software for developing a website

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by nospam, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. nospam

    nospam Guest

    I'm a programmer thinking of developing a website for a friend but I
    know nothing about developing websites.

    Can anyone recommend some software for this, preferably free or
    inexpensive, that runs on Windows. If it runs on the Mac as well that
    would be great, but not essential, as I run Windows and my friend has
    a MAC.

    Also, what software does a typical pro website developer use - do all
    complex websites use PHP?

    TIA
     
    nospam, Jul 27, 2011
    #1
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  2. nospam

    Enkidu Guest

    On 27/07/11 12:03, nospam wrote:
    >
    > I'm a programmer thinking of developing a website for a friend but I
    > know nothing about developing websites.
    >
    > Can anyone recommend some software for this, preferably free or
    > inexpensive, that runs on Windows. If it runs on the Mac as well that
    > would be great, but not essential, as I run Windows and my friend has
    > a MAC.
    >
    > Also, what software does a typical pro website developer use - do all
    > complex websites use PHP?
    >

    Look at something like Drupal or Joomla. Most hosters provide one or the
    other. The DESIGN is the important thing in a Web site. Sticking the
    site up is the easy part and involves no programming.

    In my opinion designers should not build web site and neither should
    developers. Specialist web developers should build web site based on a
    sound design. Programmers should only be involved for a very few 'whizzy
    bits'. In particular, you should steer away from "Flash developers" who
    frequently ruin a decent site.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The ends justifies the means - Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli.

    The end excuses any evil - Sophocles
     
    Enkidu, Jul 27, 2011
    #2
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  3. nospam

    Guest

    On Wed, 27 Jul 2011 12:03:30 +1200, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >I'm a programmer thinking of developing a website for a friend but I
    >know nothing about developing websites.
    >
    >Can anyone recommend some software for this, preferably free or
    >inexpensive, that runs on Windows. If it runs on the Mac as well that
    >would be great, but not essential, as I run Windows and my friend has
    >a MAC.
    >
    >Also, what software does a typical pro website developer use - do all
    >complex websites use PHP?
    >
    >TIA


    If you need a host for your site:
    I have never used them but you could look at
    247hosting.co.nz/

    I currently use this host in the USA
    www. hostgator.com

    For an HTML editor have a look at
    http://www.coffeecup.com/free-editor/

    At a cost they provide design templates you might or might not find
    useful. They also have an add-on that allows you to implement some
    simple flash if you really want it.

    You can use php combined with javascript to access a MySQL database
    which can be set up using phpMyAdmin. Use ajax techniques within the
    javascript to provide smooth data updating within the viewed page.

    Macromedia, now owned by Adobe, have an expensive web development
    suite that includes Dreamweaver which is a more elaborate html editor
    than coffeecup pro. The suite also includes a flash editor.

    But it is perhaps best to avoid flash. Amongst other drawbacks it
    does not run on an iPad. It strikes me that the sort of people likely
    to be impressed by flash on a website are also the sort of people
    likely to be using an iPad these days.
    HTML5 increasingly provides an alternative to flash.
     
    , Jul 27, 2011
    #3
  4. nospam

    Gordon Guest

    On 2011-07-27, <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 27 Jul 2011 12:03:30 +1200, nospam <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I'm a programmer thinking of developing a website for a friend but I
    >>know nothing about developing websites.
    >>
    >>Can anyone recommend some software for this, preferably free or
    >>inexpensive, that runs on Windows. If it runs on the Mac as well that
    >>would be great, but not essential, as I run Windows and my friend has
    >>a MAC.
    >>
    >>Also, what software does a typical pro website developer use - do all
    >>complex websites use PHP?
    >>
    >>TIA

    >
    > If you need a host for your site:
    > I have never used them but you could look at
    > 247hosting.co.nz/
    >


