Some advice for an overseas traveller

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Spencer, Feb 24, 2008.

  1. Spencer

    Spencer Guest

    Hi
    I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am
    reasonably proficient with basic software and use of Google, but I lack
    technical skills. I also enjoy overseas travel (recreational) and when I
    can find them,use internet cafes to keep in touch I have a trip to
    Europe booked for later this year and would like to persue the
    possiblity of taking a small computer but need lots of advice and
    comment. So, PLEASE help!!
    My basic requirements are to send and receive emails, read the Hearald
    on line, get walking and sightseeing instructions, store and edit my
    photos and monitor my financial affairs. I have looked at some of the
    hotels I will be using and most seem to offer wireless internet. How
    does this work and are ther any inherent problems?
    I would also like any comment on what type on machine I need. being
    older weight is a consideration. What about the Asus eee?
    Nny comments will be appreciated.
    Thanks
    Spencer
    Spencer, Feb 24, 2008
    #1
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  2. Spencer

    Puddle Guest

    Spencer wrote:
    > Hi
    > I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am
    > reasonably proficient with basic software and use of Google, but I lack
    > technical skills. I also enjoy overseas travel (recreational) and when I
    > can find them,use internet cafes to keep in touch I have a trip to
    > Europe booked for later this year and would like to persue the
    > possiblity of taking a small computer but need lots of advice and
    > comment. So, PLEASE help!!
    > My basic requirements are to send and receive emails, read the Hearald
    > on line, get walking and sightseeing instructions, store and edit my
    > photos and monitor my financial affairs. I have looked at some of the
    > hotels I will be using and most seem to offer wireless internet. How
    > does this work and are ther any inherent problems?
    > I would also like any comment on what type on machine I need. being
    > older weight is a consideration. What about the Asus eee?
    > Nny comments will be appreciated.
    > Thanks
    > Spencer
    >


    You just need a laptop with wireless or even if it doesn't you can pick
    up a wireless card which would just plugin to it.

    The Asus eee has wireless builtin and would easily cover everything you
    want to do which you listed. I have not used one however so cannot
    comment on what they are like to use. Though the size of the keyboard
    scares me a little but if you weren't using it for long periods of time
    I am sure that wouldn't be an issue. There are some people here that
    have them so they will be able to give their opinions I am sure. They
    do look ideal for what you want though due to their small size and being
    able to stuff them in a backpack etc :).

    Be aware that wireless isn't that safe and if the wireless is not using
    any security such as WPA then people can listen to what you are sending
    so keep that in mind if you go to do something such as internet banking etc.

    Best of luck with your travels and with whatever you end up buying.
    Puddle, Feb 24, 2008
    #2
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  3. Spencer

    Justin Guest

    Spencer wrote:
    > Hi
    > I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am
    > reasonably proficient with basic software and use of Google, but I lack
    > technical skills. I also enjoy overseas travel (recreational) and when I
    > can find them,use internet cafes to keep in touch I have a trip to
    > Europe booked for later this year and would like to persue the
    > possiblity of taking a small computer but need lots of advice and
    > comment. So, PLEASE help!!
    > My basic requirements are to send and receive emails, read the Hearald
    > on line, get walking and sightseeing instructions, store and edit my
    > photos and monitor my financial affairs. I have looked at some of the
    > hotels I will be using and most seem to offer wireless internet. How
    > does this work and are ther any inherent problems?
    > I would also like any comment on what type on machine I need. being
    > older weight is a consideration. What about the Asus eee?
    > Nny comments will be appreciated.
    > Thanks
    > Spencer
    >


    From my experiance of a 6 week trip including Los Angeles, London, 27
    day coach tour of Europe, Paris and Hong Kong you will be having a lot
    of fun in places getting internet connectivity.

    Many places advertising Wireless LAN usually charge for it too. This
    varies a lot from free (wires in Howard Johnston Anaheim) to 10Euro for
    30 min access (total online time, not one session)

    I ended up just connecting where I could for reasonable cost and waiting
    till the next stop where I could not.

    Make sure you are conversant with your machine's wireless setup and heed
    Puddle's advice about security.

