ, Jul 19, 2006
    #11
  12. BRH

    Guest

    SJ wrote:
    > Perry, I was "ready to go" with the Fuji, when all I read was "no image
    > stabilization", over and over in different columns. I will need to shoot at
    > full or near full zoom..


    If that's true, and your priority is long shooting without lugging a
    big tripod, then the Fuji would be a bad choice, imo. Go with the H5
    or FZ30, or think hard about a DSLR.. or if you are not in a hurry,
    maybe the 10Mp FZ50 might be of interest:

    http://www.dpreview.com/news/0607/06071905panasonicfz50.asp

    ...but I would be waiting for the reviews, first..
     
    , Jul 19, 2006
    #12
  13. BRH

    m Ransley Guest

    The only reason I did not buy Fuji was no I.S. the H5 was my choise, no
    reviews put the fuji long zoom in the same league as Canon, Sony,
    Panasonic or Kodak only because of the lack of I.S. Before you decide
    its a keeper go to any store selling long zooms , try one and turn the
    I.S. off, then on. The difference is so dramatic , you can actualy use
    them without a tripod , increasing your value in all situations, you do
    gain 2-4 stops. Dell will exchange it. Now if Panasonic only used fujis
    sensor and Fuji used Panasonics I.S. they would have winners. Canon uses
    Sony sensors, Sony just keeps the 1mp better for themselves first.
     
    m Ransley, Jul 19, 2006
    #13
  14. BRH

    perry lee Guest

    Dell was good to their word: the camera was here on Wednesday.

    First of all I am astounded by the lightness, but then I am comparing to
    a 35 mm Mamiya, and I need to remember that there is no film transport,
    mirror, shutter mechanism etc. I am in awe of the super macro, that
    lets me put the camera right next to a flower and get images in perfect
    focus, then print them out in full letter with no loss. I have also
    done some shots using shutter priority and I have also tried aperture
    priority.

    The controls are very straightforward, and all of the shooting settings
    are only a click or two away. There is a command dial next to the mode
    dial that controls whatever setting you have chosen on the mode dial.
    Choose Aperture, and the command dial changes the f setting. Choose
    shutter speed, and the command dial clicks through all of the shutter
    speeds.

    The zoom lens is a 10.7 zoom, and it is very smooth, and marked on the
    barrel! The focus ring is right behind the zoom, and it too is very
    smooth.

    So far, the lack of image stabilisation has not been a problem, but as I
    said before, I am very careful in my shot composition, preferring to set
    up a tripod with a cable release. We have company coming in this
    weekend, and I will be able to do more "shooting from the hip," but so
    far, I LOVE it! A real steal at $460.00


    In article <>,
    says...
    > I have just ordered the S9000 from Dell, and it will be here either
    > tomorrow or Thursday -- I hope!
    >
    > I did a side by side between the Fuji and the SONY DSC-R1, and finally
    > settled on the Fuji. One of the selling points for me is the Fuji has a
    > cable release socket, and I like to take deep slow shots from a tripod
    > at 40 ASA.
    >
    > Deciding where to buy the camera was easy. Dell has the MSRP at US$699,
    > with a US$139 discount. There is also a US$100 mail in rebate on their
    > website, with free S & H, so they are selling the camera for US$460,
    > after rebate.
    >
    > I'm not a great photographer, and a lot of the finer points still elude
    > me, but I will be glad to post my first observations after I have had
    > the camera for a couple of days.
    >
     
    perry lee, Jul 22, 2006
    #14
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