    As senn on TV, Fair Go, last week
     
    Gordon, Jul 28, 2011
    #4
  5. nospam

    Dave Doe Guest

    In article <>, ,
    Gordon says...
    >
    > On 2011-07-27, <> wrote:
    > > On Wed, 27 Jul 2011 12:03:30 +1200, nospam <>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >>I'm a programmer thinking of developing a website for a friend but I
    > >>know nothing about developing websites.
    > >>
    > >>Can anyone recommend some software for this, preferably free or
    > >>inexpensive, that runs on Windows. If it runs on the Mac as well that
    > >>would be great, but not essential, as I run Windows and my friend has
    > >>a MAC.
    > >>
    > >>Also, what software does a typical pro website developer use - do all
    > >>complex websites use PHP?
    > >>
    > >>TIA

    > >
    > > If you need a host for your site:
    > > I have never used them but you could look at
    > > 247hosting.co.nz/
    > >

    >
    > As senn on TV, Fair Go, last week


    Can you elaborate a bit more please Gordon? - C(heers)IA. :)

    --
    Duncan.
     
    Dave Doe, Jul 28, 2011
    #5
  6. nospam

    Ron McNulty Guest

    On Jul 27, 7:47 pm, EMB <> wrote:
    > On 27/07/2011 12:03 p.m., nospam wrote:
    >
    > > I'm a programmer thinking of developing a website for a friend but I
    > > know nothing about developing websites.

    >
    > > Can anyone recommend some software for this, preferably free or
    > > inexpensive, that runs on Windows.  If it runs on the Mac as well that
    > > would be great, but not essential, as I run Windows and my friend has
    > > a MAC.

    >
    > > Also, what software does a typical pro website developer use  - do all
    > > complex websites use PHP?

    >
    > > TIA

    >
    > Notepad++ and write it in HTML - you're a developer so use those skills.


    You say you are a programmer, so PHP is probably a good choice (It is
    open source, so free). Basically you can do almost anything in PHP,
    and it will run on any OS. CMS Systems (e.g. Joomla, Magnolia et al)
    are great for simple sites, but tend to be a bit limited when it comes
    to doing things that require databases and interactive forms. As a
    Java programmer, I would be keen to use Java rather than PHP, but the
    hosting services charge a premium for hosting something like Liferay
    portal. As a result, the two sites I maintain use PHP.

    I agree with the previous poster's "design being the key" comments. I
    have worked with a couple of design experts, and it is rewarding to
    see the great results you can acheive when there is a collaboration
    between artistic ability and technical expertise (unfortunately these
    two don't tend to come in the same cranium).

    So, as a programmer, I would suggest:

    - HTML for a site that just displays a few pretty pages
    - PHP for a moderate to complex site
    - Liferay or a similar Java Portal product if you are going to allow
    users to have accounts, have personal pages, contribute to bloggs
    etc.
    - Java JSP or MS ASP.NET for complex custom sites. JSP is free (e.g
    Apache & Tomcat), but ASP is a custom Microsoft product. There is a
    steep learning curve for both.

    PHP is very well supported. The Eclipse IDE has a reasonably good
    plugin, and a number of open-source editors are available. PHP will
    run on Windows or Linux (Just install the Apache web server and turn
    on PHP), and I think on the MAC. Nearly all hosting services offer the
    LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP). Any experience with LAMP
    looks good on your CV :) I recently purchased a huge tome on PHP +
    MySQL for $NZ60 - recommended!

    Keep in mind that once you master HTML and CSS, the associated
    implementation technology (e.g. PHP or JSP) is a smaller learning
    curve.

    Before you start, set expectations - do you need online payments? user
    accounts?, blogs? How much can you afford a month? How much traffic?
    Will the site expand? The answer to these questions will affect your
    choice of technology and hosting service. Changing technology mid-
    stream is the computing equivalent of emptying bedpans for a job, so
    is best avoided.