    One useful site I found which helped me a lot was
    http://www.tripadvisor.com/. Some of the reviews of places we stayed
    were illuminating. Just watch out for those people who just had a bad day!

    Have a great trip.
    Justin, Feb 24, 2008
    #3
  4. Spencer

    ChrisOD Guest

    On 2008-02-24, Spencer <> wrote:
    > Hi
    > I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am
    > reasonably proficient with basic software and use of Google, but I lack
    > technical skills. I also enjoy overseas travel (recreational) and when I
    > can find them,use internet cafes to keep in touch I have a trip to
    > Europe booked for later this year and would like to persue the
    > possiblity of taking a small computer but need lots of advice and
    > comment. So, PLEASE help!!
    > My basic requirements are to send and receive emails, read the Hearald
    > on line, get walking and sightseeing instructions, store and edit my
    > photos and monitor my financial affairs. I have looked at some of the
    > hotels I will be using and most seem to offer wireless internet. How
    > does this work and are ther any inherent problems?
    > I would also like any comment on what type on machine I need. being
    > older weight is a consideration. What about the Asus eee?
    > Nny comments will be appreciated.
    > Thanks
    > Spencer
    >

    I recently spent 5 weeks in France and found that the connectivity varied
    a LOT.

    Previously I had only really travelled in Europe in corporate land,
    where connectivity in business hotels was a requirement and cost was
    secondary. Recreational travel was different.

    Paris in the 1ere (1st) arrondisment I stayed at the Westin Paris
    fancy suite with broadband etc. (airpoints) it didn't work. Used the
    "Business centre"

    Paris in the Lamarck area apartment and used Internet cafes that
    advertised Wi-Fi (Wee-Fee in France) they seldom worked either.

    Mostly I just looked for some young un with mostly Mac Lappy sitting
    on a step or in a park and asked them what Wi-Fi they used and hooked
    into that. Paris and France generally is full of open Wi-Fi. I could
    normally see 6 or more open networks.

    In the south surprisingly most of the maison d'hotel had working Wi-Fi

    But if not just wait until you are driving through a town and pull
    over and ....

    Chris
    ChrisOD, Feb 25, 2008
    #4
  5. Spencer

    PeeCee Guest

    "Spencer" <> wrote in message
    news:fpss2h$hft$...
    > Hi
    > I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am
    > reasonably proficient with basic software and use of Google, but I lack
    > technical skills. I also enjoy overseas travel (recreational) and when I
    > can find them,use internet cafes to keep in touch I have a trip to Europe
    > booked for later this year and would like to persue the possiblity of
    > taking a small computer but need lots of advice and comment. So, PLEASE
    > help!!
    > My basic requirements are to send and receive emails, read the Hearald on
    > line, get walking and sightseeing instructions, store and edit my photos
    > and monitor my financial affairs. I have looked at some of the hotels I
    > will be using and most seem to offer wireless internet. How does this work
    > and are ther any inherent problems?
    > I would also like any comment on what type on machine I need. being older
    > weight is a consideration. What about the Asus eee?
    > Nny comments will be appreciated.
    > Thanks
    > Spencer
    >



    Spencer.

    A normal Laptop in a way is a pain in the rear on a overseas bus trip,
    During a Europe trip I did I hid mine in the middle of my luggage bag each
    day & prayed it would not be discovered.
    Get a Kensington Lock cable.

    Handy for photo storage, though one is usually so busy sightseeing just
    backing up one's photo's is about all one should attempt.

    The Asus Eee wouldn't be a bad alternative, as long as you appreciate it
    runs Linux and not Windows so if you run into Laptop problems support could
    be difficult to find.

    If you stick to Web interfaces the Eee should be fine enough.

    An Eee and two 2.5" external hard drives would be a nice tidy surfing/backup
    combo.

    Alternatively look at the Camera to Hard drive Bridge devices that are
    available.
    (not in your face common, but they are around)

    Haven't been to UK/Europe since WiFi became common (I went in 2002) but a
    lady I know who spends a lot of time in France tells me she just cruises
    around until she finds an open WiFi cafe and sits outside checking her
    email.

