Software to make a simple movie

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Rick Altman, Aug 13, 2007.

  1. Rick Altman

    Rick Altman Guest

    I have just returned from an Alaskan cruise and I was lucky enough to be
    very close to a calving glacier on a sunny day. I shot almost 20 frames in
    about six seconds...good enough for a modest video. I would like to know if
    there is software available for download that will do to these 20 photos
    what stitching software does to a panorama of shots: crop and size to create
    a common perspective and then produce a simple AVI. All input is
    appreciated...

    Rick A.
    Pleasanton CA
    Rick Altman, Aug 13, 2007
    #1
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  2. Rick Altman

    Matt Ion Guest

    Rick Altman wrote:
    > I have just returned from an Alaskan cruise and I was lucky enough to be
    > very close to a calving glacier on a sunny day. I shot almost 20 frames in
    > about six seconds...good enough for a modest video. I would like to know if
    > there is software available for download that will do to these 20 photos
    > what stitching software does to a panorama of shots: crop and size to create
    > a common perspective and then produce a simple AVI. All input is
    > appreciated...


    If you're using Windows XP or Vista, just use the included Windows Movie
    Maker.
    Matt Ion, Aug 13, 2007
    #2
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  3. Rick Altman

    Rick Altman Guest

    Making the movie is the easy part -- between WMM, ProShow, and Premiere, I
    can take my pick. The issue is that I did not use a tripod so the
    perspective and the angle is a bit off from one photo to the next. I need to
    "consistencize" them, and doing it without an automatic tool will be very
    tedious.

    Panorama software automatically crops, shifts, and skews images to stitch
    them together; I need something like that to prep the files before making
    them into a movie. Any ideas?



    Rick A.





    "Matt Ion" <> wrote in message
    news:j9%vi.56850$fJ5.37170@pd7urf1no...
    >
    > If you're using Windows XP or Vista, just use the included Windows Movie
    > Maker.
    Rick Altman, Aug 14, 2007
    #3
  4. Rick Altman

    PassingThru Guest

    On Mon, 13 Aug 2007 21:08:18 -0700, "Rick Altman" <>
    wrote:

    >Making the movie is the easy part -- between WMM, ProShow, and Premiere, I
    >can take my pick. The issue is that I did not use a tripod so the
    >perspective and the angle is a bit off from one photo to the next. I need to
    >"consistencize" them, and doing it without an automatic tool will be very
    >tedious.
    >
    >Panorama software automatically crops, shifts, and skews images to stitch
    >them together; I need something like that to prep the files before making
    >them into a movie. Any ideas?
    >


    Since you have so few frames to work with you might like to use the "HDR
    Alignment Tool" from http://www.flickr.com/groups/hdr/discuss/72157594229411664/
    then create your video from the resulting aligned frames.

    Or if after creating your movie directly from misaligned frames you can use a
    freeware plugin called "Deshaker" for the excellent VirtualDub (freeware)
    video-editor. It will realign and crop all frames to keep the main framing as
    still as possible. It was written to act as a post-processing
    image-stabilization (IS), doing it digitally just like many video cameras do
    today in-camera. You'll have to hunt for the plugin, it's been a few years since
    I updated my copy. I used it regularly on videos taken in the past with a camera
    that had no IS built-in. It works amazingly well for its intended purpose.
    PassingThru, Aug 14, 2007
    #4
  5. Rick Altman

    PassingThru Guest

    On Tue, 14 Aug 2007 13:09:54 GMT, PassingThru <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 13 Aug 2007 21:08:18 -0700, "Rick Altman" <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Making the movie is the easy part -- between WMM, ProShow, and Premiere, I
    >>can take my pick. The issue is that I did not use a tripod so the
    >>perspective and the angle is a bit off from one photo to the next. I need to
    >>"consistencize" them, and doing it without an automatic tool will be very
    >>tedious.
    >>
    >>Panorama software automatically crops, shifts, and skews images to stitch
    >>them together; I need something like that to prep the files before making
    >>them into a movie. Any ideas?
    >>

    >
    >Since you have so few frames to work with you might like to use the "HDR
    >Alignment Tool" from http://www.flickr.com/groups/hdr/discuss/72157594229411664/
    >then create your video from the resulting aligned frames.
    >
    >Or if after creating your movie directly from misaligned frames you can use a
    >freeware plugin called "Deshaker" for the excellent VirtualDub (freeware)
    >video-editor. It will realign and crop all frames to keep the main framing as
    >still as possible. It was written to act as a post-processing
    >image-stabilization (IS), doing it digitally just like many video cameras do
    >today in-camera. You'll have to hunt for the plugin, it's been a few years since
    >I updated my copy. I used it regularly on videos taken in the past with a camera
    >that had no IS built-in. It works amazingly well for its intended purpose.
    >
    >
    >


    While you are at it, also look for the "Smart Bob Filter" for VirtualDub. Once
    you create your short video and set the frame-rate, you can smooth the action by
    interpolating new frames between your existing ones. I don't know how many times
    you could pass a video through this filter without turning it into an
    interpolated mess, but conceivably by reapplying it you could get some
    acceptable results to get the small number of frames to match the time-span of
    the event. 20 frames in 6 seconds = ~3fps. 1st-pass = X2 = 6fps. 2nd-pass = X4 =
    12fps. That's almost up to an acceptable 15fps.

    It appears that it has to work on interlaced fields though, which means that
    you'd have to convert each full-frame images to two interlaced fields to get it
    to work properly. Many editors allow you to create interlaced-field effects.

    There might be better filters for this purpose, I just happened to notice this
    one in my VirtualDub plugins folder.

    Info from the "Smart Bob" documentation:

    "Smart Bob Filter for VirtualDub
    This filter acts similarly to the Smart Deinterlacer filter, except that it
    produces a doubled frame rate output file. For example, if the input is 30
    frames per second (fps) interlaced, the output will be 60 fps progressive. Each
    output frame is created from a single input field by either interpolating data
    or by using data from the previous frame (=field, see below), depending upon
    whether the area is detected as moving or not. The filter uses bicubic
    interpolation for best results. It also provides a "dumb bob" mode by which the
    entire frame can be interpolated regardless of motion.

    This filter thus allows the maximum possible spatial and temporal information to
    be extracted from an interlaced input clip. If the frame rate is left at double
    the input rate, and if the hardware can play at or near that rate, then very
    smooth movement (double the temporal resolution) results. If the frame rate is
    set back to the original input frame rate in the AVI header, a very smooth half
    speed slow-motion effect results. This latter mode is highly useful for
    analysing clips of sports or other actions that need to be studied.

    The Smart Bob filter acts on a clip after it has had its fields split into
    frames. There are two ways to achieve this. First, if you have an MJPEG clip
    encoded with 2 fields, you can use VirtualDub's extended open options. When
    opening your input file, check the "Popup extended open options" checkbox. Then,
    when the extended open dialog appears check "Split interlaced frame into two
    fields". You can use the swapped version if your capture card has reversed field
    dominance (you can tell because when you single-step, things move backward every
    other frame). Second, for clips that are not MJPEG encoded with two fields, Ben
    Rudiak-Gould's excellent utility, Avisynth, can be used as a preprocessor to
    split the fields into frames. It is very easy to use.

    To use Avisynth, first download the Avisynth DLL from:

    www.math.berkeley.edu/~benrg/avisynth.html "

    etc....
    PassingThru, Aug 14, 2007
    #5
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