    Good luck

    Regards

    Ron
     
    Ron McNulty, Jul 28, 2011
    #6
  7. nospam

    Guest

    On 28 Jul 2011 05:01:57 GMT, Gordon <> wrote:

    >> If you need a host for your site:
    >> I have never used them but you could look at
    >> 247hosting.co.nz/
    >>

    >
    >As senn on TV, Fair Go, last week


    Thanks for that Gordon.
    I had been thinking of trying them.
    Here is the link to see it:
    http://tvnz.co.nz/fair-go/july-20-4315769/video?vid=4316034
     
    , Jul 28, 2011
    #7
  8. nospam

    Enkidu Guest

    On 28/07/11 19:45, Ron McNulty wrote:
    > On Jul 27, 7:47 pm, EMB<> wrote:
    >> On 27/07/2011 12:03 p.m., nospam wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'm a programmer thinking of developing a website for a friend
    >>> but I know nothing about developing websites.

    >>
    >>> Can anyone recommend some software for this, preferably free or
    >>> inexpensive, that runs on Windows. If it runs on the Mac as well
    >>> that would be great, but not essential, as I run Windows and my
    >>> friend has a MAC.

    >>
    >>> Also, what software does a typical pro website developer use -
    >>> do all complex websites use PHP?

    >>
    >>> TIA

    >>
    >> Notepad++ and write it in HTML - you're a developer so use those
    >> skills.

    >
    > You say you are a programmer, so PHP is probably a good choice (It
    > is open source, so free). Basically you can do almost anything in
    > PHP, and it will run on any OS. CMS Systems (e.g. Joomla, Magnolia et
    > al) are great for simple sites, but tend to be a bit limited when it
    > comes to doing things that require databases and interactive forms.
    > As a Java programmer, I would be keen to use Java rather than PHP,
    > but the hosting services charge a premium for hosting something like
    > Liferay portal. As a result, the two sites I maintain use PHP.
    >

    I totally disagree. The form handling in most CMSes is superb. Database
    access is likewise superb. I've not looked at Joomla, but am more
    familiar with Drupal. If you want a *professional* site, those are the
    way to go. Or Kenticos or similar if you want a Windows platform. Any
    supposed limitations are because of the misunderstanding of the tool.
    It's difficult to find a serious site that doesn't use some form of
    underlying CMS. I would urge you strongly not to 'redefine the wheel'
    and try to build your own.
    >
    > I agree with the previous poster's "design being the key" comments.
    > I have worked with a couple of design experts, and it is rewarding
    > to see the great results you can acheive when there is a
    > collaboration between artistic ability and technical expertise
    > (unfortunately these two don't tend to come in the same cranium).
    >

    Never, in my experience.
    >
    > So, as a programmer, I would suggest:
    >
    > - HTML for a site that just displays a few pretty pages - PHP for a
    > moderate to complex site - Liferay or a similar Java Portal product
    > if you are going to allow users to have accounts, have personal
    > pages, contribute to bloggs etc. - Java JSP or MS ASP.NET for complex
    > custom sites. JSP is free (e.g Apache& Tomcat), but ASP is a custom
    > Microsoft product. There is a steep learning curve for both.
    >

    DON'T build your own from scratch. There are now any number of
    frameworks, platforms, CMS, call them what you will. Use one of those.
    >
    > PHP is very well supported. The Eclipse IDE has a reasonably good
    > plugin, and a number of open-source editors are available. PHP will
    > run on Windows or Linux (Just install the Apache web server and turn
    > on PHP), and I think on the MAC. Nearly all hosting services offer
    > the LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP). Any experience with
    > LAMP looks good on your CV :) I recently purchased a huge tome on PHP
    > + MySQL for $NZ60 - recommended!
    >
    > Keep in mind that once you master HTML and CSS, the associated
    > implementation technology (e.g. PHP or JSP) is a smaller learning
    > curve.
    >

    Don't bother. A decent CMS will provide the platform without the need
    for knowledge of the details. HTML and CSS are all you need. A little
    PHP will be good but most of it will be cut and paste stuff.
    >
    > Before you start, set expectations - do you need online payments?
    > user accounts?, blogs? How much can you afford a month? How much
    > traffic? Will the site expand? The answer to these questions will
    > affect your choice of technology and hosting service. Changing
    > technology mid- stream is the computing equivalent of emptying
    > bedpans for a job, so is best avoided.
    >

    Most CMSes will have modules or plugins for this stuff. It's not an issue.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The ends justifies the means - Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli.