    The Hotels I've been to have murderous fees for Wireless (Aus/NZ but I
    believe UK/Europe is the same)

    Don't forget your plug adaptors.
    One small trick is to take a good old kiwi power strip, that way you'll only
    need one set of power adaptors for the strip plug, everything else just uses
    the normal NZ plug into the strip. (and they add up, cell phone, PDA,
    Laptop, Camera, the wifes cell phone and camera chargers)


    Best
    Paul.
    PeeCee, Feb 25, 2008
    #5
  6. Spencer

    BTMO Guest

    "PeeCee" <> wrote


    > A normal Laptop in a way is a pain in the rear on a overseas bus trip,
    > During a Europe trip I did I hid mine in the middle of my luggage bag each
    > day & prayed it would not be discovered.
    > Get a Kensington Lock cable.


    My partner got a Sony Vaio last year - the small one. She loves it. It is
    light, small, powerful, fully featured and has a good keyboard.

    I am guessing it is going to be a treat to travel with.

    That said - when we were in Greece and Turkey last year, we found so many
    internet cafes we didn't need a PC.

    However, we DID notice that most places had either free or cheap wireless
    available.

    When we got to Australia, the wheels fell off. It was hopeless - apart from
    downtown Melbourne. There was free, open networks everywhere!

    :-D

    > Handy for photo storage, though one is usually so busy sightseeing just
    > backing up one's photo's is about all one should attempt.
    >
    > The Asus Eee wouldn't be a bad alternative, as long as you appreciate it
    > runs Linux and not Windows so if you run into Laptop problems support
    > could be difficult to find.


    For travelling, I think they would be pretty much ideal. I would have bought
    one in Greece - but they only had the demo model in the shop, and no pricing
    available. Now, with the Vaio available, I probably won't bother.

    Probably.

    > If you stick to Web interfaces the Eee should be fine enough.
    >
    > An Eee and two 2.5" external hard drives would be a nice tidy
    > surfing/backup combo.


    Agree.

    But I use big cards in my camera - I can take about 1500 photos before I
    need to download.

    > Alternatively look at the Camera to Hard drive Bridge devices that are
    > available.
    > (not in your face common, but they are around)
    >
    > Haven't been to UK/Europe since WiFi became common (I went in 2002) but a
    > lady I know who spends a lot of time in France tells me she just cruises
    > around until she finds an open WiFi cafe and sits outside checking her
    > email.


    I suspect much of Europe is like this today.

    > The Hotels I've been to have murderous fees for Wireless (Aus/NZ but I
    > believe UK/Europe is the same)
    >
    > Don't forget your plug adaptors.
    > One small trick is to take a good old kiwi power strip, that way you'll
    > only need one set of power adaptors for the strip plug, everything else
    > just uses the normal NZ plug into the strip. (and they add up, cell phone,
    > PDA, Laptop, Camera, the wifes cell phone and camera chargers)


    Good advice - or just plan your day out...

    ;-)
    BTMO, Feb 25, 2008
    #6
  7. Spencer

    Damos Guest

    On Mon, 25 Feb 2008 11:47:43 +1300, Spencer <> wrote:

    > Hi
    > I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am
    > reasonably proficient with basic software and use of Google, but I lack
    > technical skills. I also enjoy overseas travel (recreational) and when I
    > can find them,use internet cafes to keep in touch I have a trip to
    > Europe booked for later this year and would like to persue the
    > possiblity of taking a small computer but need lots of advice and
    > comment. So, PLEASE help!!
    > My basic requirements are to send and receive emails, read the Hearald
    > on line, get walking and sightseeing instructions, store and edit my
    > photos and monitor my financial affairs. I have looked at some of the
    > hotels I will be using and most seem to offer wireless internet. How
    > does this work and are ther any inherent problems?
    > I would also like any comment on what type on machine I need. being
    > older weight is a consideration. What about the Asus eee?
    > Nny comments will be appreciated.
    > Thanks
    > Spencer
    >





    Well it seems that I am in a minority here.I would say dont take a laptop
    at all. Use the internet cafe's.
    I lived and backpacked through europe and uk for three years til 2003.
    Found cafe's even on smaller islands such as malta and smaller towns
    in eastern turkey. Couldn't buy a beer and the gfirend was essentialy
    wearing a berka but the towns all had internet.

    Many hotels that I stayed at also had at least one pc sitting around for
    guest use.

    Use free webmail for email. There are risks with financial details I
    realise but how big are the risks when using the very large commercial
    cafe's.
    ie easy net (same guy who ran easy jet). You'll be living on your credit
    card so unless your going for months you might get away with all your
    travelling within one bill cycle so pay when you get home. Alt would be to
    get someone else to open your credit statement at home and pay the bills
    with some presigned cheques. That way you never access financial details
    on line while overseas.

    Copy the photo's to disk at a booth then upload them to flicker or similar
    (or copy copy from the card in the camera)

    I would always be worried about where the laptop is and risks of theft and
    the weight wont be worth it.


    Damos.


    --
    "It's a foreboding I have - maybe ill placed - of my children's generation
    or my grandchildren's generation ... when clutching our horoscopes, our
    critical faculties in steep decline, unable to distinguish between what
    right and what feels good, we slide, almost without noticing, into
    superstition and darkness."

    Carl Sagan.
    Damos, Feb 25, 2008
    #7
  8. Spencer

    Keith Guest

    In article <>, says...
    >
    > But I use big cards in my camera - I can take about 1500 photos before I
    > need to download.


    Bit dangerous without backup?
    Keith, Feb 25, 2008
    #8
  9. Spencer

    BTMO Guest

    "Keith" <> wrote

    >> But I use big cards in my camera - I can take about 1500 photos before I
    >> need to download.

    >
    > Bit dangerous without backup?


    Life is full of risks...

    I like to travel light. If I lose the photos, I lose them. I still have
    memories.

    And (so far) lots of photos.
    BTMO, Feb 25, 2008
    #9
  10. Spencer

    trueone Guest

    "Spencer" <> wrote in message
    news:fpss2h$hft$...
    > Hi
    > I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am

    .. What about the Asus eee?
    > Nny comments will be appreciated.
    > Thanks
    > Spencer



    Hi, I have just bought the eeepc for that purpose. It is ideal in most
    respects. I will however put winxp on mine. My esyesight is not the best
    now and I have increased the text size to make it easier to read. I find
    the 7 inch screen a little too small but usable. The keyboard I manage with
    no problems even though I have fat fingers. I would take either a small
    usb hard drive to put photos on or else usb memory stick.

    If like me your eyesight is week you may want to wait a month or 2 when Asus
    releases the eeepc with a 9 or 10 inch screen.

    Gilbert
    trueone, Feb 26, 2008
    #10
  11. BTMO wrote:

    >> Haven't been to UK/Europe since WiFi became common (I went in 2002) but a
    >> lady I know who spends a lot of time in France tells me she just cruises
    >> around until she finds an open WiFi cafe and sits outside checking her
    >> email.

    >
    > I suspect much of Europe is like this today.


    Not really, like everyone else, if there is money to be made they will
    charge for it. You will find the odd open hotspot, even the free
    services that some councils have promised haven't turned up at all/
    Jason Fanning, Feb 26, 2008
    #11
  12. Spencer

    Spencer Guest

    trueone wrote:
    >
    > "Spencer" <> wrote in message
    > news:fpss2h$hft$...
    >
    >> Hi
    >> I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am

    >
    > . What about the Asus eee?
    >
    >> Nny comments will be appreciated.
    >> Thanks
    >> Spencer

    >
    >
    >
    > Hi, I have just bought the eeepc for that purpose. It is ideal in
    > most respects. I will however put winxp on mine. My esyesight is not
    > the best now and I have increased the text size to make it easier to
    > read. I find the 7 inch screen a little too small but usable. The
    > keyboard I manage with no problems even though I have fat fingers. I
    > would take either a small usb hard drive to put photos on or else usb
    > memory stick.
    >
    > If like me your eyesight is week you may want to wait a month or 2 when
    > Asus releases the eeepc with a 9 or 10 inch screen.
    >
    > Gilbert

    Thanks Gilbert and all who replied. I am grateful for your advice.
    Gilbert, It looks as if our need are similar! My trip does not start
    until mid August so a delay is OK. Do you have any info that a bigger
    screen model may come on the market?
    Spencer, Feb 26, 2008
    #12
  13. Spencer

    PeeCee Guest

    "Keith" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>, says...
    >>
    >> But I use big cards in my camera - I can take about 1500 photos before I
    >> need to download.