    The end excuses any evil - Sophocles
     
    Enkidu, Jul 28, 2011
    #8
  9. nospam

    Guest


    >I totally disagree. The form handling in most CMSes is superb. Database
    >access is likewise superb. I've not looked at Joomla, but am more
    >familiar with Drupal. If you want a *professional* site, those are the
    >way to go. Or Kenticos or similar if you want a Windows platform. Any
    >supposed limitations are because of the misunderstanding of the tool.
    >It's difficult to find a serious site that doesn't use some form of
    >underlying CMS. I would urge you strongly not to 'redefine the wheel'
    >and try to build your own.



    I had been put off using a CMS some years ago when I had a lot of
    hassles with WordPress, but after reading your opinion I have now
    looked into both Drupal and Joomla. The Joomla video tutorials are
    some of the very best I have come across. Given the clarity of these
    tutorials I would suggest that the OP take the Joomla route and
    choose a host that allows him to do so.
     
    , Jul 29, 2011
    #9
  10. nospam

    nospam Guest

    On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 11:04:31 +1200, wrote:

    >
    >>I totally disagree. The form handling in most CMSes is superb. Database
    >>access is likewise superb. I've not looked at Joomla, but am more
    >>familiar with Drupal. If you want a *professional* site, those are the
    >>way to go. Or Kenticos or similar if you want a Windows platform. Any
    >>supposed limitations are because of the misunderstanding of the tool.
    >>It's difficult to find a serious site that doesn't use some form of
    >>underlying CMS. I would urge you strongly not to 'redefine the wheel'
    >>and try to build your own.

    >
    >
    > I had been put off using a CMS some years ago when I had a lot of
    >hassles with WordPress, but after reading your opinion I have now
    >looked into both Drupal and Joomla. The Joomla video tutorials are
    >some of the very best I have come across. Given the clarity of these
    >tutorials I would suggest that the OP take the Joomla route and
    >choose a host that allows him to do so.
    >


    I'll look at those tutorials, thanks. Coffeecup that you mentioned
    looked interesting though. I guess a CMS would be better because it
    would useful if my friend could maintain the website himself instead
    of depending on other people.
     
    nospam, Jul 29, 2011
    #10
  11. nospam

    nospam Guest

    On Fri, 29 Jul 2011 11:04:31 +1200, wrote:

    >
    >>I totally disagree. The form handling in most CMSes is superb. Database
    >>access is likewise superb. I've not looked at Joomla, but am more
    >>familiar with Drupal. If you want a *professional* site, those are the
    >>way to go. Or Kenticos or similar if you want a Windows platform. Any
    >>supposed limitations are because of the misunderstanding of the tool.
    >>It's difficult to find a serious site that doesn't use some form of
    >>underlying CMS. I would urge you strongly not to 'redefine the wheel'
    >>and try to build your own.

    >
    >
    > I had been put off using a CMS some years ago when I had a lot of
    >hassles with WordPress, but after reading your opinion I have now
    >looked into both Drupal and Joomla. The Joomla video tutorials are
    >some of the very best I have come across. Given the clarity of these
    >tutorials I would suggest that the OP take the Joomla route and
    >choose a host that allows him to do so.
    >


    Do you have any comment on the joomla hosting
    http://www.cloudaccess.net/pricing.html

    It looks good to me.
     
    nospam, Jul 30, 2011
    #11
  12. nospam

    Gordon Guest

    On 2011-07-30, WorkHard <> wrote:
    > EMB wrote:
    >> On 29/07/2011 11:04 a.m., wrote:
    >>
    >>> I had been put off using a CMS some years ago when I had a
    >>> lot of
    >>> hassles with WordPress

    >>
    >> Wordpress is a CMS like an abacus is a computer.