    >
    > Bit dangerous without backup?



    Greetings Keith

    IMHO it depends on the time scale involved.

    If you're leaving your photo's on a memory stick over day's and weeks as I
    have seen people do, then yes 'unsafe practice'.

    On the other hand using big cards so you can keep going without changing
    cards every hour is quite acceptable.

    Best
    Paul.
    PeeCee, Feb 26, 2008
    #13
  14. Spencer

    trueone Guest

    "Spencer" <> wrote in message
    news:fq22pk$kt5$...
    > trueone wrote:
    >>
    >> "Spencer" <> wrote in message
    >> news:fpss2h$hft$...
    >>
    >>> Hi
    >>> I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am

    >>
    >> . What about the Asus eee?
    >>
    >>> Nny comments will be appreciated.
    >>> Thanks
    >>> Spencer

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Hi, I have just bought the eeepc for that purpose. It is ideal in most
    >> respects. I will however put winxp on mine. My esyesight is not the
    >> best now and I have increased the text size to make it easier to read. I
    >> find the 7 inch screen a little too small but usable. The keyboard I
    >> manage with no problems even though I have fat fingers. I would take
    >> either a small usb hard drive to put photos on or else usb memory stick.
    >>
    >> If like me your eyesight is week you may want to wait a month or 2 when
    >> Asus releases the eeepc with a 9 or 10 inch screen.
    >>
    >> Gilbert

    > Thanks Gilbert and all who replied. I am grateful for your advice.
    > Gilbert, It looks as if our need are similar! My trip does not start until
    > mid August so a delay is OK. Do you have any info that a bigger screen
    > model may come on the market?



    I cant find the actual link now but they are addressing it. You can find
    out more by going to www.eeeuser.com and follow all the threads there.
    Gilbert
    trueone, Feb 26, 2008
    #14
  15. Spencer

    Squiggle Guest

    PeeCee wrote:
    > "Keith" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> In article <>, says...
    >>>
    >>> But I use big cards in my camera - I can take about 1500 photos before I
    >>> need to download.

    >>
    >> Bit dangerous without backup?

    >
    >
    > Greetings Keith
    >
    > IMHO it depends on the time scale involved.
    >
    > If you're leaving your photo's on a memory stick over day's and weeks as
    > I have seen people do, then yes 'unsafe practice'.


    How so? I can't any reason why the flash memory on a usb memory stick
    would be any less reliable than the memory on a SD/CF flash card.

    Or are you thinking the likelyhood of damaging/losing the memory stick
    is higher?
    Squiggle, Feb 27, 2008
    #15
  16. Spencer

    Jerry Guest

    Keith wrote:
    > In article <>, says...
    >> But I use big cards in my camera - I can take about 1500 photos before I
    >> need to download.

    >
    > Bit dangerous without backup?


    How about a PSD? http://www.flashcards.co.nz/catalog/index.php?cPath=26_188
    if you carry one of those and a laptop too you have backup! I carry a
    PSD in my camera bag and a laptop. Of course if both get lost or
    stolen, oh well....
    Jerry, Feb 27, 2008
    #16
  17. Spencer

    PeeCee Guest

    "Squiggle" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > PeeCee wrote:
    >> "Keith" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> In article <>, says...
    >>>>
    >>>> But I use big cards in my camera - I can take about 1500 photos before
    >>>> I
    >>>> need to download.
    >>>
    >>> Bit dangerous without backup?

    >>
    >>
    >> Greetings Keith
    >>
    >> IMHO it depends on the time scale involved.
    >>
    >> If you're leaving your photo's on a memory stick over day's and weeks as
    >> I have seen people do, then yes 'unsafe practice'.

    >
    > How so? I can't any reason why the flash memory on a usb memory stick
    > would be any less reliable than the memory on a SD/CF flash card.
    >
    > Or are you thinking the likelyhood of damaging/losing the memory stick is
    > higher?



    Hi Squiggle

    My thinking (and experience for that matter) is the longer you leave it
    before backing up the greater the chance photo's/files it will get
    lost/deleted/overwritten......


    Paul.
    PeeCee, Feb 27, 2008
    #17
  18. Spencer

    JohnO Guest

    On Feb 25, 7:49 am, "PeeCee" <> wrote:
    > "Spencer" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:fpss2h$hft$...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Hi
    > > I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am
    > > reasonably proficient with basic software and use of Google, but I lack
    > > technical skills. I also enjoy overseas travel (recreational) and when I
    > > can find them,use internet cafes to keep in touch  I have a trip to Europe
    > > booked for later this year and would like to persue the possiblity of
    > > taking a small computer but need lots of advice and comment. So, PLEASE
    > > help!!
    > > My basic requirements are to send and receive emails, read the Hearald on
    > > line, get walking and sightseeing instructions, store and edit my photos
    > > and monitor my financial affairs. I have looked at some of the hotels I
    > > will be using and most seem to offer wireless internet. How does this work
    > > and are ther any inherent problems?
    > > I would also like any comment on what type on machine I need. being older
    > > weight is a consideration. What about the Asus eee?
    > > Nny comments will be appreciated.
    > > Thanks
    > > Spencer

    >
    > Spencer.
    >
    > A normal Laptop in a way is a pain in the rear on a overseas bus trip,
    > During a Europe trip I did I hid mine in the middle of my luggage bag each
    > day & prayed it would not be discovered.
    > Get a Kensington Lock cable.
    >
    > Handy for photo storage,  though one is usually so busy sightseeing just
    > backing up one's photo's is about all one should attempt.
    >
    > The Asus Eee wouldn't be a bad alternative, as long as you appreciate it
    > runs Linux and not Windows so if you run into Laptop problems support could
    > be difficult to find.
    >
    > If you stick to Web interfaces the Eee should be fine enough.
    >
    > An Eee and two 2.5" external hard drives would be a nice tidy surfing/backup
    > combo.
    >
    > Alternatively look at the Camera to Hard drive Bridge devices that are
    > available.
    > (not in your face common, but they are around)
    >
    > Haven't been to UK/Europe since WiFi became common (I went in 2002) but a
    > lady I know who spends a lot of time in France tells me she just cruises
    > around until she finds an open WiFi cafe and sits outside checking her
    > email.
    >
    > The Hotels I've been to have murderous fees for Wireless (Aus/NZ but I
    > believe UK/Europe is the same)
    >
    > Don't forget your plug adaptors.
    > One small trick is to take a good old kiwi power strip, that way you'll only
    > need one set of power adaptors for the strip plug, everything else just uses
    > the normal NZ plug into the strip. (and they add up, cell phone, PDA,
    > Laptop, Camera, the wifes cell phone and camera chargers)
    >
    > Best
    > Paul.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Paul, if you flew through airports such as Heathrow with a laptop in
    your checked in baggage and it didn't get stolen then you are lucky!

    I heard that the security xrays were identifying the laptops and they
    were routinely getting pinched.
    JohnO, Feb 27, 2008
    #18
  19. Spencer

    PeeCee Guest

    "JohnO" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Feb 25, 7:49 am, "PeeCee" <> wrote:
    > "Spencer" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:fpss2h$hft$...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Hi
    > > I am an older person who enjoys the time spent at the keyboard.I am
    > > reasonably proficient with basic software and use of Google, but I lack
    > > technical skills. I also enjoy overseas travel (recreational) and when I
    > > can find them,use internet cafes to keep in touch I have a trip to
    > > Europe
    > > booked for later this year and would like to persue the possiblity of
    > > taking a small computer but need lots of advice and comment. So, PLEASE
    > > help!!
    > > My basic requirements are to send and receive emails, read the Hearald
    > > on
    > > line, get walking and sightseeing instructions, store and edit my photos
    > > and monitor my financial affairs. I have looked at some of the hotels I
    > > will be using and most seem to offer wireless internet. How does this
    > > work
    > > and are ther any inherent problems?
    > > I would also like any comment on what type on machine I need. being
    > > older
    > > weight is a consideration. What about the Asus eee?
    > > Nny comments will be appreciated.
    > > Thanks
    > > Spencer