    >
    > Wrong! You don't seem to have much experience with Wordpress,
    > EMB.
    >
    > It's great. Especially when you use php (for custom functions)
    > and css for styling. Along with hooks and filters.


    I read that 12% of the sites on the web use it.

    >
    > Simple, clean, easy.


    From my wee bit of playing around with it. This is true.

    [snip]
    >
    > But then, it does depend on what you want for your site and what
    > its purpose is.
    >

    Indeed.

    Wordpress, is about words, blogging, news etc. Some would say it is the
    Wordprocessor of the web.
     
    Gordon, Jul 30, 2011
    #12
  13. nospam

    Richard Guest

    On 7/30/2011 1:03 PM, WorkHard wrote:
    > EMB wrote:
    >> On 29/07/2011 11:04 a.m., wrote:
    >>
    >>> I had been put off using a CMS some years ago when I had a
    >>> lot of
    >>> hassles with WordPress

    >>
    >> Wordpress is a CMS like an abacus is a computer.

    >
    > Wrong! You don't seem to have much experience with Wordpress,
    > EMB.
    >
    > It's great. Especially when you use php (for custom functions)
    > and css for styling. Along with hooks and filters.
    >
    > Simple, clean, easy.
    >
    > Google also loves WP blogs. And the 'Thesis' theme does
    > particularly well with SEO.
    >
    > It's like a canvas you can change/alter to make your site exactly
    > how you like. It has its own API as well.
    >
    > But then, it does depend on what you want for your site and what
    > its purpose is.


    When I last looked at it, there was no decent asset management support
    for it, so you had no idea where images were being used without
    resorting to going to google and doing a search for it and other daft
    things.
     
    Richard, Jul 30, 2011
    #13
  14. nospam

    nospam Guest

    On Sat, 30 Jul 2011 17:55:41 +1200, "WorkHard" <>
    wrote:

    >Gordon wrote:
    >> On 2011-07-30, WorkHard <> wrote:
    >>> EMB wrote:
    >>>> On 29/07/2011 11:04 a.m., wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I had been put off using a CMS some years ago when I had a
    >>>>> lot of
    >>>>> hassles with WordPress
    >>>>
    >>>> Wordpress is a CMS like an abacus is a computer.
    >>>
    >>> Wrong! You don't seem to have much experience with Wordpress,
    >>> EMB.
    >>>
    >>> It's great. Especially when you use php (for custom functions)
    >>> and css for styling. Along with hooks and filters.

    >>
    >> I read that 12% of the sites on the web use it.
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Simple, clean, easy.

    >>
    >> From my wee bit of playing around with it. This is true.
    >>
    >> [snip]
    >>>
    >>> But then, it does depend on what you want for your site and
    >>> what
    >>> its purpose is.
    >>>

    >> Indeed.
    >>
    >> Wordpress, is about words, blogging, news etc. Some would say
    >> it is
    >> the Wordprocessor of the web.

    >
    >That's probably the basic intention. But its can be much more
    >than that, or, even something completely different.
    >


    After googling for a while I discovered that since version 3, WP is
    regarded as a decent CMS and it's probably the most suitable for me.
    Joomla seems to be kind of not well regarded and not just on this page

    http://foliovision.com/2011/04/02/drupal-vs-joomla-mambo-vs-wordpress
     
    nospam, Jul 30, 2011
    #14
  15. nospam

    nospam Guest

    On Sat, 30 Jul 2011 17:55:41 +1200, "WorkHard" <>
    wrote:

    >Gordon wrote:
    >> On 2011-07-30, WorkHard <> wrote:
    >>> EMB wrote:
    >>>> On 29/07/2011 11:04 a.m., wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I had been put off using a CMS some years ago when I had a
    >>>>> lot of
    >>>>> hassles with WordPress
    >>>>
    >>>> Wordpress is a CMS like an abacus is a computer.
    >>>
    >>> Wrong! You don't seem to have much experience with Wordpress,
    >>> EMB.
    >>>
    >>> It's great. Especially when you use php (for custom functions)
    >>> and css for styling. Along with hooks and filters.

    >>
    >> I read that 12% of the sites on the web use it.
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Simple, clean, easy.

    >>
    >> From my wee bit of playing around with it. This is true.
    >>
    >> [snip]
    >>>
    >>> But then, it does depend on what you want for your site and
    >>> what
    >>> its purpose is.
    >>>

    >> Indeed.
    >>
    >> Wordpress, is about words, blogging, news etc. Some would say
    >> it is
    >> the Wordprocessor of the web.

    >
    >That's probably the basic intention. But its can be much more
    >than that, or, even something completely different.
    >



    After googling for a while I discovered that since version 3, WP is
    regarded as a decent CMS and it's probably the most suitable for me.
    Joomla seems to be kind of not well regarded and not just on this page

    http://foliovision.com/2011/04/02/drupal-vs-joomla-mambo-vs-wordpress
     
    nospam, Jul 30, 2011
    #15
  16. nospam

    Guest


    >
    >Do you have any comment on the joomla hosting
    >http://www.cloudaccess.net/pricing.html
    >
    >It looks good to me.


    I thought you had been put off joomla :)
    I have been with hostgator for over 5 years now.
    Their support is infinitely better than any of the 4 hosts I had used
    prior to that
    I have requested support from them on half a dozen occasions. Each
    time I have had a literate useful response within less than 5 minutes
    from techies who obviously knew what they were talking about

    check them out at
    http://www.hostgator.com/shared.shtml

    they offer wordpress and drupal along wth joomla and a bunch of site
    templates.

    I am thinking you might be best starting off with a free html editor
    and playing around with some of the free templates a host should
    provide and only then deciding whether you need to progress to a cms.
     
    , Jul 30, 2011
    #16
  17. nospam

    nospam Guest

    On Sun, 31 Jul 2011 00:06:22 +1200, wrote:

    >
    >>
    >>Do you have any comment on the joomla hosting
    >>http://www.cloudaccess.net/pricing.html
    >>
    >>It looks good to me.

    >
    >I thought you had been put off joomla :)


    Well, actually there seems to be plenty of people defending it so it's
    probably good for some people/ situations. I don't like the idea of
    plugins etc. not being compatible with new releases of the CMS.


    >I have been with hostgator for over 5 years now.
    >Their support is infinitely better than any of the 4 hosts I had used
    >prior to that
    >I have requested support from them on half a dozen occasions. Each
    >time I have had a literate useful response within less than 5 minutes
    >from techies who obviously knew what they were talking about
    >
    >check them out at
    >http://www.hostgator.com/shared.shtml
    >
    >they offer wordpress and drupal along wth joomla and a bunch of site
    >templates.


    I looked them up just after I posted about cloudaccess. hostgator
    seems to be a better deal.


    >
    >I am thinking you might be best starting off with a free html editor
    >and playing around with some of the free templates a host should
    >provide and only then deciding whether you need to progress to a cms.


    Actually I'm hoping my friend can learn to do it so wordpress would
    probably be the best from that point of view.