    >
    > Spencer.
    >
    > A normal Laptop in a way is a pain in the rear on a overseas bus trip,
    > During a Europe trip I did I hid mine in the middle of my luggage bag each
    > day & prayed it would not be discovered.
    > Get a Kensington Lock cable.
    >
    > Handy for photo storage, though one is usually so busy sightseeing just
    > backing up one's photo's is about all one should attempt.
    >
    > The Asus Eee wouldn't be a bad alternative, as long as you appreciate it
    > runs Linux and not Windows so if you run into Laptop problems support
    > could
    > be difficult to find.
    >
    > If you stick to Web interfaces the Eee should be fine enough.
    >
    > An Eee and two 2.5" external hard drives would be a nice tidy
    > surfing/backup
    > combo.
    >
    > Alternatively look at the Camera to Hard drive Bridge devices that are
    > available.
    > (not in your face common, but they are around)
    >
    > Haven't been to UK/Europe since WiFi became common (I went in 2002) but a
    > lady I know who spends a lot of time in France tells me she just cruises
    > around until she finds an open WiFi cafe and sits outside checking her
    > email.
    >
    > The Hotels I've been to have murderous fees for Wireless (Aus/NZ but I
    > believe UK/Europe is the same)
    >
    > Don't forget your plug adaptors.
    > One small trick is to take a good old kiwi power strip, that way you'll
    > only
    > need one set of power adaptors for the strip plug, everything else just
    > uses
    > the normal NZ plug into the strip. (and they add up, cell phone, PDA,
    > Laptop, Camera, the wifes cell phone and camera chargers)
    >
    > Best
    > Paul.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Paul, if you flew through airports such as Heathrow with a laptop in
    your checked in baggage and it didn't get stolen then you are lucky!

    I heard that the security xrays were identifying the laptops and they
    were routinely getting pinched.

    ******************************

    I can believe that, however I allways fly with my laptop as cabin baggage.
    The trip I was refering to was one of those Europe in x days bus trips where
    the bag was either on the bus or in our room.
    Must admit I would think twice about doing it again these day's.

    Best
    Paul.
    PeeCee, Feb 28, 2008
    #19
  20. Spencer

    Jason Rumney Guest

    On 25 Feb, 07:49, "PeeCee" <> wrote:

    > Don't forget your plug adaptors.
    > One small trick is to take a good old kiwi power strip, that way you'll only
    > need one set of power adaptors for the strip plug, everything else just uses
    > the normal NZ plug into the strip. (and they add up, cell phone, PDA,
    > Laptop, Camera, the wifes cell phone and camera chargers)


    I have a power adapter with changeable plugs and a USB socket, and
    cables to charge my phone and camera from USB. If I need to charge
    more than one thing at once, I can always use the USB sockets on the
    laptop (though they will only supply enough current to trickle
    charge). My laptop uses a standard two pin cable of the type often
    found on portable radios, video recorders etc. I've already got a
    collection of cables for that (NZ, US, UK, Europlug), if I'm going
    somewhere I'll just take the appropriate cable. If I don't have the
    right cable yet, I'll pack the US or Euro one for emergency use, and
    try to buy a cable after arriving (usually you can find them for a
    couple of dollars) though now that I've got those four, I haven't
    actually encountered anywhere that uses anything different. Most
    hotels have a shaver socket, so the USB power adapter can plug in
    there.

    Also worth knowing when you're travelling is that you can force a
    Europlug into a UK socket by poking something into the earth hole to
    open the gate that protects little fingers from coming into contact
    with the live socket. This saves taking both the Europlug and the
    rather heavy and bulky UK plug on a trip around Europe. If you don't
    know what earth is though, best leave this trick to the experts. It's
    also probably illegal to plug unfused plugs into the mains in the UK.
    Jason Rumney, Feb 29, 2008
    #20
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