    Thanks.
     
    nospam, Jul 30, 2011
    #17
  18. nospam

    Enkidu Guest

    On 30/07/11 22:48, nospam wrote:
    > On Sat, 30 Jul 2011 17:55:41 +1200, "WorkHard"<>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Gordon wrote:
    >>> On 2011-07-30, WorkHard<> wrote:
    >>>> EMB wrote:
    >>>>> On 29/07/2011 11:04 a.m., wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I had been put off using a CMS some years ago when I had a
    >>>>>> lot of
    >>>>>> hassles with WordPress
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Wordpress is a CMS like an abacus is a computer.
    >>>>
    >>>> Wrong! You don't seem to have much experience with Wordpress,
    >>>> EMB.
    >>>>
    >>>> It's great. Especially when you use php (for custom functions)
    >>>> and css for styling. Along with hooks and filters.
    >>>
    >>> I read that 12% of the sites on the web use it.
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Simple, clean, easy.
    >>>
    >>> From my wee bit of playing around with it. This is true.
    >>>
    >>> [snip]
    >>>>
    >>>> But then, it does depend on what you want for your site and
    >>>> what
    >>>> its purpose is.
    >>>>
    >>> Indeed.
    >>>
    >>> Wordpress, is about words, blogging, news etc. Some would say
    >>> it is
    >>> the Wordprocessor of the web.

    >>
    >> That's probably the basic intention. But its can be much more
    >> than that, or, even something completely different.
    >>

    >
    > After googling for a while I discovered that since version 3, WP is
    > regarded as a decent CMS and it's probably the most suitable for me.
    > Joomla seems to be kind of not well regarded and not just on this page
    >
    > http://foliovision.com/2011/04/02/drupal-vs-joomla-mambo-vs-wordpress
    >

    That guy doesn't like anything. For him Wordpress sort of wins by not
    being the worst! Interesting comments about Drupal, which as I see it
    removes most of the need to do any coding and has thousands of plugins
    with a really good community and a low learning curve.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The ends justifies the means - Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli.

    The end excuses any evil - Sophocles
     
    Enkidu, Jul 31, 2011
    #18
  19. nospam

    nospam Guest

    On Sun, 31 Jul 2011 12:39:12 +1200, "WorkHard" <>
    wrote:
    >
    >As far as wordpress, it's better to download the WP zip from
    >Wordpress.org and install it yourself via ftp, rather than
    >through Fantastico.
    >
    >It just keeps things nicer and more manageable.
    >
    >Create a database and give it a suitable name. FTP WP and visit
    >website. WP prompts you and sets itself up in a flash.
    >


    Do you know of any free hosts where I can do this, just to try out
    wordpress.


    >
    >> I am thinking you might be best starting off with a free html
    >> editor
    >> and playing around with some of the free templates a host
    >> should
    >> provide and only then deciding whether you need to progress to
    >> a cms.

    >
    >That's too time consuming, surely? A website is all about
    >content. Quality content that serves a specific purpose and gets
    >the response you want.
    >
    >As I suggested, 'Thesis' is an excellent theme for Wordpress.
    >Very good SEO and Google loves sites built with 'Thesis'.
    >
    >Also, as Thesis is a framework it's minimalist and can be used to
    >create a site to look how you want it to.
    >


    I don't like the minimalist look but why is it called a framework?
    Does it extend the "site building capabilities" of wordpress or is it
    just a set of banners, frames, title bars and buttons etc that work in
    a certain way with the help of php.

    Also, there seems to be a lot of "site builders" - hostgator has one
    and this site has one
    http://www.webs.com/features.htm#sitebuilder
    Are these like, really simple tools that do the same job as wordpress
    or joomla but with much less functionality?
     
    nospam, Jul 31, 2011
    #19
  20. nospam

    Guest

    On Sun, 31 Jul 2011 12:39:12 +1200, "WorkHard" <>
    wrote:


    >
    >I'm with Hostgator. Have been for 10 years or so. I have a
    >dedicated server.
    >
    >As far as wordpress, it's better to download the WP zip from
    >Wordpress.org and install it yourself via ftp, rather than
    >through Fantastico.


    Why is it better to install WP yourself?

    Hostgator also have it available through their own QuickInstall
    utility.
     
    , Aug 2, 2011
    #20
    1. Advertising

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